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Cediranib boosts survival in recurrent ovarian cancer
Medscape (Free login required)
The investigational agent cediranib can extend survival in women with recurrent ovarian cancer, according to a new study. When given concurrently with platinum-based chemotherapy, there was an approximate 30 percent improvement in progression-free survival. Cediranib continued as maintenance therapy significantly improved both progression-free and overall survival.
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TREATMENT


Cervical cancer standard has no overall survival benefit
Medscape (Free login required)
The world standard for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer does not improve overall survival, according to the first-ever randomized controlled trial of patients with advanced-stage disease. However, the standard treatment — adding chemotherapy to radiotherapy — did significantly improve disease-free survival, said lead author Antonio Zuliani, M.D., a radiation oncologist at Campinas State University in Brazil.
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FDA approves first pre-surgical breast cancer drug
Boston Globe
The Food and Drug Administration approved a biotech drug to become the first medicine to treat breast cancer before surgery. Perjeta, made by Roche's Genentech unit, would be an option for women with a form of early-stage breast cancer who face a high risk of having their cancer spread. Surgery to remove tumors is usually the first step in treating most forms of cancer.
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POLICY


Oncologists call for industry-led global fund to fight cancer
Reuters
The world faces a rapidly growing burden of cancer which will overwhelm governments unless the medical and pharma industry takes the lead on a multi-billion dollar private-public fund, oncologists said. In a report on how rates of cancer diagnosis and death are rising across the world while access to diagnosis and treatment is extremely patchy, experts described the economics of the problem as daunting and current financing models as broken.
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Government shutdown to impact science
The Scientist
Because legislators in Congress failed to pass a temporary 2014 spending bill, the U.S. government is officially "shut down" for the first time in 17 years. This means that some government offices are shuttered, nonessential services are halted, and some 800,000 government employees won't be at work. Furloughs triggered by the shutdown apply to most federal scientists, except those involved in patient or animal care. But the effects of the shutdown — though unlikely to last more than a month or so — might also trickle down to academic researchers, many of whom are funded through grants administered by the National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation.
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RESEARCH


Capturing cancer: Liquid biopsy could improve cancer diagnosis and treatment
Phys.org
A microfluidic chip developed at the University of Michigan is among the best at capturing elusive circulating tumor cells from blood — and it can support the cells' growth for further analysis. The device, believed to be the first to pair these functions, uses the advanced electronics material graphene oxide. In clinics, such a device could one day help doctors diagnose cancers, give more accurate prognoses and test treatment options on cultured cells without subjecting patients to traditional biopsies.
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'Jekyll-and-Hyde' protein may be the key to stopping cancer metastasis
Fox News
One of the deadliest aspects of a cancerous tumor is its ability to grow and spread, assimilating and destroying healthy cells throughout the body. Controlling this lethal expansion, known as metastasis, can be a difficult endeavor. But now, researchers have revealed that a notoriously fickle protein may be the key to stopping cancer's rapid development.
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Study shows prevalence of PTSD responses in female patients after cancer treatment
News-Medical.net
A paper published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics provides data concerned with the appropriateness of a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder in women with a diagnosis of cancer. Previous research has shown considerable variation in the proportion of patients who develop posttraumatic stress symptoms resulting in a PTSD among cancer patients .
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Mexican scientists reveal aflatoxins relationship with cervical and liver cancer in humans
News-Medical.net
Mexican scientists identified and quantified the amount of aflatoxins (carcinogenic) in food such as corn tortilla, rice, chili pepper, processed sauces, chicken breast and eggs, and revealed its relationship with cervical and liver cancer in humans. The research won the National Award in Food Science and Technology in the Science Professional in Foods category organized jointly by National Council of Science and Technology and the Mexican Coca-Cola Industry. It explains that both types of cancer can be originated by the ingestion of food contaminated with aflatoxins produced by the fungi Aspergilus flavus and A. parasiticus.
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