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TOS's late breaking abstract submission for ObesityWeek℠ opens August 3
TOS
Do you have new, high-impact obesity research that you want to present at ObesityWeek? If so, your opportunity to submit it to TOS’s Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek is open August 3 - 17! Researchers who have data that was not available or fully analyzed in May 2015 are eligible for TOS's late breaking abstract submission.

Late breaking abstracts can be submitted to one of following tracks:
  • Metabolism and Integrative Physiology
  • Neuroscience
  • Interventional & Clinical Studies
  • Population Health
  • Policy
  • Abstracts are reviewed by our team of experts and accepted for either poster or oral presentations. Look for the opening of the submission site here on August 3, and find more about late breaking abstract requirements here.
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    ASSOCIATION NEWS


    Do you really think you're a foodie? Profiling the adventurous eater
    Contributed by Cornell University
    Think you're a foodie? Adventurous eaters, known as "foodies," are often associated with indulgence and excess. However, a new Cornell Food and Brand Lab study published in Obesity shows just the opposite: adventurous eaters weigh less and may be healthier than their less-adventurous counterparts.

    The nationwide U.S. survey of 502 women showed that those who had eaten the widest variety of uncommon foods — including seitan, beef tongue, Kimchi, rabbit, and polenta — also rated themselves as healthier eaters, more physically active, and more concerned with the healthfulness of their food when compared with non-adventurous eaters.

    "They also reported being much more likely to have friends over for dinner," said lead author and TOS member Lara Latimer, PhD, formerly at the Cornell Food and Brand Lab and now at the University of Texas.

    "These findings are important to dieters because they show that promoting adventurous eating may provide a way for people — especially women — to lose or maintain weight without feeling restricted by a strict diet," said coauthor Brian Wansink. He advises, "Instead of sticking with the same boring salad, start by adding something new. It could kick start a more novel, fun and healthy life of food adventure."

    The full article is published in the August issue of Obesity and is available here. It is authored by former Cornell researchers, Lara Latimer, PhD, (currently a Lecturer at the University of Texas at Austin) and Lizzy Pope, PhD, RD (currently Assistant Professor at the University of Vermont), and Brian Wansink, (Professor and Director of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University).

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    Submit nominations for TOS's Diversity Leadership Award before August 7
    Contributed by TOS Diversity Committee & Section
    Don't forget to nominate a colleague for TOS's Diversity Leadership Award before August 7! Developed by TOS's Diversity Committee and Diversity Section, the award is open to all TOS members in good standing.

    Significant racial and ethnic disparities continue to exist in the occurrence of obesity. This award aims to recognize an investigator whose research has made a significant difference in the field of obesity disparities.

    The winner of the award will be honored with a certificate and plaque at ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles, CA. The recipient of the award will also be recognized here in the eNews, and a formal recognition letter will be sent to the recipient's Dean/Chairperson or Corporate President (if from industry).

    Additional details are available here.

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    SPONSORED CONTENT


    Pre-order ObesityWeek on Demand and save $600
    TOS
    Again this year, key content from ObesityWeek will be available in a CME accredited online program with ObesityWeek on Demand. Order now and save $600 off the regular price.

    ObesityWeek on Demand contains approximately 120 hours of presentations covering a multi-track schedule of topics including abstract presentations, partner symposia, educational courses, video sessions and more. ObesityWeek on Demand makes continuing education easy with online access, a USB drive for offline access, and downloadable MP3 and PDF files.

    Features of ObesityWeek on Demand include:
  • Recorded presentations as soon as 24 hours after live session
  • Cloud-based online access from any computer or mobile device
  • Advanced Search (find any word on any slide)
  • Recently Viewed (revisit presentations and pick up where you left off)
  • Downloadable MP3 audio files (listen to presentations on the go)
  • Printable PDFs of presentations (for easier note taking and review)
  • CME available
  • USB drive for offline viewing

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    Calling all early career investigators: Register for the Early Career Academic Pre-Conference Workshop
    TOS
    As a pre-conference session to ObesityWeek 2015, TOS offers the Early Career Academic Workshop. This is a free workshop held on Tuesday, Nov. 3 from 2:30 – 5:00pm that will provide hands-on, interactive activities to help build confidence and skills for early investigators.

