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  NYSSCA UPDATE



New York State School Counselor Association Annual Conference 2015
"School Counselors: Advocating Access for All!"

NYSSCA
The Sagamore Resort, on Lake George, Bolton Landing, NY
Nov. 20-21, 2015
Participant online registration here
Exhibitor online registration here
Call for programs application — Deadline is May 1!

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July 23, 2015
8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Sponsored by NYSSCA
Hosted by: Shenendehowa Central School District
Shenendehowa High School East
970 Route 146
Clifton Park, N.Y.


Register online here
Complete flyer with registration form here.

Learn more about RAMP.

Learn More about our 'Camp Counselor', Dr, Brett Zyromski.

The RAMP designation is based on "The ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs," third edition.

Questions? Email RAMPCAMP@NYSSCA.ORG.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inspirations for Youth and Families

Inspirations for Youth and Families teen rehab is a small, privately run treatment center and private school located in Florida. The program helps teenagers overcome drug and alcohol addiction in a calm, therapeutic setting. Clients participate in daily exercise, counseling, and a variety of therapies. A typical stay at Inspirations lasts 30 to 90 days.
 


Participants needed for national survey of LGBT youth and school

GLSEN (the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network) is conducting the 2015 National School Climate Survey, its ninth national survey of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth about their experiences in school. The National School Climate Survey is a crucial tool documenting the problem of anti-LGBT bias and harassment in K-12 schools across the nation. It is also a chance for LGBT youth to speak out about their experiences and to inform education policymakers and the public about what is really going on in our schools.

LGBT youth who attended high school or middle school sometime during the past school year (2014-2015) and who are at least 13 years old are eligible to participate. Youth who did not complete the entire 2014-2015 school year are also eligible. The survey is completely anonymous.

To take the survey (and for more information) click here.

Thank you so much in advance for helping us with this critical research project! Please don't hesitate to let us know if you have any questions or any ideas of how to get the word out about the survey.

Thanks for reading!

The GLSEN Research Department
glsen.org/research
GLSENResearch@glsen.org
@GLSENResearch

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  Outstanding Academics. Exceptional Value.

At William Paterson University, we pride ourselves on our commitment to providing each student with an exceptional and affordable public higher education experience. MORE
 


NYASP Virtual Lobby Day
NYASP
The New York State School Counselor Association is proud to partner with the New York Association of School Psychologists for a Virtual Lobby Day on April 28, 2015 to advocate for children's mental health services in the schools. As education professionals, we know that mental health matters when it comes to helping our children be successful in school. There are many challenges that we face in providing these services and we need your help to let our NYS Legislators know that without mental health supports for preschool and school-aged children, many of them will struggle and fail in school.

Please follow the 5 easy steps on April 28 outlined by NYASP at http://www.nyasp.wildapricot.org/NYASP-Virtual-Lobby-Day.

Don't leave this for someone else to do; let our voices be heard.

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George B. Kelley Education Foundation
2015 Scholarship Application Suite

The George B. Kelley Education Foundation
The George B. Kelley Education Foundation is the charitable arm of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Beta Pi Lambda Chapter. The foundation was created under the principles of providing service and advocacy for communities in the Capital District. Scholarship, and love for all mankind are the seeds of our Go To High School, Go To College program, which supports this scholarship. Developed in the 1950's, the GBK Scholarship aims to award and acknowledge financially disadvantaged and underserved students from the Capital District, who are committed to the values of scholarship, and improving the lives of others in the community.

Available Scholarships: (Applicants may apply for the general scholarship and/or one of the major specific awards)
  • GBK General Scholarship
  • Elmer L. Green Scholarship for the Physical Sciences (Biology, Chemistry Physics, Engineering, etc.)
  • Leon C. Nelson Scholarship for the Social Sciences (Sociology, Economics, Political Science, History, etc.)
Full Scholarship Information & Application

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Will you be a 1st year college student in the Fall?
Want $$$ for school? APPLY for our Scholarship!

Pride Center
2015 Pride Center Youth Scholarship Offerings

The Pride Center's Youth Scholarship (One $2,500 scholarship will be awarded)
The purpose of the Pride Center's Youth Scholarship is intended to help Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans*, Queer/Questioning, Asexual (LGBTQA) students and their allies who exemplify leadership, academic achievement and commitment to LGBTQA equality.

The David, Gladys, & Candace Groudine Scholarship (Two $2,500 scholarships will be awarded)
The purpose of the David, Gladys, & Candace Groudine Scholarship is intended to help LGBTQA students and their allies who exemplify leadership, academic achievement and commitment to LGBTQA equality.

The Gregg Stein Scholarship (One $2,500 scholarship will be awarded)
Gregg Stein was the brother of Nicole Stein, who established this scholarship in his name. Gregg was born in 1957 and joined the Stein family through a private adoption when he was just days old. Growing up gay in a small Westchester community was far from easy, as many sought to "fix" him. He struck out on his own when he was just 16 years old, moving to California. He was an artist, a bartender with a wicked sense of humor and, according to his sister, "the best older brother a girl could want!" Gregg died of AIDS in 1994 at the age of 37. His memory is a blessing to all who knew him.
  • Visual and performing arts - music, art, theater, sculpture, performance, teaching, etc.
  • Broadcasting
  • Journalism
  • Performance management
  • Design, production, direction, sound
  • Other related field
To learn more, visit our Scholarship Page!

