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  NYSSCA UPDATE



School Counseling Presentation at December Board of Regents Meeting
NYSSCA
The NYS Board of Regents began their discussion of regulation recommendations from the Office of Higher Education and Office of P-12 Education regarding school counselors on Dec. 15, 2014. The full item is linked here for your information. The Regents discussed many important questions as they considered not only the recommendations presented but also their concerns for student access to school counselor services and the important role of school counselors supporting college and career readiness.

Presentation of this report to the Regents is the next step towards eventual adoption of regulatory updates which will impact the required components of a district's school counseling program and of school counselor preparation programs. These changes will also impact the requirements for those seeking certification as a K-12 School Counselor in New York State.

We expect there will be considerable discussion as the Regents seek to move forward on these items. NYSSCA will continue to attend the monthly meetings of the Board of Regents and report to our membership the progress being made, especially opportunities for public comment. The Department of Education will draft amendments to current regulations for both P-12 and higher education programs, and will report back to the Board of Regents in April 2015.

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National School Counseling Week
NYSSCA
National School Counseling Week 2015 will be celebrated from Feb. 2-6 to focus public attention on the unique contribution of professional school counselors within U.S. school systems. National School Counseling Week, sponsored by ASCA, highlights the tremendous impact school counselors can have in helping students achieve school success and plan for a career. National School Counseling Week is always celebrated the first full week in February. Click here for resources and more information.
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2015 NYSUT Constituency Awards Nomination Information
NYSSCA
Categories
  • Health Care Professionals Member of the Year (School Counselors are recognized in this catagory)
  • Higher Education Member of the Year
  • Retiree Member of the Year
  • School-Related Professionals Member of the Year
About the awards

These constituency award programs were adopted by the NYSUT Board of Directors to provide a means by which NYSUT can recognize the outstanding contributions made by our members. The selected award recipients will be recognized at the annual NYSUT Representative Assembly and become part of a permanent display at NYSUT headquarters.

Nomination procedure

Each local, or chapter within a local or retiree council is invited to submit one nomination for an award following the criteria given. The signature of the president of the local, council or chapter must appear on the completed form. Nominations should be submitted using the form included. Return the completed form postmarked by Jan. 20. For more information and the nomination form click here.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inspirations for Youth and Families

Inspirations for Youth and Families teen rehab is a small, privately run treatment center and private school located in Florida. The program helps teenagers overcome drug and alcohol addiction in a calm, therapeutic setting. Clients participate in daily exercise, counseling, and a variety of therapies. A typical stay at Inspirations lasts 30 to 90 days.
 


Welcome to the 2015 School Counselor Community Scholarship application. This year's application is presented by The Counseling Geek and The Middle School Counselor. We will be awarding four full ASCA registration scholarships (worth $349 each) at the end of the application window.

A few fast talking small print notes before we get to the application: Only practicing Professional School Counselors, current School Counseling Interns, or District Level School Counseling Administrators are eligible for this scholarship. Student registrations will be paid at the student rate, remaining funds will go towards additional scholarships. All funds are paid via PayPal — you must have a PayPal account. All awardees are giving their word that they will attended the conference in Phoenix if given the funds. If a winner cannot attend for any reason — they will send the money back to Jeff Ream via PayPal as soon as they know they are not able to attend. The money will be awarded to a different applicant. Prior winners are invited to apply, though preference is given to applicants who have not won in the past. All applications are due by the deadline in full. Any questions can be directed to thegeek@thecounselinggeek.com.

The link for more information and applications can be found here: http://www.themiddleschoolcounselor.com/2015/01/its-here-sccs15-scholarship-application.html
or
http://www.thecounselinggeek.com/sccs-2015-scholarship-application



Two weeks, two programs, two life-changing opportunities for the next generation
NYSSCA
Week 1 — July 5-10: Sustainability and Alternative Energy (7th grade graduates)

Week 2, July 12-17: Biomedical Engineering: Bridging the Technology-Medicine Gap (8th grade graduates)


It is with great pleasure that I invite middle schools throughout the Northeast to nominate up to four middle school girls (two — seventh graders and two — eighth graders) for an exciting opportunity at Syracuse University (SU) this July. Project ENGAGE is a successfully piloted and run engineering immersion program for girls who have a wide range of interests and demonstrated abilities across several academic areas. While living at SU, the participants will explore the breadth of topics engineers address within the focus area, gain important problem-solving skills and benefit from the experience of successful female engineers and other role models. The summer program includes mini-courses, readings and discussion, projects, field trips and hands-on learning alongside accomplished female engineers, college professors, and middle school teachers and college students.

Project ENGAGE is limited to a small number of highly qualified young women who are selected through a highly competitive process for each of the two program weeks, not all nominated students will be accepted into the program. Please look over the attached criteria before you nominate students. The John Ben Snow Foundation and Syracuse University's College of Engineering and Computer Science support project ENGAGE 2015. The cost of the program for accepted students is $400 and full scholarships are available.

The application package is attached as both a pdf and as a word document formatted to accept typed in answers, and additional information is available through the Project ENGAGE website. Completed applications must be postmarked by March 6, 2015.

For additional information please contact: Carol Stokes-Cawley, Coordinator, Project ENGAGE at (315) 443-0466 – The College of Engineering and Computer Science, Syracuse University, 223 Link Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244 or email projectengage@syr.edu.

