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Call for action: Sign the Treat Obesity Seriously pledge
Special Letter from the President
Dear Colleagues,

With two out of three adults in the United States affected by obesity or overweight, The Obesity Society (TOS) continues our efforts to encourage the treatment of obesity as a serious disease, like heart disease and cancer. Today, I appeal to you to show your support for treating obesity seriously by signing the Obesity Pledge.

Your signature helps support our efforts to educate policymakers, care providers and the public on the need to recognize obesity as a serious disease. Further, it will help facilitate the passage of policies at both the state and federal levels that improve coverage of and access to obesity treatments.

Upon signing the pledge, we hope that you will take it a step further by spreading the word to your friends and colleagues on social media. To facilitate this, below we've included a pledge cover photo and profile image, as well as a series of share graphics. By taking the simple step to update your Facebook page with these images you are adding substantially to the visibility of the cause, and supporting TOS as we take this campaign to the next level.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


ObesityWeek℠ 2015 early registration closes Aug. 21
TOS
The third annual ObesityWeek conference will take place at the Los Angeles Convention Center, Nov. 2 – 7, 2015. In addition to joint sessions and keynotes, a single registration fee covers both TOS and ASMBS meeting sessions and events. Register for ObesityWeek 2015 before Friday, Aug. 21 to take advantage of early registration rates. ASMBS and TOS members get discounted rates by entering ASMBS or TOS username when registering. Join today and save!

Don't forget to plan your ObesityWeek itinerary using our interactive schedule. See you in L.A.!

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Protein-packed breakfast prevents body fat gain in overweight teens
Contributed by the University of Missouri Health System
University of Missouri researchers compared the benefits of consuming a normal-protein breakfast to a high-protein breakfast and found the high-protein breakfast — which contained 35 grams of protein — prevented gains of body fat, reduced daily food intake and feelings of hunger, and stabilized glucose levels among overweight teens who would normally skip breakfast. The study is published in the Obesity journal.

Heather Leidy, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology at the MU School of Medicine and lead author of the study, says the key to eating 35 grams of protein is to consume a combination of high-quality proteins including milk, eggs, lean meats and Greek yogurt.

Read the full study here.

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Calling all early career investigators: Register for the Early Career Academic Pre-Conference Workshop
TOS
As a pre-conference session to ObesityWeek 2015, TOS offers the Early Career Academic Workshop. This is a free workshop held on Tuesday, Nov. 3 from 2:30 – 5:00 pm that will provide hands-on, interactive activities to help build confidence and skills for early investigators.

Activities include a panel presentation on grant writing with NIH staff and roundtable discussions on topics including building a research program, negotiating your first faculty position, and writing high-impact manuscripts. All in academia or considering an academic path are invited. More information about the workshop is available here. Add it to your registration today!

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New provider education tools available from STOP Obesity Alliance
Contributed by ABOM
The Strategies to Overcome and Prevent (STOP) Obesity Alliance recently launched a series of educational videos for healthcare providers as part of its continued effort to improve communication with patients affected by obesity. The information is based on STOP's Why Weight? A Guide to Discussing Obesity & Health With Your Patients, a unique tool designed to help providers build a safe and trusting environment for patients to facilitate open, productive conversations about weight. This series is part of a larger effort STOP is making to improve the patient experience and educate health care providers. The Why Weight? A Guide to Discussing Obesity & Health With Your Patients series of information is available at www.WhyWeightGuide.org.

Scott Kahan, MD, MPH, member of TOS and the American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM), serves as STOP's medical director and is featured in the video series, including a dramatization on what health care providers should not do when addressing a patient's weight.

"One of the most common concerns I hear from physicians is that they have no training in how to talk to patients about weight and obesity," says Dr. Kahan. “We created this resource to fill this hole. I hope that physicians and patients alike can benefit from the insights, tools, and guidance in the Why Weight? website."

Find out more about the Why Weight? tool here. Find out more about ABOM here.

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Get to know a TOS Fellow! Q&A with Aaron Kelly, PhD, FTOS
Contributed by TOS Early Career Committee

Aaron Kelly, PhD, FTOS
It's time for another edition of the Q&A interviews with TOS Fellows! This is the perfect opportunity to get to know leaders in the obesity field a little better and learn more about their personal lives outside of work. Here are some questions and answers from our interview with TOS Fellow Aaron Kelly, PhD, FTOS, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine University of Minnesota.

