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  NYSSCA UPDATE



Building a Grad Nation
Grad Nation
According to the 2015 Building a Grad Nation report the national high school graduation rate hit a record high of 81.4 percent, and for the third year in a row, the nation remained on pace to meet the goal of 90 percent on-time graduation by 2020.
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Decline in school-based bullying
U.S. Department of Education
New data show the first significant decrease in school-based bullying since the federal government began collecting that data in 2005, suggesting that efforts at the federal, state and local levels to prevent bullying may be paying off.
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Poll shows Americans support education beyond high school
Gallup
An overwhelming majority of Americans continue to believe that having a certificate or degree beyond high school is important to our success as a nation and as individuals.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inspirations for Youth and Families

Inspirations for Youth and Families teen rehab is a small, privately run treatment center and private school located in Florida. The program helps teenagers overcome drug and alcohol addiction in a calm, therapeutic setting. Clients participate in daily exercise, counseling, and a variety of therapies. A typical stay at Inspirations lasts 30 to 90 days.
 


Reach Higher Initiative Convening
CESCAL
The White House released a report this month on the Reach Higher Initiative Convening held at San Diego State University in November 2014 and attended by NYSSCA President and President-Elect, Gloria Jean and Dr. Barb Donnellan. To access the full report, visit CESCAL at: http://www.cescal.org/special-projects/white-house-convening/. We learned a November 2015 Summit is being planned (location to be determined).
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The Comprehensive College and Career Counseling Consortium of New York and New Jersey
CCCCC NY/NJ
The Comprehensive College and Career Counseling Consortium of New York and New Jersey (CCCCC of NY/NJ) was formed as a result of the San Diego Convening and continues to meet monthly to develop a coordinated plan for providing college access services in New York and New Jersey from the perspective of school counselors, counselor educators and college access organizations. For more information about CCCCC NY/NJ, contact Judy Lorimer, jlorimer@goddard.org, or Dr. Stuart Chen-Hayes at stuart.chen-hayes@lehman.cuny.edu.
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  AROUND THE INDUSTRY



City redirects funding for middle school summer programs to struggling schools
New York Daily News
City officials have pulled funding for optional summer programs at 41 city middle schools so the money can be used to turn around struggling schools. The free summer programs, which provide students with tutoring and extracurricular activities, would have been an expansion of Mayor de Blasio's after-school program for middle schoolers called School's Out New York City, which has programs in more than 560 schools. The news, first reported by the education blog Chalkbeat New York means hundreds of kids have to make new plans for their summer activities.
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School counselor talks social media's impact on bullying
KELO-TV
It is bad enough when it is in the hallways, but now, most kids cannot even escape school bullies at home. There are several apps you can download that let you vent about things such as homework and school. Unfortunately, you can also talk about people and you can do this anonymously. A school counselor says this can create issues at school, and it can create new challenges for how she helps students. After a little more than 20 years on the job, Baltic High School Counselor Marilyn Schmitz has seen it all.
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The challenge of the first-generation student
The Chronicle of Higher Education
If you're a low-income student whose parents never earned a degree, simply getting to college is hard enough. You probably didn't get much help from your parents, let alone from pricey private counselors or test-prep courses. And once you enroll, you've got a bunch of new stuff to figure out — like what to study or maybe even how to study. You may need to take remedial courses. You may feel work and family pressures. And if you're at a selective college, you may feel left out when your classmates travel abroad or work in unpaid internships. This special report focuses on the challenges facing first-generation students, whose numbers are growing as demographics shift.
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School bullying, cyberbullying continue to drop
U.S. News & World Report
The percentage of students who reported being bullied or cyberbullied reached a record low in 2013, but female students are still victimized at higher rates, according to new data from the Department of Education. The department released the results of the latest School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, which showed that in 2013, the percentage of students ages 12-18 who reported being bullied dropped to 21.5 percent. That's down from 27.8 percent in 2011, and a high of 31.7 percent in 2007. The percentage of students who reported being cyberbullied also fell to 6.9 percent in 2013, down from 9 percent in 2011.
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In 10 years, America's classrooms are going to be much more diverse than they are now
The Huffington Post
The 2014-2015 school year represents a milestone for America's public schools. For the first time, a majority of students around the country are not white. They identify with minority groups. In future years, experts only expect this trend to accelerate. In honor of The Huffington Post's 10-year anniversary this May, we're looking at the future of American classrooms and what students in these classrooms might look like 10 years from now. In 2025, America's schools will likely be substantially more diverse than they are currently, serving more kids who come from Hispanic, Asian or mixed-race backgrounds. These shifting demographics raise a number of questions about the best ways for schools to serve students who are more diverse than ever before.
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Protecting student privacy in the digital age
The Hill
Schools may be winding down to the end of the school year, but as they do so, they are also ratcheting up the use of technology to bolster student engagement. Whether on a computer or in the cloud, digital tools are being used to help improve students' reading, writing and arithmetic skills. But as student information moves from folders in a cabinet to the folders in the cloud, we need to ensure that the enormous power of technology is harnessed to the benefit of students and not for any unknown means.
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Friends or frenemies? Understanding bullying in schools
Psychology Today
In our culture of 24/7 news cycles and social media connectedness, we have a better opportunity than ever before to bring attention to important issues. In the last few years, Americans have collectively paid attention to the issue of bullying like never before; millions of school children have been given a voice, all 50 states in the U.S. have passed anti-bullying legislation, and thousands of adults have been trained in important strategies to keep kids both physically and emotionally safe in their classrooms and schools. These are significant achievements.
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How poetry can open a whole new world for children with autism
The Huffington Post
Chris Martin has been teaching creative writing to children with autism for more than 10 years. Children with autism often struggle in school because of their restricted interests (usually characterized by one very intense passion), but Martin has found a way to turn this characteristic into a vehicle for learning. "These restricted interests are often portrayed negatively," he writes. "In that they limit the student's ability to access a wider range of interests."
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Setting summer goals: Linking school years together
By: Pamela Hill
For many, just a few days remain in the current school year. Some educators are making final lesson plans for the school year, others are developing summer school lesson plans, and parents are making plans to fill the months of summer with activities. Just as students with Individual Educational Plans should be involved in meeting their school year goals, they should also be involved in setting their summer goals. Many research articles have been published that explain the importance of educational activities for the purpose of avoiding the "summer slide."
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Should teachers be held responsible for a student's character?
MindShift
If you've followed education in the news or at the book store in the past couple of years, chances are you've heard of "grit." It's often defined as the ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal. Alongside growth mindset and self-control, grit is on a short list of not-strictly-academic skills, habits and qualities that researchers have deemed essential. And that research has quickly made its way into the hands of educational leaders eager to impose accountability measures that can go farther than standardized math and reading tests. They want to capture how schools are doing in cultivating the full range of qualities necessary for students to succeed.
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NYSSCA Today
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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