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EMS/Paramedic, Police, and Fire Research Funding Project
PAC
The purpose of this project was to create a summary of available funding sources that may leverage research within the first responder community. It is intended to serve as a reference for those within the first responder community who are looking to become, or are currently involved, in research to secure funding to support their work. This project is a partnership between the Paramedic Chiefs of Canada, the Paramedic Association of Canada and the Canadian Emergency Medical Services Research Network, with funding support from the Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC), Center for Security Science.
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EMS/Paramedic, Police, and Fire Research Funding Project: Part 2
PAC
Click the link for an appendix of EMS and Paramedic Funding Opportunities.
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Is there enough mental health support for first responders?
Global News
As a paramedic responding to emergency calls, Jim Harris says he often saw people going through the "worst day of their life." The former front-line paramedic was on the job for two decades. First responders — police, paramedics, firefighters — come across violence, substance abuse, and severe health emergencies on a day-to-day basis.
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 Chapter News


HIV testing at shelter recognized
Winnipeg Free Press
If you've ever had to tell someone devastating news, you can vaguely imagine the stress a paramedic goes through when telling someone they've tested positive for HIV. For Ryan Sneath, a full-time paramedic at the Main Street Project, it's a daily possibility. His duties include assessing incoming patients in the city's only intoxicated persons detention area and administering routine HIV tests for clients.
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Video: 13 responders commit suicide in 10 weeks
Global News
In this video, Ambulance Paramedics of B.C. Health & Wellness Director and Paramedic Bob Parkinson discusses first responder suicides.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
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7 B.C. jobs that redefine what 'hard work' really is
The Province
Canadians say they have pretty tough jobs. One in four Canadians describes their job as being highly stressful, according to a Statistics Canada survey released this spring. Almost two-thirds of highly stressed workers say it's the job itself, rather than factors outside work, that triggers their stress.

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Boost coming for paramedics
Sudbury Star
It's a little hard to envision, but a Greater Sudbury paramedic, over the course of a single shift, helps move some 9.2 tons of people and equipment. That's because the average weight of a Greater Sudbury patient in 2013 was 176 pounds. Combine the patient weight with the stretcher and additional equipment such as a defibrillator, and the total weight per lift balloons to about 385 pounds.

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Manitoba ambulance hits cow, then bursts into flames
CBC News
A paramedic was hurt after his vehicle hit a cow on the highway and then erupted in flames. It happened recently just outside of Dauphin. There were two paramedics in the vehicle. One was driving and the other was attending to a patient in the back.

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Medics defend sick time after controversial comments
CKWS-TV
When a call comes in, paramedics don't always know what kind of medical situation awaits them. It's a race against time as they race to assist those in need. Their job is busy, stressful and often dangerous. "We see, hear and smell things in the course of our duties that the average person would be horrified by, if they were exposed to once."
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 Paramedicine Research


Can EMS use turn-around time as a proxy for measuring off-load time?
Journal of Emergency Medicine
"Off-load delay" occurs when the transfer of care from paramedics to the emergency department (ED) is prolonged. Accurately measuring the delivery interval or "off-load" is important, because it represents the time patients are waiting for definitive care. Because recording this interval presents a significant challenge, most emergency medical services systems only measure the complete at-hospital time or "turn-around interval," and most off-load delay research and policy is based on this proxy.
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Enhancing paramedics procedural skills using a cadaveric model
Bio Med Central
Paramedic education has evolved in recent times from vocational post-employment to tertiary pre-employment supplemented by clinical placement. Simulation is advocated as a means of transferring learned skills to clinical practice. Sole reliance of simulation learning using mannequin-based models may not be sufficient to prepare students for variance in human anatomy.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Integration: A New Direction for Canadian Health Care (Canadian Nurses Association | Canadian Medical Association | Health Action Lobby)
Paramedics on bicycles rolling through downtown Winnipeg (CTV News)
Paramedics role to expand in health care (Alberni Valley Times)
Ambulance 'tagging' less of an issue (Cold Lake Sun)
Intranasal naloxone for pre-hospital opioid overdose (Emergency Medicine News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 In the Media


Dozens more paramedics to shore up strained EMS
Niagara This Week
Politicians recently voted to spend nearly half a million dollars this year and potentially millions more in the years going forward in order to address serious strains in Niagara's Emergency Medical Services. During a Regional Public Health meeting, councillors recommended hiring the equivalent of two 24-hour ambulance crews (or 16 full-time paramedics) plus two operations supervisors starting in September.
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Long-time paramedic gave lessons in compassion
Hamilton Spectator
Over his more than 40-year career as a paramedic, Brian Dowd has delivered nine babies — two were named after him. He's held the hand of countless family members devastated by a death. He once revived a 10-year-old boy that his best friend, a Burlington firefighter, pulled from a blaze and placed in his arms.
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Firefighters publicizing concerns over ambulance wait times
Global News
The Firefighters Association is taking their concerns over B.C. Ambulance wait times to the public. The association is airing radio and newspaper ads, warning people of what it calls dangerous and lengthy delays. B.C. Ambulance Services says changes to how they respond to some non-critical calls are fine and patients aren't suffering.
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Laval mayor's response on ambulances called 'an insult to the people'
Montreal Gazette
Gerald Riley's wife called 911 three times before an ambulance showed up when he suffered an acute heart attack in February 2013. The dental surgeon, who lives in the Fabreville district in northern Laval, said he waited about 20 minutes for an ambulance, despite his condition being a top priority for speedy response.
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PAC eNews
Frank Humada, Multiview, Director of Publishing, 289.695.5422
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Katherine Radin, Multiview, Content Editor, 289.695.5388   
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