    Activities include a panel presentation on grant writing with NIH staff and roundtable discussions on topics including building a research program, negotiating your first faculty position, and writing high-impact manuscripts. All in academia or considering an academic path are invited. More information about the workshop is available here. Add it to your registration today!

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    Nov. 2 & 3: TOS gets you ready for the American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) Certification Exam
    TOS
    Certification as a Diplomate by the American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) distinguishes a physician as having achieved a high level of competency and understanding in obesity care.

    As a pre-conference to ObesityWeek, TOS offers a Review Course for the ABOM exam for 15.5 CME credits. Taught by the industry's top educators, the course is designed to strengthen physicians' obesity knowledge and offers sample exam questions, didactic lectures, and a 100-page educational workbook for attendees to take home.

    ObesityWeek attendees may use the CME credits from the meeting to count toward their 60 CME credits required to sit for the ABOM exam, even though the conference takes place after ABOM's final application deadline of August 24. Find out more.

    Register for ObesityWeek 2015 and TOS's Review Course for the ABOM Exam here.

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    NIDDK seeks Director for Pediatric Clinical Obesity Research
    Contributed by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
    The Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition (DDDN), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) is seeking a physician or doctoral level scientist/clinician with expertise in clinical obesity research to provide leadership for our Pediatric Clinical Obesity Program.

    The position involves an active role in stimulating new research and managing complex multi-center research endeavors that reflect the dramatic expansion of clinical research opportunities related to the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of pediatric obesity. The Pediatric Clinical Obesity Program Director will provide scientific and administrative leadership for integration and coordination of efforts of NIH sponsored clinical studies, clinical trials, and consortia investigating the etiology, prevention, and treatment of obesity in children, including medical, surgical, and behavioral treatments.

    The Program Director will actively assess needs and opportunities for research, help set research priorities, and provide leadership in development of studies in important areas. In carrying out these responsibilities, the Program Director will interact with national leaders in research on childhood obesity and its complications. Many DDDN research activities are conducted through partnerships between the NIDDK, other components of NIH and DHHS, and voluntary organizations. The Program Director will play a leadership role in fostering these partnerships.

    Applicants must be U.S. citizens, resident aliens, or nonresident aliens with an employment-authorized visa, and have an advanced degree (M.D., Ph.D. or equivalent) along with relevant independent research experience in clinical research on obesity or related disorders, preferably with an emphasis on children/adolescents.

    The position is located in Bethesda, Maryland. Salary and benefits will be commensurate with the experience of the applicant.

    Applicants should submit a complete curriculum vitae and bibliography along with a cover letter outlining clinical and research experience. Address applications to: Susan Yanovski, M.D., NIDDK Division of Digestive Diseases, Two Democracy Plaza, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Room 675, MSC5450, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-5450, email: sy29f@nih.gov.

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    eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner
    Contributed by the eHealt h/mHealth Section
    To keep the community up to date on the developments in this important area, TOS eHealth/mHealth section offers the eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner. This week's articles include:
    Seo DC, Niu J. Evaluation of Internet-Based Interventions on Waist Circumference Reduction: A Meta-Analysis. J Med Internet Res. 2015 Jul 21;17(7):e181.

    Sharma SV, Shegog R, Chow J, et al. Effects of the Quest to Lava Mountain Computer Game on Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors of Elementary School Children: A Pilot Group-Randomized Controlled Trial. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2015 Apr 23. [Epub ahead of print]

    Mohr DC, Schueller SM, Riley WT, et al. Trials of Intervention Principles: Evaluation Methods for Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies. J Med Internet Res. 2015 Jul 8;17(7):e166.
    If you have an article you would like to share, we would love to hear from you! Please send article information to Danielle Schoffman (schoffmd@email.sc.edu), and we'll add it to the EMS Reading Corner Library.

