This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Advertisement
Text Version    RSS    Subscribe    Unsubscribe    Archive    Media Kit June 04, 2015

Home   Membership   Conference   Counselor Support   Publications   NYSED   Links   Contact Us    


 



  NYSSCA UPDATE



NYSSCA Graduate Student Scholarships
NYSSCA
To help future school counselors fulfill their educational goals, the New York State School Counselor Association awards scholarships to graduate students each year who are currently enrolled in a New York State accredited master's-level school counseling program.

Scholarships are awarded based on students' academic achievement, contributions to the field and commitment to the promotion of the ASCA/NYSSCA Comprehensive Model and NYS Learning Standards.

The following graduate students in School Counselor Ed programs from around the state have been awarded $500 scholarships this year to use towards their studies.

Damon Clark (Syracuse)
Andrea Nicolia (Niagara University)
Molly Dandino (SUNY Buffalo)
Donna Orleman (NYIT-Old Westbury)



NYSUT's Health Care Professionals of the Year
NYSUT
NYSUT United Newsletter is linked here featuring Health Care Professionals of the Year — NYSSCA's President Elect-Elect Rosemarie Thompson is recognized on page 23. Congratulations, Rosemarie.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




National scholarship honors Maria Portalatin
American Federation of Teachers Latino Caucus
June 12 is the deadline to apply for the AFT Latino Caucus's Maria Portalatin National Freedom Scholarship. Each of three high school seniors of Hispanic/Latino heritage, with a parent or guardian who is a member of a union, will receive a $1,000 book stipend and a laptop. The late UFT leader Maria Portalatin received NYSUT's prestigious "Not for Ourselves Alone:" The Sandy Feldman Outstanding Leadership Award in 2010.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


You can help empower young women
The Joseph Toles Foundation
Do you know a young woman in 10th grade who is a promising leader and that you would like to mentor? Nominate her to participate in the Fight for Your Might Girls Empowerment Conference. The nomination deadline is June 15. Each year, The Joseph Toles Foundation sponsors educational learning experiences for children from all walks of life. This year 62 young women — one from each county in New York — potential leaders who are passionate about helping their communities will participate. Here's more information about how to become a mentor.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inspirations for Youth and Families

Inspirations for Youth and Families teen rehab is a small, privately run treatment center and private school located in Florida. The program helps teenagers overcome drug and alcohol addiction in a calm, therapeutic setting. Clients participate in daily exercise, counseling, and a variety of therapies. A typical stay at Inspirations lasts 30 to 90 days.
 


Mini-Grant Applications — Deadline this Friday, June 5
National Girls Collaborative
NY STEAM Girls Collaborative will be awarding mini-grants on June 25th, 2015. Mini-grants are awarded to girl-serving science, technology, engineering and mathematics focused programs to support collaboration, address gaps and overlaps in service, and share exemplary practices.

Mini-grants are a small amount of seed funding and are not intended to fully fund entire projects. The maximum mini-grant award is $1000.

Mini-Grant Application Requirements:
  • At least two programs from different organizations must collaborate on the mini-grant project.
  • All programs/organizations collaborating on the mini-grant must be registered in the Program Directory.
  • The applicant must choose one of her/his programs to be the lead program.
  • The lead program must be located in a collaborative state or region currently offering mini-grants.
  • Preference is given to projects that are innovative and include a collaboration between organizations that has not occurred before.
  • Mini-grant projects must last longer than one day, unless the one-day project is part of a larger event (e.g. a one-day ST
  • EM conference for middle school girls that is included within a week-long summer camp).
Open Date: NOW
Close Date: June 5
Decision Date: June 25

Questions?
Please visit the Mini-Grant Applicant Resources webpage for more information.

Still need help?
Please contact Stephanie Lemnios at nysteam4girls@gmail.com.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE



July 23, 2015
8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Sponsored by NYSSCA
Hosted by: Shenendehowa Central School District
Shenendehowa High School East
970 Route 146
Clifton Park, N.Y.


DID YOU KNOW ... RAMP Camp is NOT just for schools ready to apply for the designation of Recognized ASCA Model Program. If you just want to learn more about the ASCA National Model, RAMP Camp is for you! Come kick-start your school counselor program development.

Register online here
Complete flyer with registration form here.

Learn more about RAMP.

Learn More about our 'Camp Counselor', Dr, Brett Zyromski.

The RAMP designation is based on "The ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs," third edition.

