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TOS election results: The votes are in!
TOS
Thank you to all who voted and congratulations to the new TOS Council & Nominating Committee Members.

Council:
  • Vice President: Allen Levine, PhD, FTOS
  • Council – Clinical Practice: Leah Whigham, PhD, FTOS
  • Council – At-Large: Timothy H. Moran, PhD, FTOS
  • Council – At-Large: Mexico: Margaríta Terán-García, MD, PhD, FTOS
Nominating Committee:
  • Basic Science: Tim Bartness, PhD
  • Bio-Behavioral: Jennifer Fisher, PhD
  • Clinical: Blandine Laferrére, MD
The terms for the newly elected candidates will begin at ObesityWeek 2014, Nov. 2 -7, 2014.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


Making sense of conflicting diet studies: One-size-fits-all is not the answer
Contributed by Jason Block, MD, MPH
Several recent editions of scientific and medical journals brought a wealth of diet studies, with some conflicting conclusions. The first study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, was a randomized controlled trial of 148 participants with obesity, comparing a low-fat diet (< 30% calories from fat, 55% from carbs) to a low-carb diet (digestible carbs < 40 g/day). Over 1 year, those on the low-fat diet lost 1.8 kg and those in the low carb diet lost 5.3 kg, for a difference of 3.5 kg. Those on the low carb diet also had greater improvements in their cholesterol levels and their future risk for cardiovascular events.

Released on the heels of this study, JAMA published a meta-analysis of 48 randomized trials of weight loss programs, incorporating over 7000 individuals with overweight or obesity; 25 of the studies examined weight loss at one year, which included over 5000 individuals. At one year, the effect of low fat diets (e.g., Ornish) and low carb diets (e.g., Atkins, South Beach) was similar with median weight loss of 7.27 kg and 7.25 kg, respectively, compared to individuals not on a diet. Both low fat and low carb diets led to somewhat more weight loss than balanced diets (e.g., Jenny Craig, Weight Watchers). At six months, low carb diets led to more weight loss than all other diets.

What should people seeking to lose weight do with this conflicting information? There is some evidence that especially over the short-term, low carbohydrate diets might lead to more rapid weight loss than other diets. But, on balance, results for low carb and low fat diets are similar at one year. Ultimately, reality matters more than specific study outcomes. Weight loss is not a sprint but a marathon. Biological and hormonal changes after weight loss lead most people to regain lost weight. Maintaining weight loss requires sustaining dietary changes over the long term, with as much attention to dietary changes and exercise after losing weight as before. Individuals should choose the diet they can sustain, not just for one year but long beyond, upon considering their lifestyle, taste preferences, and culture. A one-size-fits-all approach to weight loss is not the answer in the long run.

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Take Action! Encourage HHS to support coverage of obesity treatments
Urge your house member to sign the Johnson/Blumenauer letter
Earlier this Summer, Representatives Johnson (D-TX) and Blumenauer (D-OR) circulated a sign-on letter to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that encourages HHS to support coverage of obesity treatment services in state health exchange plans.

We're calling on you to send a message to your House Representatives — urging them to sign on the Johnson/Blumenauer letter to HHS before the September 11 deadline. We strongly encourage you to include your personal story in the message to help your legislators better understand the need for state health exchange plans to provide equal and fair coverage for critical obesity treatment tools. Find out more about how to send an electronic letter in TOS’s advocacy engagement center.

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  Visit the Obesity Hyperguide™ Booth #1034
Are you attending TOS’s 2014 Annual Scientific Meeting? Join us at the Obesity Hyperguide™ booth to explore how you can earn free CME credit and improve your clinical practice with this unique online learning platform. Informational materials detailing registration, activity options, and customizable features will be available onsite.
 


Nationwide educational campaign aims to help patients understand triglyceride levels
TOS
As part of National Cholesterol Education Month, the National Lipid Association (NLA) announces a nationwide educational campaign, Learn Your Lipids, to encourage patient education and drive discussions on lipid management. The organization is asking healthcare providers to inform at-risk patients about the impact of proper treatment and prevention of complications for their entire lipid profile — not limited to cholesterol, but also in terms of elevated triglyceride levels.

According to NLA President Terry A. Jacobson, MD, elevated triglyceride levels "may unsuspectingly affect patients' health, even if they look and feel healthy."

NLA is working to ensure clinicians have the tools needed to help patients better understand how triglycerides relate to health, and have developed the "What's Your Number" tear sheet for patients and an educational infographic. We encourage you to share this information with your friends, colleagues and patients.

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Additive effect of dietary prescriptions may optimize weight regulation
Contributed by Susan F. Franks, PhD, ABPP
Dietary guidelines addressing obesity are based on the notion that healthy weight is maintained by eating in ways that balance energy intake and expenditure. A recent study by Urban and colleagues is the first to investigate the independent and additive role of commonly recommended specific dietary strategies on energy balance.

Dietary choices made by 151 adult subjects during their first two days of stay at a research center as part of the Tufts Twin Study of energy regulation were evaluated. Subjects selected meals and snacks from a choice of 97 typical foods. Researchers analyzed percent of energy from carbohydrates, fat, protein, and nondairy beverages; total fiber; energy density; dietary variety; and glycemic index.

A favorable energy balance (lower energy intake relative to predicted energy requirement) was found for subjects who selected a higher percentage from protein but a lower percentage from nondairy beverages, as well as foods lower in energy density, variety, and glycemic index. Subjects who selected foods that were favorable for only one or two parameters had less favorable energy balance. This new research suggests that healthy weight regulation may be optimized by the use of multiple dietary strategies. Read the full article in the Obesity journal.