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    OBESITY IN THE NEWS


    How changing attitudes went along with a drop in calories
    The New York Times
    Fifteen years ago, in July 2000, a Newsweek cover depicted an overweight boy clutching a giant, melting ice cream cone. "Fat for Life?" read the headline. The Newsweek cover was striking, but not unique. The early 2000s featured a series of obesity-themed magazine covers. Most depicted children. America had its misgivings about excess weight, even as it packed on the pounds. There have been fitness booms and diet crazes for decades. But in the early 2000s, something changed, many public health experts say: Many people started seeing obesity as a health crisis instead of a personal problem.
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    Americans are finally eating less
    The New York Times
    After decades of worsening diets and sharp increases in obesity, Americans’ eating habits have begun changing for the better. Calories consumed daily by the typical American adult, which peaked around 2003, are in the midst of their first sustained decline since federal statistics began to track the subject, more than 40 years ago. The number of calories that the average American child takes in daily has fallen even more — by at least 9 percent.
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    It's hard to count calories, even for researchers
    The New York Times
    If you've ever tried to use one of those dieting apps, you probably know the pitfalls of the government survey that most researchers use to evaluate Americans' eating habits. It's really hard to keep track of what you've eaten. Our goal in this article is to explain the data that we used in our story about the recent decline in Americans' calorie consumption. As that article said, none of the calorie-measuring studies we examined are perfect. But findings from all three have areas substantial overlap, giving researchers confidence that the changes are real.
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    New food labels aim to help you eat less sugar
    The Verge
    Not only does the U.S. Food and Drug Administration want nutritional labels to contain the amount of added sugars in food, the agency is proposing that labels print the percentage of recommended daily intake, too. Added sugars — ones that food manufacturers put in their products when they process them — shouldn't exceed 10 percent of calories consumed, according to the FDA. In a 2,000-calorie daily diet, the standard used for nutritional labels, that's 200 calories, tops — or about 50 grams (around 10 teaspoons) of sugar.
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    The last acceptable discrimination?
    Examiner
    Some fifty years ago in 1964, Lyndon Johnson signed The Civil Rights Act, barring discrimination on race in any public place or institution. This Act also specified that employment decisions cannot be based on race, color or creed. The law has been modified over time with additional clauses that forbid discrimination in pregnancy, age, sexual orientation, the physically challenged, veterans and more. But there is one category of job candidates that is not protected by law. People who are obese can suffer the consequences of "weight stigma," in and out of the employment environment.
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    'Bad genes' may cause teens to binge-eat: DNA determines behaviors
    Science World Report
    "Bad genes" may actually lead to binge-eating. Scientists have found that binge-eating in teenagers may be linked to a gene variation. Binge-eating can be a serious issue. It involves eating large quantities of food all at once, and is often associated with fasting for long periods, as well. Better understanding this condition could allow researchers to develop more targeted treatments.
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    Obesity responsible for over 20 percent of total US health care bill
    Examiner
    Obesity is responsible for 20 percent of the total healthcare tab, say experts. PharmacoEconomics pooled data from the gamut of professionals in the health care industry, stakeholders, policy makers and researchers, According to Business Wire, the consensus is simple: obesity might be the single deadliest disease and it's certainly the most expensive. Being overweight drives heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol problems, back and leg problems, sleep apnea, disability and a host of other related conditions.
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    Is obesity a disease? 3 answers
    ConscienHealth
    It's been two years since the American Medical Association declared that obesity a disease that merits medical attention. What has been the impact on thinking? The answer depends upon where you look and who you ask. It's fairly clear that the general public hasn't shifted to viewing obesity primarily as a medical problem.
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    Restaurant food as unhealthy as fast food
    HealthCentral
    Eating in full-service restaurants is not that much healthier than eating fast food, according to a new study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. It found that restaurant fare, whether at fast food chains or fine dining, results in more calories and fat and sodium consumption than a home-cooked meal.
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    Texas Tech researcher studies role of eggs in weight loss
    Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
    Can eggs play a role in losing weight? That's the question Nik Dhurandhar, chairman of the Texas Tech Department of Nutritional Sciences, will be seeking to answer with grant money from the American Egg Board to study whether eating eggs for breakfast while on a diet can contribute to greater weight loss. Previous studies suggest eggs can help reduce weight. That could be because of the higher quality of protein found in eggs.
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    The Obesity Society eNews
    Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
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    Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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