This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




Advertisement
Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit August 27, 2014

Home   About   Membership   Meetings and Events   Education   Certification   Job Center   Contact Us        


Advertisement

Advertisement
 

Advertisement

Vote now for the 2014 TOS elections!
TOS
Attention TOS members: now is your chance to vote in the 2014 TOS Council and Nominating Committee Elections. Current Fellows and regular members of TOS are now able to cast their ballot. The election, which opened on Monday, August 25, will close on Thursday, September 4. You can find more information about casting your vote here. Please note you can only submit the e-ballot one time.

In order to vote for the Society's new leaders, you will need to ensure your membership status is up to date. To verify your membership status, access TOS Member Center here.

This year (as always!) we have an outstanding group of candidates for you to consider for the following positions on Council: Vice President, Clinical Practice Councilor, Councilor At-Large and Councilor At-Large: Representative to Mexico. There are also three open positions on the Nominating Committee. TOS members will have the opportunity to review the candidates' statements in the e-ballot prior to voting.

Please contact Jean McMahon, Governance and Executive Assistant at governance@obesity.org or 240-485-1955, if you have questions regarding the election process.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Advertisement


ASSOCIATION NEWS


Research spotlight: Brains benefit from weight loss
TOS
New research published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism shows weight loss from bariatric surgery can improve brain functionality and possibly reduce risks of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers from the University of São Paolo in São Paolo, Brazil.

The study examined the brain activity of 17 women with obesity before and after bariatric surgery, and compared the results to women of a normal weight. Before the surgery, the researchers found that the women with obesity had areas in their brain that metabolized sugars at a higher rate than the brains of women without obesity. This increased brain activity did not result in improved cognitive performance, which suggests obesity may force the brain to work harder to achieve the same level of cognition.

Once participants lost significant amounts of weight through bariatric surgery, this excess brain activity was brought down to normal levels. The part of the brain that was affected is tied to cognitive functions such as planning, strategizing and organizing; however it is also linked with Alzheimer's disease. Researchers think that losing significant weight through bariatric surgery can not only improve cognitive brain functionality, but can also lead to reduced risk in Alzheimer's disease.

Read the full study here.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Submit your papers today for the Appetite journal's special weight stigma issue
TOS
It is well known that weight stigma and discrimination can be detrimental to the health of individuals with obesity. To help combat this issue, the editors of the journal Appetite are creating a special weight bias issue to examine the relationship between weight stigma and eating behaviors.

The special issue aims to advance this field of research by bringing together new findings about weight stigma and eating behaviors. Multidisciplinary approaches and perspectives are welcome.

Interested researchers can submit their papers here between August 2014 and September 2015. The issue is expected to publish in January 2016. Additional information and submission requirements are available here.

You can also read more about The Obesity Society's efforts to reduce weight bias here.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Advertisement
SPONSORED CONTENT


Calling all obesity educators: the Obesity Medical Education Interest Group is looking for you!
TOS
The new Obesity Medical Education Interest Group (OME Interest Group) will bring educators together to share and discuss interactive curricula for obesity medical education. With the diversity of its membership, we believe TOS's educators can provide a significant pedagogical contribution to medical and allied health universities and postgraduate teaching institutions.

The OME Interest Group will have its inaugural meeting during ObesityWeek on Wednesday, November 5 from 7:00 - 8:00 am at the Westin Hotel to discuss and develop the agenda for the coming year. If you are interested in attending, please contact Deborah Bell at dbell@obesity.org to receive further information.

We look forward to meeting you at ObesityWeek!

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner
TOS
To keep the community up to date on the developments in this important area, TOS eHealth/mHealth section offers the eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner. This week's articles include:
    Tang J, Abraham C, Stamp E, Greaves C. How can weight-loss app designers’ best engage and support users? A qualitative investigation. British Journal of Health Psychology. 2014;Epub ahead of print. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25130682

    Bond DS, Thomas JG, Raynor HA, Moon J, Sieling J, Trautvetter J, Leblond T, Wing RR.B-MOBILE—a smartphone-based intervention to reduce sedentary time in overweight/obese individuals: a within-subjects experimental trial. PLoS One. 2014;9(6):e100821. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24964010

    Levine DM, Savarimuthu S, Squires A, Nicholson J, Jay M. Technology-assisted weight loss interventions in primary care: A systematic review. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2014;Epub ahead of print. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25134692
If you have an article you would like to share, we would love to hear from you! Please send article information to Anne Gilmore (anne.gilmore@pbrc.edu), and we'll add it to the EMS Reading Corner Library.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Advertisement


Teens who don't sleep well have higher obesity risk
Contributed by HealthCentral
Teens who get less than six hours of sleep a night are 20 percent more likely to be obese by age 21, according to new research from Columbia University and the University of North Carolina.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 10,000 American teens and young adults, ages 16 and 21, as part of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. They collected information on height, weight and sleep during home visits in 1995 and 2001.

The scientists found that nearly one-fifth of the 16-year-olds reported getting fewer than six hours of sleep. This group was 20 percent more likely to be obese by age 21, compared to teens who got more than eight hours of sleep. Read more here.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Obesity beliefs, anti-fat attitudes impact reactions to media
Healio
Pre-existing attitudes toward obesity, including beliefs about the amount of control people have over their body weight, determine reactions to related humor in TV and film, according to research published in Psychology of Popular Media Culture.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Follow that cell
National Institutes of Health
The National Institutes of Health is challenging science innovators to compete for prizes totaling up to $500,000, by developing new ways to track the health status of a single cell in complex tissue over time. The NIH Follow that Cell Challenge External Web Site Policy seeks tools that would, for example, monitor a cell in the process of becoming cancerous, detect changes due to a disease-causing virus, or track how a cell responds to treatment.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Today's parents less able to spot obesity in their kids
HealthDay News
Parents have become less able to realize when their child is overweight or obese, a new study finds. In fact, parents interviewed between 2005 and 2010 were 24 percent less likely to spot a weight problem in their child than parents interviewed between 1988 and 1994, the researchers said. The report was published online in the journal Pediatrics.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


What your commute might have to do with your body weight
Daily Rx via The Huffington Post
Over one-third of adults in the United Sates are obese, and many other nations struggle with obesity. One weight-loss strategy may come from something most people do every day — the daily commute. Commuters have many available modes of transportation — like driving, walking and taking the subway — that can positively or negatively affect their fitness.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 

The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
Contribute news

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
Contribute news

Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

This edition of The Obesity Society eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues

Aug. 13, 2014
Aug. 6, 2014
July 30, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063