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Normal-weight counselors feel more success in helping patients with obesity
TOS
A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, led by TOS member Sara Bleich, PhD, suggests that normal weight nutrition and exercise counselors report feeling significantly more successful in getting patients with obesity to lose weight than their heavier counterparts. The report on the findings, published online in the journal Obesity, suggests that patients may be more receptive to those who "practice what they preach."

"Our research shows that the personal weight of health professionals matters when assessing their perceived level of success in helping patients with obesity to lose weight," says study leader Sara Bleich, PhD, an associate professor with the Bloomberg School’s Department of Health Policy and Management.

The research was supported by two grants from the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (1K01HL096409 and K24HL083113) and one from the Health Resources and Services Administration (T32HP10025-17-00). Find out more in the full study here.

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Order your hardcopy of the Obesity Treatment Guidelines
TOS
As part of our work to advance the treatment of obesity, TOS has published the Guidelines (2013) for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults: Full Report as a supplement to its July issue of Obesity. This full report provides the healthcare community with all of the background that went into the abbreviated, summarized version initially released.

In November 2013, TOS joined the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology to release these long-awaited obesity treatment guidelines, which were a condensed executive summary of this larger, comprehensive expert panel report.

This hardcopy edition will serve as a go-to resource for health practitioners around the world. Whether you are a physician, nurse, nutritionist or fitness trainer, every professional interacting with individuals with obesity can find value in this insightful treatment guide. Find out more about ordering your copy here.

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ObesityWeek 2014 Food Industry Forum: 'Calorie Labeling – Who's Paying Attention and Why?'
TOS
One of the hottest topics of debate today is calorie labeling as a strategy to enhance consumer understanding and to encourage industry action to achieve healthier diets. During this session on Monday, Nov. 3 at 1:45pm ET, experts will cover the history of calorie labeling policies, the food industry's experience and consumer response — all critical in reaching desired public health goals.

Speakers include:
  • History of Labeling: Betty Campbell, EAS Consulting Group
  • Food Industry Experience: Deanne Brandstetter, Compass USA
  • Consumer Response: Christina Roberto, Harvard University
This session will be moderated by Sylvia Rowe of SR Strategy. You won't want to miss this event! Be sure to plan to attend as you outline your ObesityWeek 2014 schedule.

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eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner
TOS
To keep the community up to date on the developments in this important area, TOS eHealth/mHealth section offers the eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner. This week's articles include:
    Black A, Sahama T, Gajanayake R. eHealth-as-a-Service (eHaaS): A data-driven decision making approach in Australian context. Studies in health technology and informatics. 2014;205:915-9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25160321

    Scandurra I, Hagglund M, Persson A, Ahlfeldt RM. Disturbing or Facilitating? On the Usability of Swedish eHealth Systems 2013. Studies in health technology and informatics. 2014;205:221-5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25160178

    Monteagudo JL, Salvador CH, Kun L. Envisioning patient safety in Telehealth: a research perspective. Health and Technology. 2014;4:79-93. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25152849
If you have an article you would like to share, we would love to hear from you! Please send article information to Anne Gilmore (anne.gilmore@pbrc.edu), and we'll add it to the EMS Reading Corner Library.

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Calling all obesity educators: the Obesity Medical Education Interest Group is looking for you!
TOS
The new Obesity Medical Education Interest Group (OME Interest Group) will bring educators together to share and discuss interactive curricula for obesity medical education. With the diversity of its membership, we believe TOS's educators can provide a significant pedagogical contribution to medical and allied health universities and postgraduate teaching institutions.

The OME Interest Group will have its inaugural meeting during ObesityWeek on Wednesday, Nov. 5 from 7:00 - 8:00 am at the Westin Hotel to discuss and develop the agenda for the coming year. If you are interested in attending, please contact Deborah Bell at dbell@obesity.org for further information.

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Obesity rates reach historic highs in more US states
Reuters
Rates of adult obesity increased in six U.S. states and fell in none last year, and in more states than ever — 20 — at least 30 percent of adults are obese, according to an analysis released. he conclusions were reported by the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and were based on federal government data. They suggest the problem may be worsening despite widespread publicity about the nation's obesity epidemic, from First Lady Michelle Obama and many others, plus countless programs to address it.
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Apple rolls out the health-enabled Apple Watch
Modern Healthcare
In a much-hyped event, Apple rolled out its new smartwatch that's able to collect health data and share it with providers through the tech giant's HealthKit app, which has drawn interest from major healthcare players such as Mayo Clinic and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
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National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month; Keeping kids healthy and active
Examiner
Childhood obesity is a serious, growing epidemic In the last 30 years childhood obesity rates have tripled and face shorter lifespans than their parents. Estimates have shown 16.9 percent of children and adolescents ages 2 to 9 are obese, and 31.7 percent are overweight. This translates to more than 12 million children and adolescents who are obese, and more than 23 million who are overweight.
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Does confidence = competence in obesity care?
ConscienHealth
A new study in Obesity tells us that allied health professionals with a lower BMI believe they are more successful in helping people with obesity lose weight. This research from Sara Bleich and colleagues at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health complements an earlier study. In that one, they showed that physicians with a lower BMI report more confidence and success in helping people with obesity lose weight.
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Americans are eating way healthier — that is, if they have money
Takepart.com via Yahoo News
Americans get a bad rap for loving processed and fast food and having the obesity rates to show for it. But a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association reveals that overall, people are making healthier choices — unless they come from low-income backgrounds.
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The truth about breakfast and weight loss: Does it really help you drop pounds?
Women's Health
If you want to lose weight, you must eat breakfast; it's almost become a truism at this point, the advice has been repeated so many times. But while previous studies suggested that breakfast leads to a lower BMI, a boost in metabolism, and less hunger throughout the day, a newer batch of research is questioning whether those studies painted an accurate picture of the connection between breakfast and weight loss.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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