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Now open: The Obesity Society's abstract submission site for ObesityWeek℠ 2015
TOS
Submit your abstracts for oral and poster presentations at TOS's Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2015. The abstract submission site remains open through May 1, 2015.

Each year, ObesityWeek highlights cutting-edge findings across a broad range of topics — from the basic science of obesity, to treatment and prevention. You won't want to miss this prestigious opportunity to present your research to your esteemed colleagues, industry, media, state and federal health authorities and the public.

You can find a full list of instructions for submitting your abstracts here and access the submission site here. Read more about the submission process in this letter from TOS President Nikhil Dhurandhar, PhD, FTOS.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


Call for 2015 awards nominations
TOS
TOS's awards program promotes, rewards and encourages research in the field of obesity. Awards reflecting different aspects or points in the careers of obesity researchers will be presented at ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles, CA November 2-7, 2015.

TOS encourages you to identify the talented and exceptional people in the field who deserve to be recognized and awarded for their work. You can find descriptions of each award, as well as instructions on how to submit a nomination here.

TOS's Awards Committee will review nominations and winners will be announced by June 12, 2015. Nominees are not required to be TOS members. See a list of previous award recipients here.

The deadline for submitting award nominations is Thursday, April 30, 2015.

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Pat Simons Travel Awards help fund young investigators for travel to ObesityWeek 2015
TOS
As part of its commitment to young investigators in the field of obesity research, each year The Obesity Society awards a number of $500 travel grants to support young investigator attendance at the Annual Meeting. Barbara Rolls, TOS past president, created these special grants after losing her mother, Pat Simons, to an obesity-related disease.

Encouraged by the desire to make a difference in her mother's name, Barbara joined family and friends to identify the most appropriate means to honor her. She long recognized that the origin of her mother's disease was obesity, and while suggestions were made to donate to diabetes or heart associations, Barbara felt it was important to support the great work behind the research, treatment and prevention of obesity — the primary disease that took her mother's life. And, because Pat was an educator, Barbara specifically wanted to support the education of students in the field. With all of this in mind, the Pat Simons Travel Grants were created.

Each year, TOS Council determines the exact number of grants, and winners are selected from the rankings of the abstracts submitted to TOS Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek. Finalists are only required to return a form signed by their institution acknowledging that the winner is either a graduate student or has received a PhD or MD less than 5 years ago. Membership is not required to apply for these grants. If you are interested in applying for one of these grants, be sure that you check the appropriate box when you submit your abstract via the online submission system.

Interested in donating to a Pat Simons travel award? Fill our online donation form here.

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NIH/NIDDK announces two new obesity-related funding opportunities
TOS
The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health recently announced two new obesity-related funding opportunities with a focus on pragmatic research in healthcare.
PAR-13-366: Pragmatic Research in Healthcare Settings to Improve Diabetes Prevention and Care (R18)
PAR-13-367: Planning Grants for Pragmatic Research in Healthcare Settings to Improve Diabetes Prevention and Care (R34)
According to NIDDK, pragmatic trials evaluate the effectiveness of interventions or therapies in research designed to maximize applicability of the trial’s results to routine healthcare situations. Research in response to this funding announcement should test practical and potentially sustainable strategies, delivered in routine clinical care settings, to improve processes of care and health outcomes of individuals who are at risk for or have diabetes. As such, the research should leverage staff and facilities in routine and representative healthcare settings. This leveraging of resources supports the practicality of the intervention and, if effective, approaches tested under routine conditions will have greater potential to be adopted by similar healthcare providers and systems.

Find out more about these opportunities and how to apply in this Q&A.

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Weight discrimination affects quality of life
TOS
New research published in the April issue of Obesity finds that weight discrimination is linked to significantly lower quality of life, and accounts for approximately 40% of the negative psychological effects associated with obesity in older people. The researchers from University College London analyzed data from more than 5,000 English adults over the age of 50, and found that those who felt they had been discriminated against because of their weight had an increase in symptoms of depression, a drop in quality of life and lower life satisfaction compared to those who did not perceive weight discrimination. Examples of discrimination included being treated disrespectfully, receiving poor service in shops and being harassed.

