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Screening for cervical cancer: JAMA review of ACOG guidelines
JAMA
In 2012, the US Preventive Services Task Force and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) released updated recommendations on who should be tested for cervical cancer and what types of tests should be done. These recommendations replaced older ones that stated that women should be tested every year — this is no longer the case. In the Dec. 3, 2014, issue of JAMA, a JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis article discusses the ACOG guideline on cervical cancer screening. A summary of the recommendations follows.
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SGO NEWS


Late-breaking abstract submissions open until Feb. 5
SGO is accepting late-breaking abstract submissions for the Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer® now through Feb. 5, 2015. This session will highlight data of the highest scientific impact that has become available since the original 2015 Annual Meeting abstract submission deadline on Sept. 17, 2014. Abstracts already submitted in response to the original Call for Abstracts for the 2015 Annual Meeting are not eligible for resubmission.
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CERVICAL CANCER


How is treatment changing for patients with cervical cancer?
OncLive
Three gynecologic oncologists — Richard T. Penson, MD, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA; Bradley J. Monk, MD, at University of Arizona Cancer Center, Phoenix, Arizona and Krishnansu S. Tewari, MD at University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, California — discuss how cervical cancer treatment is evolving from the cisplatin/radiotherapy current standard of care.
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OVARIAN CANCER


Prophylactic oophorectomy for reducing ovarian cancer risk
OncLive
Prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the best strategy for reducing the risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA-positive women, notes Warner K. Huh, MD, in a video panel discussion called OncLive Peer Exchange. Risk is reduced by over 90 percent in high-risk individuals, adds Robert A. Burger, MD. However, the reduction in risk of ovarian cancer is accompanied by early menopause, and women should receive appropriate counseling, remarks Huh.
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MORCELLATION


Morcellation: Even with benign disease, problems may follow
Medscape (Free login required)
Power morcellation can spread benign uterine disease, increasing morbidity and necessitating more extensive surgery, according to three case reports from Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD. The reports were published in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology. "While there is currently much debate regarding the safety of morcellation techniques in the setting of an undiagnosed malignancy, this series demonstrates the potential risks even in the setting of benign uterine pathology," write Amanda Ramos, MD, Amanda Fader, MD, and Kara Long Roche, MD, all from the Kelly Gynecologic Oncology Service, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins Hospital.
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Point of contention: The debate over morcellation
MedPage Today
Recently, the FDA issued a warning on the use of electromechanical morcellators for various gynecological procedures, saying the devices may spread undiagnosed uterine tumors. Subsequently, HCA Holdings, the largest commercial hospital holding group in the U.S., dropped use of the device. But an expert panel convened at the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL) annual meeting issued their own statement on the subject, which endorsed the continued use of morcellators.
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BREAST CANCER


SABCS: Spotlight on ovarian suppression in breast cancer
MedPage Today
The role of ovarian suppression atop standard anti-estrogen therapy for younger breast cancer survivors will take focus ats the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, where the SOFT trial's randomized comparison of ovarian suppression plus tamoxifen versus tamoxifen alone for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer will be presented. "This is going to be huge because it may contribute to a change in the standard of care," conference co-director Carlos L. Arteaga, MD, told MedPage Today. "This has been a big question of whether ovarian suppression adds to treatment."
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Gene testing in triple-negative breast cancer patients
Medscape (Free login required)
A study of nearly 2000 patients with triple-negative breast cancer has found that nearly 15 percent carry deleterious genetic mutations, lending support to current guidelines that recommend genetic testing in this patient population, say the researchers. The study was published online Dec. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The findings support current practice guidelines in the United States for genetic testing for triple-negative breast cancer. This form of breast cancer, which has little or no expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth-factor 2 receptor, is associated with a worse prognosis than other types of breast cancer.
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Women's Cancer News
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