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What can you look forward to at ObesityWeek 2015?
Letter from the Executive Director
Dear Colleagues,

Summer is approaching and many of us are dreaming of our beach vacations with thoughts of our November 2015 annual meeting, ObesityWeek℠, far from our minds. Meanwhile, our Program Committee, Executive Committee, Council, Committees, Sections and staff continue to work hard to make ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles an extraordinary event.

As many of you have experienced, this weeklong meeting promises world-class, cutting-edge obesity science and education to support you in your work to advance the field, as well as your careers. The collaborative efforts of TOS and ASMBS offer you countless ways to devise an educational schedule that best suits your needs:
  • 100+ sessions provide in-depth education, including CME credits
  • 1500+ research abstract presentations feature cutting-edge findings
  • 5000+ attendees improve your chances for establishing top-notch scientific and medical collaborations
  • 70+ countries attending bring diverse international perspectives
  • 265+ exhibit booths feature the latest products and services for your practice or lab
  • 30+ sponsors and educational grant providers help make the conference an enduring success
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    ASSOCIATION NEWS


    Nominate a colleague for the new Diversity Leadership Award
    TOS
    TOS's Diversity Committee and Diversity Section are pleased to announce the new Diversity Leadership Award, open to all TOS members in good standing. Significant racial and ethnic disparities continue to exist in the occurrence of obesity. This award aims to recognize an investigator whose research has made a significant difference in the field of obesity disparities.

    The winner of the award will be honored with a certificate and plaque at ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles, CA. The recipient of the award will also be recognized here in the eNews, and a formal recognition letter will be sent to the recipient's Dean/Chairperson or Corporate President (if from industry).

    Nominations are due by October 1, 2015. Additional details are available here.

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    Attention ObesityWeek 2015 abstract submitters: Did your co-authors submit their COIs?
    TOS
    Did you submit an abstract to ObesityWeek 2015? If so, be sure to check that all of your co-authors entered their conflict of interest information into the abstract submission system. Only abstracts with conflict of interest information for all authors will be considered for ObesityWeek. The deadline to submit conflict of interest information is this Friday, June 5, at 12:00 pm ET. Please direct any inquiries to apatel@obesity.org. Don't forget to remind your colleagues as well!
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    SPONSORED CONTENT


    ICHNR seeks public comment: National Nutrition Research Roadmap
    TOS
    The National Institutes of Health Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research (ICHNR) seeks public input on the National Nutrition Research Roadmap to identify key questions, topics, and research gaps and opportunities. ICHNR specifically seeks input about short- and long-term research and resource initiatives that would help fill those gaps and opportunities.

    In early 2013, the ICHNR began the process to develop the Roadmap to coordinate federal human nutrition research. The plan seeks to answer three questions to accelerate progress in nutrition research:
    1. How do we better understand and define eating patterns to improve and sustain health?
    2. What can be done to help people choose healthy eating patterns?
    3. How can we engage innovative methods and systems to accelerate discoveries in human nutrition?
    Responses to this notice may be submitted via email to NNRRfeedback@nih.gov or postal mail to the National Institutes of Health, Division of Nutrition Research Coordination, Two Democracy Plaza, Room 635, 6707 Democracy Boulevard - MSC 5461, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-5461.

    To ensure consideration, responses must be received by 11:59pm ET on June 25, 2015. Find out more about the Roadmap and submit your comments here.

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    Free CME/CE opportunity from ADA: hypoglycemia and diabetes
    TOS
    Earn up to 3.75 continuing education credits through a new self-assessment program on hypoglycemia and diabetes from the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The assessment aims to provide you with a better understanding of working with patients with type 2 diabetes, and is designed to objectively assess and strengthen your knowledge of diabetes. The assessment consists of clinical problem-solving multiple choice questions and educational critiques. The ADA developed the content based on the 2013 scientific statement on the same subject issued by the ADA and TES.

    Find additional information here.

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    Half of packaged foods don't meet FDA requirements for 'healthy' items
    Contributed by Health Central
    The American Heart Association has made it clear that too much sodium in your diet can lead to serious problems. While your body does need a particular balance of sodium and water to work properly, too much of either can upset the balance. When you are in good health, your kidneys get rid of extra sodium to ensure that balance.

    Your body needs about 200 mg of sodium per day. The problem here is that the average American eats about 3,000 to 3,600 mg of sodium each day. Too much sodium in the body results in water retention and puts an extra burden on the heart and blood vessels.

    It is recommended that all Americans cut the sodium in their diet to less than 1,500 mg per day. The consequence of excess sodium is high blood pressure, and the consequences of high blood pressure are heart attack or stroke.

    A government study found that less than half of packaged items in grocery stores meet the Food and Drug Administration requirements for what is considered healthy. Their findings coordinate with the fact that more than 90 percent of Americans eat more sodium than recommended. Read the full article here.

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    Attention obesity researchers: Sign up for NIH funding alerts!
    TOS
    Did you know you can sign up to receive weekly funding alerts from the NIH? These emails include notices of new funding opportunities and requests for applications that may be relevant to obesity research. To sign up for the email alerts, send an e-mail to listserv@list.nih.gov with the following text in the body of your email (not the subject line): Subscribe NIHTOC-L your name (Example: Subscribe NIHTOC-L Bill Jones).

