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Longer wait for uterine cancer surgery reduces survival
HealthDay News via Oncology Nurse Advisor
Women who have longer wait times from diagnosis of uterine cancer to definitive surgery have reduced overall survival, according to research published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Lorraine M. Elit, M.D., of McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and colleagues analyzed data for 9,417 women with uterine cancer to assess the effect of wait time (from histologic diagnosis to definitive surgery by hysterectomy) on all-cause survival.
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GENETICS


Negative BRCA gene test doesn't always mean lower breast cancer risk
Fox News
Testing negative for the BRCA2 gene mutation doesn't necessarily mean a women isn't still at high risk for developing breast cancer. In a new study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, researchers from the University of Manchester in England revealed that women who come from families with BRCA2 mutations are still at a greater risk for developing breast cancer — even if they test negative for the BRCA2 gene themselves.
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In Israel, a push to screen for cancer gene leaves many conflicted
The New York Times
Israel has one of the highest rates of breast cancer in the world, according to a World Health Organization report. And some leading scientists here are advocating what may be the first national screening campaign to test women for cancer-causing genetic mutations common among Jews — tests that are already forcing young women to make agonizing choices about what they want to know, when they want to know it and what to do with the information.
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RESEARCH


Extraperitoneal lymphadenectomy nets bigger node harvest in endometrial cancer
Oncology Report Digital Network
Extraperitoneal para-aortic lymphadenectomy can result in more harvested nodes than standard laparoscopic or robot-assisted laparoscopic staging of patients with endometrial cancer, according to Dr. Janelle Pakish. Harvesting the nodes does take longer this way — about 50 minutes longer than a standard laparoscopic staging and 40 minutes longer than a robotic-assisted one. But a retrospective study of 194 cases found that it secured twice as many para-aortic nodes, with half the conversion rate to open surgery as with laparoscopic staging, Dr. Pakish said at a meeting sponsored by the AAGL.
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Older women still getting Pap smears despite guidelines
Reuters via Chicago Tribune
Women who've had a hysterectomy, and most women over 65, don't need regular swabs for signs of cervical cancer — but lots of them are getting the test anyway, say U.S. researchers. Experts recommend that young women start having internal pelvic exams, including a Papanicolaou test, or "Pap smear," to check for abnormal cells on the cervix, performed by a gynecologist at age 21. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women ages 21 to 65 without a history of cervical problems have a Pap smear every three years.
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Scientists describe new proteins linked to cancer
Medical News Today
A newly defined family of proteins has been analyzed by researchers, who say its control over another class of proteins involved in cell division — CAAX proteins — could have major implications for cancer research. Results of their findings were recently published in the journal Nature. The new protein family is called glutamate intramembrane proteases, and the research team, from The Institute of Cancer Research in London, says the founding member of this family — a protein called Rce1 — plays an important role in converting healthy cells into cancerous ones.
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Protein folding becomes cancer treatment target
Medical Xpress
A molecule that helps cancer cells to keep dividing could be a promising target for new treatments, according to research published in the journal Oncogene. The Cancer Research UK-funded study looked at molecules in our cells that make sure proteins are folded properly, known as chaperones. The researchers examined the chaperone HSP90, responsible for helping to fold proteins that control cancer cell division. They revealed crucial new details about how the chaperone works alongside a partner — called CDC37 — to carry out its job and keep cancer cells growing.
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TREATMENT


ABOG: Gynecologists may treat men
The New York Times
A professional group that certifies obstetrician-gynecologists reversed an earlier directive and said that its members were permitted to treat male patients for sexually transmitted infections and to screen men for anal cancer. The statement from the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology eased restrictions announced in September, which said that gynecologists could lose their board certification if they treated men. Exceptions were made to allow certain procedures, but screening men who were at high risk for anal cancer was not permitted, so the September decision left some gynecologists struggling to find colleagues in other specialties to treat their male patients and to track those who were enrolled in studies.
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Improving cancer patients' diets
The Boston Globe
Forty-five percent of cancer patients lose weight without trying during treatment, a recent survey of 1,200 patients found. The majority suffer a loss of appetite and energy, changes in smell and taste, and sometimes side effects like constipation, nausea, or bloating. About a quarter of cancer patients — mainly those taking steroids to fight breast cancer — gain weight during treatment. Such weight gain can lead to recurrence, research suggests, while weight loss can undermine recovery.
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HPV


Finances, fear top barriers to teen HPV vaccination
HealthDay News via Clinical Advisor
Financial concerns and parental attitudes are among the top barriers to human papillomavirus vaccination in U.S. adolescents, according to researchers. "Barriers faced by healthcare professionals and parents should be carefully considered when developing strategies to improve HPV vaccine uptake and completion," Dawn M. Holman, MPH, from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues reported in JAMA Pediatrics.
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Female-to-male HPV transmission more common in couples
Healio
New data suggest that HPV transmission occurs more often from women to men in heterosexual partners, highlighting a need for more protection mechanisms for men. "The current study … indicates a need for prevention programs targeted at men," the researchers wrote in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. "This pattern occurred without regard to monogamy or relationship duration."
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