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Endometrial cancer on the rise in US; black women most at risk
Reuters
Endometrial cancer is becoming more common in the U.S. and black women appear more likely to get the most aggressive types of tumors and die from the disease, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed cancer registry data from 2000 to 2011 and found incidence rates for endometrial tumors increased among all racial and ethnic groups. But for white women, the increase was less than one percent overall, compared with 1.8 percent for Hispanic women and 2.5 percent for black and Asian women.
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SGO NEWS


Gynecologic Oncology available as mobile app
Subscribers to Gynecologic Oncology can now access the journal on their iOS (Apple) or Android device with a free mobile app. Subscribers can log in to gynecologiconcology-online.net to create a username and password and use the same email and password that they use for their desktop version of Gynecologic Oncology.
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OVARIAN CANCER


Heart drug linked to extra years for ovarian cancer patients
The Wall Street Journal (Subscription required)
A common heart drug called a beta blocker was associated with a striking increase in survival for women with ovarian cancer in a study that suggests a possible new strategy for treating a variety of tumors. Researchers analyzing a database of 1,425 women with the tough-to-treat cancer found those who had taken a certain type of beta blocker lived more than four years longer on average than those who hadn’t been prescribed the drug.
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'Basket study': Clinical trial design explores responses to drugs based on specific mutations in patients' tumors
Science Daily
Researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) have announced results from the first published basket study, a new form of clinical trial design that explores responses to drugs based on the specific mutations in patients' tumors rather than where their cancer originated.
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BREAST CANCER


Early-stage breast condition may not require cancer treatment
The New York Times
As many as 60,000 American women each year are told they have a very early stage of breast cancer — Stage 0, as it is commonly known — a possible precursor to what could be a deadly tumor. And almost every one of the women has either a lumpectomy or a mastectomy, and often a double mastectomy, removing a healthy breast as well. Yet it now appears that treatment may make no difference in their outcomes. Patients with this condition had close to the same likelihood of dying of breast cancer as women in the general population, and the few who died did so despite treatment, not for lack of it, researchers reported in JAMA Oncology.
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Scientists probe obesity's ties to breast cancer risk
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Obesity is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer, but researchers haven't figured out what connects the two. A new study suggests the link may be due to a change in breast tissue structure, which might promote breast cells to progress to cancer. The findings, based on research with tissue from mice and humans, emphasize the need to encourage a healthy weight in women who have breast cancer and in general. The results published in Science Translational Medicine may also have implications for breast cancer detection and breast reconstruction surgeries.
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HOSPICE


A racial gap in attitudes toward hospice care
The New York Times
Twice already, Narseary and Vernal Harris have watched a son die. The first time — Paul, at 26 — was agonizing and frenzied, his body tethered to a machine meant to keep him alive as his sickle cell disease progressed. When the same illness ravaged Solomon, at 33, the Harrises reluctantly turned to hospice in the hope that his last days might somehow be less harrowing than his brother’s. Their expectations were low.
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  Ovarian cancer updates from ASCO 2015:

Four prominent experts in ovarian cancer met in Chicago to provide perspectives related to progress made toward personalized therapy. More
 


HEALTH POLICY


NCCN Policy Summit: Value, Access, and Cost of Cancer Care
National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Value is not a simple term to define in cancer care. Though value is often understood as benefits of treatment or quality of care weighed against the economic cost, it has been less clear which costs and benefits must be considered. The combination of increasingly unsustainable rises in the costs of cancer care, the accelerating pace of expensive innovations in oncology, and persistent hope for rescue in patients with life-threatening disease require solutions that incorporate and promote value.
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Women's Cancer News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202-684-7169  
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