"This research confirms that humiliating people about their weight is part of the obesity problem — not the solution — and shows that weight discrimination doesn't encourage weight loss," said senior author Professor Jane Wardle, director of the Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Centre at UCL.

Read the full paper in Obesity here.

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Early skeletal muscle adaptations to short-term, high-fat diet in humans before changes in insulin sensitivity
Contributed by Susanne Votruba PhD, RD
In rodents and epidemiological studies, obesity has been associated with a modest increase in circulating endotoxin concentrations (metabolic endotoxemia). The suggested mechanism for this is an increase in gut permeability, possibly as a result of a high-fat diet (HFD), leading to a translocation of microbiome-derived lipopolysaccharides into the bloodstream. Whether a HFD increases circulating endotoxins and also produces dysregulated substrate metabolism in non-obese humans in a clinical setting has not, however, been established.

In a new study published in the April issue of Obesity, Anderson et al found that HFD increased postabsorptive endotoxin concentrations and attenuated skeletal muscle homogenate glucose oxidation seen in the fasting-to-fed transition. The changes seen occurred in the absence of changes in insulin sensitivity.

Two studies (n=6/study) of healthy, non-obese males (BMI 22.3±3.9 kg/m2; 21±1 yr) were undertaken. Study 1 examined the effect of a 5 day HFD on skeletal muscle substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity through muscle biopsies and 3-h IVGTT before and after HFD. Study 2 assessed the response of skeletal muscle from a fed-to-fasted state using a HF meal challenge, with pre- and post-skeletal muscle biopsies, before and after the 5 day HFD feeding protocol.

This study is the first to show that in healthy humans without obesity, a short-term, high-fat diet can increase fasting circulating endotoxin concentrations. In a HF meal test, however, acclimation to a HF diet results in the attenuation of the post-prandial increase in endotoxin concentrations. These results indicate that diet can directly influence endotoxin concentrations concurrently with other biological adaptions such as changes glucose oxidation. Read more in the full article here.

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TOS announces winner of member contest
TOS
Last month, TOS held a contest to encourage members to update their contact information in our online database. Congratulations to the winner, Tri Tuyen Cao, MD, from Montague Farm Medical Centre In South Australia who won a free year of TOS membership or a hardcopy of the Guidelines 2013 for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults.

Thank you to all of our members that took the time to participate. If you haven't updated your contact information yet, please make sure to do so in the Member Center.

Do you have a hardcopy of the Guidelines for reference? There's still time to order your hardcopy online. Find more details here.

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Now on demand: Stemming the Diabetes Epidemic — Strategies to Improve Prevention and Treatment
TOS
Top specialists discuss strategies for comprehensive diabetes care. This complimentary webinar titled, Improving Diabetes Care — Rationale and Initial Strategies, is now available on demand. Earn AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Topics include:
  • What defines prediabetes?
  • Lifestyle changes for diabetes prevention: what really works?
  • Three critical interventions you should make following a new diabetes diagnosis
  • Diabetes care resources for your office and your patients
  • Listening to the Patient Voice and engaging patients to help themselves
  • Watch for free here.

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    Get to know a TOS Fellow! Q&A with Nick Finer, FTOS
    Contributed by TOS Early Career Committee

    Professor Nick Finer, FTOS
    It's time for another edition of the Q&A interviews with TOS Fellows! This is the perfect opportunity to get to know leaders in the obesity field a little better, and learn more about their personal lives outside of work. Here are some questions and answers from our interview with TOS Fellow Nick Finer, FTOS, Consultant Endocrinologist and Bariatric Physician at University College Hospital, London, and Honorary Professor in the National Centre for Cardiovascular Preventions and Outcomes within the Institute of Cardiovascular Science at University College London:

    Q: Please tell us about your current work and your professional developmental trajectory.
    A: I have moved between clinical work and academia, from non-diabetic endocrinology to cardiovascular disease, with obesity as the underlying theme. Currently I collaborate on evaluating cohort (observational and interventional) datasets, but increasingly I sit on government and clinical guideline development committees. I now chair World Obesity — Clinical Care.