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  AROUND THE INDUSTRY



De Blasio and Fariña plan to shift power from principals to superintendents
New York Post
Mayor de Blasio and Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña plan to undo the school governance system put in place by the Bloomberg administration and shift power from principals to district superintendents, The Post has learned. The radical overhaul, expected to eliminate dozens of school-support networks that principals hire to bolster their schools’ instruction and operations, will begin July 1, sources told The Post.
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Study finds reading to children of all ages grooms them to read more on their own
The New York Times
Cue the hand-wringing about digital distraction: Fewer children are reading books frequently for fun, according to a new report by Scholastic, the children's book publisher. In a 2014 survey of just over 1,000 children ages 6 to 17, only 31 percent said they read a book for fun almost daily, down from 37 percent four years ago. There were some consistent patterns among the heavier readers: For the younger children — ages 6 to 11 — being read aloud to regularly and having restricted online time were correlated with frequent reading; for the older children — ages 12 to 17 — one of the largest predictors was whether they had time to read on their own during the school day.
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Report: New York's school schedule wastes billions of dollars
The Huffington Post
School schedules with afternoon dismissals and long summer breaks contribute to an achievement gap between low-income and wealthier students and waste billions of dollars a year, according to a report from ReadyNation, which advocates education policies that prepare students for work. Students tend to forget what they've learned over summer break, according to research, and low-income students lose more because their families are less likely to afford care and activities that promote learning. ReadyNation says low-income students lose an average of two months of education each summer — more than higher-income students.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Online Courses for School Counselors

Our Online Certificate of Advanced Study (School Counselor) Program offers courses for provisionally certified school counselors seeking to meet the requirements for permanent certification in New York. We also offer online courses to non-matriculated students for professional development.

CLICK for more information
 


Quality education reform starts in the states
The Hill
Conservatives and liberals alike may rejoice at the notion that 2015 brings with it a chance to revamp the controversial 2001 No Child Left Behind Act. Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) will be the new chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, and has said that his top priority is a revision of NCLB. Alexander is on the right track. The top issue facing our country is the education of our children, and it's clear that however well intentioned NCLB was, it's not producing the desired effects. To improve America's schools we need to first work on the people issues: teaching, leadership and governance. But we need to do so at the statehouse, not in Washington, D.C.
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Schools on guard as flu deaths rise
The Wall Street Journal
Schools are taking precautions such as disinfecting buildings and reminding parents to keep sick youngsters at home as an intensifying flu season nationwide has led to a higher number of deaths among children so far. At least 21 children have died from influenza, the federal government said, compared with six at the same point a year ago. Still, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it was too early to ascertain whether this season would be worse than in years past. Cases may rise as students return after winter break, school officials said.
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Surveying the Common Core chatter: How will the standards fare in 2015?
Education Week
If you're closely watching how the Common Core State Standards fare in states this year, there's been plenty of coverage and commentary about the standards for you to enjoy at the start of 2015. Discussions about the fate of the English/language arts and math standards have in some cases begun to resemble those around the stock market: Was last year's turbulence around the common core a small market correction that will leave its long-term trajectory largely unharmed?
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  William Patterson University. Will. Power.

With a wide range of rigorous academic programs, taught by exceptionally qualified professors, we help students develop the knowledge, experience, and confidence they need to achieve success. MORE
 


Obama to seek limits on student data mining
Politico
President Barack Obama is expected to call for tough legislation to protect student privacy, adding his voice to a sizzling debate about the best way to bring the benefits of technology into the classroom without exposing students to commercial data mining. Obama is expected to urge Congress to impose a bevy of restrictions on companies that operate websites, apps and cloud-computing services aimed at the K-12 market, according to sources briefed on the announcement.
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What schools could use instead of standardized tests
NPR
Close your eyes for a minute and daydream about a world without bubble tests. Education Week recently reported that some Republican Senate aides are doing more than dreaming — they're drafting a bill that would eliminate the federal mandate on standardized testing. Annual tests for every child in reading and math in grades 3 through 8, plus one in high school, have been a centerpiece of federal education law since 2002. No Child Left Behind, the current incarnation of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, requires them.
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Miss an issue of NYSSCA Today? Click here to visit the NYSSCA Today archive page.


US officials step up efforts to help students learning English
Los Angeles Times
Concerned that too many public schools are failing to adequately help students learning English, federal officials unveiled guidelines on the legal requirements to identify and support them. The U.S. Departments of Justice and Education, which jointly issued the guidelines, have increased their enforcement of laws passed more than four decades ago that require such services amid growing numbers of students who are struggling with English. Nationwide, such students number about 5 million — about 9 percent of all public school pupils — and they have increased in most states between 2002 and 2012.
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Study shows that closing schools due to bad weather doesn't hurt student learning
Star Tribune
Schools that stayed open despite dangerously cold wind chills got their fair share of dings from students and parents. For the record, so did schools that closed. But did either decision hurt student learning? A study published last year by researchers from Harvard University might shed some light on the question. That study, conducted at the behest of the Massachusetts Department of Education, found that keeping schools open during a storm is more detrimental to learning than a school closure.
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Bullies and their victims may be at higher risk of suicide
HealthDay News
A new analysis of research from around the world suggests that kids involved in bullying are at higher risk of suicidal thoughts and actions. Kids who bullied others and were victims themselves were the most troubled of all, the report found. "Our study highlights the significant impact bullying involvement can have on mental health for some youth," said study lead author Melissa Holt, an assistant professor of counseling psychology at Boston University.
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Student success better predicted by personalities than intelligence; why being smart isn't enough
Medical Daily
The importance of preparing for school early has been emphasized time and again throughout the years. Kids need an early start on learning, such as reading and math, in order to succeed in school, especially if they're from a lower socioeconomic background. But parents shouldn't only be focusing on a child's intelligence, a new review finds. They should also be nurturing their kids' personalities.
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NYSSCA Today
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2650  
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