    You can also search for specific funding opportunities by keyword here. For example, here are all the funding opportunities with the keyword "obesity."

    For additional information about funding from NIH, visit the NIH Grants Website.

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    eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner
    Contributed by the eHealth/mHealth Section
    To keep the community up to date on the developments in this important area, TOS eHealth/mHealth section offers the eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner. This week's articles include:
    Turner-McGrievy G, Beets MW. Tweet for health: using an online social network to examine temporal trends in weight loss-related posts. Transl Behav Med. 2015 Jun:5(2):160-66.

    Alnasser AA, Alkhalifa AS, Sathiaseelan A., et al. What Overweight Women Want From a Weight Loss App: A Qualitative Study on Arabic Women. JMIR mHealth uHealth. 2015:3(2):e41.

    Boushey CJ, Harray AJ, Kerr DA, et al. How Willing Are Adolescents to Record Their Dietary Intake? The Mobile Food Record. JMIR mHealth uHealth. 2015;3(2):e47.
    If you have an article you would like to share, we would love to hear from you! Please send article information to Danielle Schoffman (schoffmd@email.sc.edu), and we’ll add it to the EMS Reading Corner Library.

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    OBESITY IN THE NEWS


    How Hawaii became one of the healthiest states in the nation
    The Huffington Post
    Hawaii isn't just a nice state for a vacation. It may also be the healthiest state in which to live, at least according to one metric: Only 19 percent of Hawaii residents suffer from obesity. That's the lowest of any state, according to the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index. Hawaii was also one of five states that reduced its obesity rate the most between 2013 and 2014, when the survey was conducted.
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    Pedometer Challenge encourages attendees to compete with their feet
    Associations Now
    There's nothing like a little friendly competition to get people moving, whether on a difficult project, a new idea, or, in the case of The Obesity Society, through the halls of the convention center at its last annual meeting. TOS colocates its annual ObesityWeek conference with the annual meeting of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. In keeping with their emphasis on healthy lifestyles, TOS and ASMBS went head-to-head in their first Pedometer Challenge at last year's event in Boston.
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    Do mini-packaged snacks help you eat less junk?
    PLOS Blogs
    In recent years countless food manufacturers have been "sub-packaging" their foods into smaller portions in an apparent effort to curb folks from overindulging. You can usually find 100 kcal multi-packs of chips, pretzels, chocolates, and all sorts of junk foods. Despite the very obvious negative environmental impact of all this excess packaging, what, if any, impact does such packaging have on people's consumption?
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    Obesity and well-being: Why diet and exercise alone may not be enough to slow America's growing weight problem
    The Washington Post
    America's obesity epidemic is getting worse and it appears to be tied up with a poorer overall sense of well-being. The obesity rate rose last year, to 27.7 percent, according to a massive Gallup and Healthways survey of more than 175,000 Americans nationwide. That rate is 2.2 points higher than where it was in 2008, when the survey was launched, with higher rates associated with lower well-being scores overall, Gallup and Healthways found.
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    ASCO obesity initiative: How does obesity affect cancer outcomes?
    Cancer Network
    Jennifer Ligibel, M.D., is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and a senior physician in the women's cancer program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. Dr. Ligibel discusses ASCO's obesity initiative at the meeting in a session that talks about the link between cancer, obesity and exercise.
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    Obesity increases risk for common heart rhythm disorder
    Reuters
    Obesity increases the risk for atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder that can lead to blood clots, stroke and heart failure, a new analysis suggests. Researchers reviewed data from 51 previously published studies covering more than 600,000 people and found that obesity also made it more likely that patients with atrial fibrillation would have complications after surgery to treat the condition.
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    I'm a plus-sized woman. I never want to hear 'I'm proud of you' for exercising.
    The Washington Post
    Allison McCarthy writes: On a bright spring day last month, I completed the 5K Color Run in Baltimore. In just over an hour, I walked the entire course while my friend, a longtime pal from college, joined the runners. She waited for me at the finish line with a smile. We took pictures of ourselves covered in glitter and a veritable rainbow of chalk dust. "I'm proud of you!" she said. And I grinned. But then she kept saying it. Over and over and over: "I'm so proud of you for doing this."
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    In the breastfeeding war, objectivity suffers
    ConscienHealth
    The passions of the breastfeeding war continue to spill into scientific publications. Another in a long line of publications documenting an association between breastfeeding and lower adiposity appeared in the Journal of Nutrition. The authors concluded: These data confirm the importance of exclusive BF and prolonged BF for later cardiometabolic health. But in fact, that's not exactly true. As the authors note, "The observational design of the study does not allow inference of causality." Yet they stuck an inference of causality into their conclusion.
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    Fitness, weight improvements lead to changes in adiponectin levels
    Healio
    Changes in adiponectin levels in adults with overweight or obesity and diabetes were associated with improvements in fitness and weight with intensive lifestyle intervention, according to recent study findings published in Diabetes Care. However, the researchers said future studies are needed to determine whether the observations are linked to sex-specific biological determinants.
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    The Obesity Society eNews
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    Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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