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In endometrial cancer, lymphadenectomy down since 2007
Medscape (Free login required)
In the surgical treatment of endometrioid endometrial cancers, the use of lymphadenectomy has decreased considerably, according to a new study published in Obstetrics & Gynecology. This downward trend reflects results from seminal studies that showed no real benefit of removing lymph nodes in women with this early form of uterine cancer, which led to changes in guidelines, said lead researcher Alexander Melamed, MD, from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.
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SGO NEWS


CDC soliciting nominations for committee on breast and cervical cancer
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is soliciting nominations for membership on the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC) beginning April 2016. This committee provides advice and guidance regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. Additional information can be found on the CDC website. Nominations may be submitted by the candidate or by the person/organization recommending the candidate. The deadline for submission is Sept. 25.
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OVARIAN CANCER


Post-surgical wound complications more common in obese ovarian cancer patients
2 minute medicine
Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of gynecologic cancer death in the U.S., with approximately 22 000 new cases annually, according to a study published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. Risk factors for ovarian cancer include increasing age, nulliparity, infertility and genetic mutations. Staging and initial management for ovarian cancer is primarily surgical. As the number of obese individuals in the U.S. continues to grow, it is necessary to consider the impact of obesity on surgical outcomes.
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GENETICS


'Brave new world' of genetic cancer susceptibility testings
Medscape (Free login required)
"A brave new world is emerging for genetic cancer susceptibility testing," and there is no question that this type of testing has provided clinical benefit to a small segment of the population. But there are also complexities within this field, and there are many areas where the information being uncovered is not fully understood, warn experts discussing the new developments in an editorial published online Aug. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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Genetic testing all women for breast cancer might not be worth the cost
Drug Discovery & Development
Women who are carriers of mutated BRCA genes are known to have a significantly higher risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers than those who don’t. But a new study by UCLA faculty questions the value of screening for the genetic mutations in the general population — including those who do not have cancer or have no family history of the disease — because of the high cost. The study was published in JAMA Oncology.
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PRECISION MEDICINE


The coming third wave of precision cancer medicines
Medical Xpress
Targeted treatments for cancer have been extending and saving lives for more than 15 years — precision medicine isn't a new idea in oncology. Now drugs pioneered on select, specific cancers are, one by one, finding new applications.
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BREAST CANCER


Increasingly questionable oncology 'outcome' data
Clinical Oncology News (Commentary)
Although opponents of breast cancer screening cite less than convincing long-term breast cancer–specific survival outcomes, they acknowledge that these data reflect women who underwent screening many years ago (10, 15, over 20), depending on the duration of follow-up required in the specific analysis. Conversely, proponents of screening argue that screening today employs substantially improved technology that will increase the demonstrated effectiveness of this strategy when it is measured 10, 15, or over 20 years in the future.
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RESEARCH


Research on women's cancers lacking in poor and middle-income countries
Medical Xpress
Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) see millions of cases of breast and cervical cancer each year, but much of the research on these diseases is based in wealthier countries that have far greater resources and treatment options available, according to a review of existing research published Sept. 1 by the CDC's Global and Territorial Health Research Network. The network's coordinating center is based at the University of Rochester. The research disparity means gaps in our understanding of these cancers, since they may behave differently based on patients' geography, culture and local medical practices.
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Targeted genomic profiling reveals recurrent KRAS mutations and gain of chromosome 1q in mesonephric carcinomas of the female genital tract
Modern Pathology via Nature.com (Login required)
Mesonephric carcinoma is a rare form of gynecologic cancer derived from mesonephric remnants usually located in the lateral wall of the uterine cervix. An analogous tumor occurs in the adnexa, female adnexal tumor of probable Wolffian origin. The pathogenesis and molecular events in mesonephric carcinoma are not known.
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  Ovarian cancer updates from ASCO 2015:

Four prominent experts in ovarian cancer met in Chicago to provide perspectives related to progress made toward personalized therapy. More
 


MORCELLATION


Government watchdog to investigate hysterectomy device found to spread uterine cancer
The Wall Street Journal (Subscription required)
The U.S. Government Accountability Office confirmed that it plans to investigate a surgical device that was marketed for two decades before the Food and Drug Administration warned it can spread uterine cancer. Twelve lawmakers wrote the GAO a letter last month asking for a probe into laparoscopic power morcellators, which are bladed, drill-shaped tools gynecologists commonly used to cut up growths called fibroids in minimally invasive surgery, most often hysterectomies.
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HEALTH POLICY


What if your patients don't want to take their clothes off?
Medscape (free login required)
Most patients understand that going to a physician involves a physical examination that may require removal of some or all of their clothing. And although they may not like being undressed in front of a stranger, they accept it as a necessary inconvenience of medical care. But some patients are particularly uncomfortable.
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Women's Cancer News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202-684-7169  
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