Questions? Email RAMPCAMP@NYSSCA.ORG.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE

  AROUND THE INDUSTRY



Most colleges weigh student discipline records in admissions
Education Week
In a little-known practice that could harm students' chances of getting into the college of their choice, the vast majority of colleges and universities use disciplinary records to help determine whether to accept or reject a student's application, according to a new study. The study was conducted by the Center for Community Alternatives, a New York-based organization that advocates on behalf of students who've had prior court involvement. It found that roughly 3 out of 4 colleges and universities collect high school disciplinary information, and that 89 percent of those institutions use the information to make admission decisions.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPOTLIGHT SHOWCASE
  Earn Permanent Certification in NYS

Take courses 100% online, and complete permanent certification in as little as one year!

The CAS in School Counseling at The College at Brockport is specifically designed to fit your schedule. Earn your certificate from an accredited program, with experienced faculty.

Pursue something greater at The College at Brockport. Apply now!
 


Suicide and mental health: New resources inform teachers about warning signs
Education Week
A coalition of organizations have partnered to develop online training materials that will help teachers of students as young as elementary school recognize and respond to early warning signs for suicide and mental health issues. "Signs Matter: Early Detection" by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention in partnership with LEGAL ONE, which is a provider of school law training for educators, and Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care. The aim is not to expand the role of teachers into mental health and psychology, said Dr. Christine Moutier, chief medical officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


3 paths for high school seniors to consider this summer
U.S. News & World Report
Teens who have reached the end of junior year and don't know what they want to do after high school shouldn't panic. "We have plenty who know exactly what they want to do and then we have plenty who are walking around here like, 'I have no idea,'" says Steve Schneider, a school counselor at Sheboygan South High School in Wisconsin. But rising seniors unsure about their future have work to do this summer. Students who have no idea what they want to do after high school need to spend some time in self-reflection, thinking critically about what they care about and their passions before they start considering what path they will take, says Schneider.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How schools maximize gifted talent
District Administration Magazine
The U.S. public school system's focus on struggling students leaves high-achievers — especially minorities, the economically disadvantaged and English language learners — without a challenging enough education, experts say. A lack of federal funding and patchwork policies across states often leave decisions on identifying and serving gifted students to district administrators. An estimated 3 million to 5 million academically gifted students attend K-12 schools, and it is unknown how many are receiving services, according to the National Association for Gifted Children.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Miss an issue of NYSSCA Today? Click here to visit the NYSSCA Today archive page.


1 in 5 U.S. schoolchildren are living below federal poverty line
The Washington Post
More than one out of every five school-age children in the U.S. were living below the federal poverty line in 2013, according to new federal statistics. That amounted to 10.9 million children — or 21 percent of the total — a six percent increase in the childhood poverty rate since 2000. Childhood poverty rates were on the rise for every racial group, ranging from 39 percent for African Americans and 36 percent for Native Americans, 32 percent for Hispanics and 13 percent for Asians and whites.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How do we help our least motivated, most disruptive students?
The Washington Post
Urban public school teachers, parents and students often tell me if we got rid of disruptive students and made sure everyone did their work, more kids would learn. Is there a way to do that?
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The organized kindergartener: Squared away for success
ADDitude Magazine
Kindergarten is a wake-up moment for many kids with ADHD. Suddenly, they run into demands to "sit still and listen." Many encounter rules for the first time. Not only do they need to learn the rules, they also need to make new friends, learn new skills, get along with students from other backgrounds, and work in large groups. Parents are shocked by that first phone call from school. At home, their child is manageable, but children with ADHD often lag behind their peers by as much as 30 percent in mastering life and social skills. Structure and support will prevent them from stumbling.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How schools can help nurture students' mental health
MindShift
By the time he entered second grade, Eric had already witnessed graphic violence and watched as his family fell apart. He'd been moved to a new state and a new home, but he wasn't thriving, especially in school. Eric's reading level was measured in single digits — that is, below the 10th percentile for children his age. "He was so preoccupied by the trauma he'd experienced that it was impairing his learning," says Steve Lepinski, who followed Eric's progress.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Educators are concerned about students going hungry this summer
The Huffington Post
While most kids are counting down the days to summer, low-income children are dreading the sound of the final bell, which signals hunger season is setting in. Across the U.S., 83 percent of 1,100 educators who were recently surveyed said they're worried that their students won't have enough to eat over summer break, according to No Kid Hungry. But it's hardly a new concern. During the 2012-2013 school year, 21.5 million students received free or reduced-priced lunch, according to the Food Research and Action Center. While the need remains the same when school's out, the resources aren't as readily available because of the bureaucracy involved in starting a food program and because struggling parents often can't access the sites that do serve meals.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 



NYSSCA Today
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2650  
Contribute news

Be sure to add us to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox. Learn how.

This edition of NYSSCA Today was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here — it's free!

Recent issues

May 28, 2015
May 21, 2015
May 14, 2015
May 7, 2015






7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063