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LEGAL

Leahy calls for NIH march-in against Myriad but some patents not subject to Bayh-Dole
Bloomberg Law
The National Institutes of Health should use its march-in rights under the Bayh-Dole Act to force Myriad Genetics Inc. to license its patents related to testing for genetic mutations associated with breast and ovarian cancer, according to a July 12 letter sent by Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, D-Vt., to NIH Director Francis S. Collins.
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SGO NEWS


Annual Meeting abstract submission now open
SGO
The Society of Gynecologic Oncology encourages all health care professionals who are a part of a women's cancer care team to submit abstracts and surgical films for consideration in the scientific program for SGO's 45th Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer, March 22-25, 2014, in Tampa, FL. This is your opportunity to share with us the innovative research you have worked on to advance science in the field of gynecologic oncology. Make an online submission now.
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PREVENTION


Could HPV vaccination help reduce risk of throat cancers?
NPR
A study of women in Costa Rica is raising hope that getting vaccinated against the human papillomavirus, or HPV, could lower the risk of throat cancers. The research doesn't show that. It would take a much bigger and longer study to do that — if such a study could ethically be done at all. What this study does show is that among the nearly 6,000 women in the study, those who got vaccinated against two strains of the virus had 93 percent fewer HPV throat infections four years later. Since the virus is strongly linked to throat cancers, that should reduce the risk of these malignancies.
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Vaccinating boys plays hey role in HPV prevention
ScienceDaily
Improving vaccination rates against the human papillomavirus in boys aged 11 to 21 is key to protecting both men and women, says new research from University of Toronto Professor Peter A. Newman from the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. HPV has been linked to anal, penile and certain types of throat cancers in men. Since the virus is also responsible for various cancers in women, vaccinating boys will play a crucial role in reducing cancer rates across the sexes.
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Eating fries, potato chips may increase risk of endometrial, ovarian cancer
Food Consumer
A study in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers Prevention suggests that eating fried foods like french fries which are found high in a carcinogen called acrylamide can increase the risk of endometrial and ovarian cancers, but not breast cancer. Jenneke Hogervorst from Maastricht University in Maastricht, the Netherlands and colleagues conducted the observational study and found women with higher intake of acrylamide were at 29 and 78 percent increased risk for endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer respectively, compared with lower intake of acrylamide.
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RESEARCH


New hope for hormone-resistant breast cancer
ScienceDaily
A new finding provides fresh hope for the millions of women worldwide with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Australian scientists have shown that a specific change, which occurs when tumors become resistant to anti-estrogen therapy, might make the cancers susceptible to treatment with chemotherapy drugs.
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Menopausal hot flashes more severe in cancer survivors
Medscape (Free login required)
In the first large-scale study to compare menopausal symptoms in women who have survived cancer with those in women who have never had the disease, cancer survivors were found to have more frequent, severe, and troubling hot flashes. The study, published online July 15 in Menopause, involved 934 cancer survivors — 90 percent of whom had breast cancer) — and 155 control subjects who never had cancer.
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Women's Cancer News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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