    Q: What advice do you have for today’s junior obesity researchers?
    A: If your field is in translational research, be prepared to stand up for your work against the dominating forces around diabetes, cardiovascular and other established clinical silos.

    Q: What aspects of obesity research are the most exciting to you right now?
    A: Therapeutics may be moving into a new era with understandings from bariatric surgery and a renewed interest in pharmacotherapy.

    Q: What are your favorite things to do when you're not at work?
    A: I enjoy fine wines and scuba diving.

    Read the rest of the interview with Professor Finer here. These interviews are featured bi-monthly in the TOS eNews. Don't miss the next one on April 18!

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    OBESITY IN THE NEWS


    Project aims to grow local farms, shrink childhood obesity
    Cornell Chronicle
    Cornell nutritional scientists, supported by a grant announced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, plan to test a recipe to lower childhood obesity while boosting the bottom line for farmers. The multistate project, funded at $1 million this year and expected to total $5 million over five years, seeks to increase access to fresh produce for low-income families by subsidizing community-supported agriculture shares and offering a nutrition education program focused on preparation of seasonal crops.
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    Advanced breast cancer more likely in women with diabetes
    Healio
    Diabetes was associated with more advanced breast cancer in a study of Canadian women, according to research published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. The findings from a population-based study point to either more rapidly progressing cancers or barriers to timely detection among women with diabetes, even with adherence to screening recommendations, according to researchers.
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    6 hurdles for the future of obesity
    ConscienHealth
    Obesity is a unique challenge for global health. Other chronic diseases present problems that yield to systematic research, treatment and prevention efforts. Heart disease, diabetes, cancer and HIV have all become steadily more manageable. People affected by these diseases — even if cures might not be possible — can often lead relatively normal lives. For the future of obesity to reach such a state, six hurdles must be cleared.
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    10 reasons to strength train
    Health Central
    All too often the benefits of strength training (also referred to as weight lifting or toning) are overlooked. Women especially fall into a cardio rut and forget to work on sculpting those ever important muscles. Here are 10 key reasons to add strength training to your fitness regimen.
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    3 new ways to boost your dieting willpower
    Prevention
    For the 100 million dieters — who spent more than $60 billion on diet books, drugs, meal replacements, and health clubs last year — losing weight with tactics that don't cost anything might sound too good to be true. Yet new research proves that each of us has the power to resist junk food, drop a few pounds and even exercise more regularly, simply by changing the way we think. Here's what that research can teach you about harnessing your mind to slim down — starting now.
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    A high-fat diet could be altering your behavior and not just your waistline
    Time
    Obesity, heart disease and other physical afflictions may not be the only negative impacts of consuming fatty foods. According to a recent study on mice, high-fat foods could be affecting behavior, increasing the risk of depression and related psychological disorders. The study, published in the journal Biological Psychiatry, suggests that a high-fat diet alters the mix of bacteria in the gut known as the gut microbiome. These changes, researchers from Louisiana State University believe, might be affecting one’s susceptibility to mental illness.
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    French study links lack of sleep with obesity
    Yahoo News
    Sleep disorders and overeating appear to be linked, according to a recent investigation conducted by the French National Institute of Sleep and Vigilance and French health insurer MGEN. Their research indicates an increased risk of being overweight or obese among individuals who fail to get enough sleep. Published ahead of France's National Sleep Day, the study includes data on 49,086 individuals and was carried out as part of the national NutriNet-Santé program, which collects health and nutrition data from volunteers online.
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    The Obesity Society eNews
    Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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    Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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