Q: Can you tell us about your current work and your professional developmental trajectory?
A: My research focuses on the clinical aspects of pediatric obesity (pediatric obesity medicine). Current projects include assessing the vascular status of children and adolescents with severe obesity, pediatric obesity pharmacotherapy clinical trials, and evaluation of vascular outcomes following bariatric surgery in adolescents.

Q: What advice do you have for today's junior obesity researchers?
A: Select your mentors carefully. Identify successful researchers who also have a strong track record of mentoring. Solicit feedback from your mentors about the areas and ideas that have the most promise and focus on those. Don't over-extend yourself by trying to pursue all the opportunities that come your way. Be selective and focus your efforts on the areas that are fundable and hold promise to make a meaningful impact in the field.

Q: What aspects of obesity research are the most exciting to you right now?
A: The increasing availability and growing pipeline of new weight loss drugs provides exciting opportunities to examine how pharmacotherapy can be used to improve obesity outcomes. In particular, opportunities exist to identify predictors of response to specific agents in an effort to tailor medical management of obesity.

Q: What are your favorite things to do when you're not at work?
A: I enjoy spending time with my wife and two girls. Gymnastics rules the day at our house. Between my wife coaching and both of my girls on the team, I've learned a few things about the interesting and unique culture of gymnastics.

Read the rest of the interview with Dr. Kelly here. These interviews are featured bi-monthly in the TOS eNews. Don't miss the next one on Sept. 2!

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Research: For fat loss, low-fat diets beat low-carb diets handily
Los Angeles Times
It is a central dogma of the low-carb lifestyle: that while avoiding carbohydrates will force the human body into fat-burning mode, any diet that fails to suppress insulin will trap body fat in place and thwart a dieter's hope of shifting to a leaner, healthier body type. But researchers from the National Institutes of Health have found that the hallowed creed of Atkins acolytes doesn't hold up in the metabolic lab, where dieters can't cheat and respiratory quotients don't lie.
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'Body' report cards aren't influencing Arkansas teenagers
The New York Times
It is one of the boldest and most controversial tactics in the battle against childhood obesity: A growing number of schools are monitoring their students' weight and sending updates home, much like report cards. Nine states require schools to send such notifications, sometimes called "BMI letters," or less charitably "fat letters." But a new study of the first state to adopt the practice shows that the letters have had almost no effect, at least on older teenagers.
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The government is waffling on its breakfast warning
Minneapolis Star Tribune
The notion that skipping breakfast can keep you from losing weight is such a widely accepted principle that it is enshrined in the U.S. Dietary Guidelines, the federal government’s advice book, which recommends having breakfast every day because “not eating breakfast has been associated with excess body weight.” But it’s very likely not true.
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Medicaid offers nutrition counseling to combat obesity in South Carolina
The Associated Press via News & Observer
Poor, obese South Carolinians covered by Medicaid can get help slimming down through nutritional counseling sessions aimed at stemming chronic and costly health problems. The Department of Health and Human Services added the weight-loss services this month for the estimated 184,000 Medicaid-covered adults with a body mass index of 30 or more, which is the definition of obese. That roughly translates to a 5-foot-8 adult weighing more than 200 pounds.
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Woman writes awesome open letter to man who called her fat while jogging
People
When Lindsey Swift went for a run with her boyfriend, a random man leaned out his car window and shouted nasty comments about her weight. Initially shaken, the U.K.-based Swift refused to feel ashamed of her body — or to let her harasser have the last word. So, she took to Facebook to write an open letter dedicated to "the idiot who thought it was O.K. to heckle" her with fat jokes and explain why body-shaming is never, ever okay.
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Trans fats, but not saturated fats, linked to risk of death
Reuters
A large new review of existing research suggests that for healthy people, a reasonable amount of saturated fat in the diet poses no health risk. Trans fats, on the other hand, were associated with an increased risk of death from any cause, death from cardiovascular disease and a diagnosis of coronary heart disease.
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For evolving brains, a 'paleo' diet of carbs
The New York Times
You are what you eat, and so were your ancient ancestors. But figuring out what they actually dined on has been no easy task. There are no Pleistocene cookbooks to consult. Instead, scientists must sift through an assortment of clues, from the chemical traces in fossilized bones to the scratch marks on prehistoric digging sticks.
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How your brain controls your weight
ConscienHealth
Randy Seeley opened the educational program for the fourth annual Your Weight Matters National Convention by diving into neuroscience. With exceptional clarity, he explained how your brain controls your weight — just like it controls your body temperature and your breathing.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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