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  AROUND THE INDUSTRY



A guide for guidance counselors: How to help high school students find the right college
Deseret News
Getting from high school to college is no easy task for low-income teenagers. Teachers are busy teaching. Parents, who usually did not attend college themselves, don't know where to begin. And in most urban high schools, guidance counselors are overwhelmed. At some California high schools, one guidance counselor is expected to work with 1,000 students, according to Crystal Byndloss, a senior research associate at MDRC, one of the nation's leading nonprofit social policy research groups. Most states are not doing much better. The national average is well over 450 students per counselor, although the Education Commission of the States recommends 250 or fewer.
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Index indicates most high schools are not challenging students
Education Week
The yardstick for making the The Washington Post's list of Most Challenging High Schools is simple: A school needs to have half of its juniors and half of its seniors take one Advanced Placement course and exam in each of those years. Yet, this year, 89 percent of the country's public high schools did not make the list, which was released April 18. One reason, according to education columnist Jay Mathews who created the index, is that many schools limit access to advanced courses by requiring that students be recommended by a teacher or earn a certain grade point average to sign up.
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College counsel for the poor
The Wall Street Journal
Erin Kelley grew up poor with parents who never went to college, but she is about to do something only 11 percent of Americans like her do: earn a degree. The Boston College senior is the latest success story of Bottom Line, which counsels disadvantaged youth on how to get into college — and graduate. About 80 percent of the nonprofit's clients earn a degree. And in an era of skyrocketing college costs and debate about the value of higher education, they typically leave with relatively little debt and a job waiting for them. The work of Bottom Line, and other groups that provide intensive counseling, is increasingly being studied by academics seeking to boost the prospects of low-income, first-generation college students.
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5 tech tools that support Common Core State Standards
The Journal
According to the 4th Annual Principals' Assessment of Public Education, 95.7 percent of schools in states that have adopted the Common Core State Standards have implemented or are in the process of implementing the standards. Many of those schools are also getting ready to administer the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers and Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium assessments for the first time. To get a sense of what is working in districts around the country, we asked educators to share the technology tools that they are using to help implement CCSS and prepare students for the upcoming assessments.
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5 ways to create a safer digital environment at your school
eSchool News
In "Securing the Connected Classroom: Technology Planning to Keep Students Safe," authors Abbie H. Brown, Ph.D., and Tim D. Green, Ph.D., outline a process that education leaders can follow to develop a secure environment for learning with technology. According to Brown and Green, "the book guides educators, administrators and IT staff through a step-by-step process for creating a district-wide blueprint for keeping students safe while maintaining an appropriate level of security."
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After-school programs feel heat from Congress, critics
Education Week
Brent Cummings' goal for the 400 low-income, at-risk students in the after-school programs he directs in Walla Walla, Wash., is to kindle their interest in learning with the same spark that lit his imagination years ago, when his high school chemistry teacher kicked off a unit on the periodic table of elements by filling a balloon with pure oxygen and igniting it. Now, the programs in Walla Walla and at more than 11,000 other schools and community centers across the country are in limbo because of a congressional tussle over federal funding for after-school programs. The budget talks have reopened a decade-old debate on whether research shows any academic benefits for students enrolled in the programs.
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Miss an issue of NYSSCA Today? Click here to visit the NYSSCA Today archive page.


A new era in teaching: The rise of personalized learning
By: Brian Stack
Education is changing. Schools are evolving into places where students can choose their learning pathway and build their own personalized and customized program that will fit their learning goals and needs. Gone are the days when the one-size-fits-all, stand-and-deliver approach to instruction was appropriate. Today's teachers are coming to recognize their new role as a learning facilitator or coach. From sage on the stage to guide on the side, America's teachers have entered into a new era in their profession.
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Kids' school performance may be determined by genes, which affect motivation levels
Medical Daily
Unmotivated students aren't fully to blame, according to new findings that reinforces nature trumps nurture when it comes to personality development. Researchers at the University of Ohio studied how genetics may play a dominating role in a child's performance in school. The study, published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, found children may inherit motivation from their parents, not their environment.
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Longer school days and years catching on in public K-12
Education Week
A growing number of American schools are ditching the 19th century — when it comes to the school calendar that is. Twice as many schools today have a longer school day or year than just two years ago and, for the first, more of them are traditional public schools than charter schools, according to a joint report by the Boston-based National Center on Time and Learning and the Denver-based Education Commission of the States. Of the 2,009 schools that had expanded learning time last year, 1,208 — or 61 percent — were regular public schools. That's almost a total flip from 2012, when there were 1,079 schools with additional time and 56 percent of them were charters.
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Stay balanced as the school year intensifies
MiddleWeb (commentary)
Elizabeth Stein, a contributor for MiddleWeb, writes: "It's the time of year when our teaching responsibilities are mounted high. We may find ourselves feeling stretched thin by the hectic pace of things we must do and things we should do. If we're lucky we get to do some things we want to do. But it isn't easy. We continue with our regular routines of lesson planning, co-planning, faculty meetings, parent communications and professional development opportunities. IEP's must be reviewed and new IEP's must be written. We can add the testing season, which far too often brings unnecessary stress"
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Kids and anxiety: Many theories exist as to why some kids are anxious and others aren't
The Record
Frustrated parents want to know, "Why?" One in four children suffers from an anxiety disorder during childhood and adolescence, according to experts, but why is this particular child in that 25 percent? Why him instead of his classmate? Why her and not her twin sister? What happened? Why won't it just go away? There are a lot of theories and continuing research as to why some children develop anxiety disorders while others — even those raised in the same environment by the same parents — do not.
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NYSSCA Today
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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