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Attending ObesityWeek? Don't forget to cast your absentee ballot!
TOS
The 2014 U.S. General Election is on November 4. If you're attending ObesityWeek, Nov. 2-7, don't forget to find out about your options for absentee and early voting. Per the National Conference of State Legislatures, most states offer a way for eligible voters to cast a ballot before Election Day. Find out more about the voting options in your state here.

Not yet registered? Find out the top five reasons to attend OW2014 here.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


TOS Highlights its ABOM Diplomate Members
TOS
TOS members certified by the American Board of Obesity Medicine are now visibly marked in TOS membership and clinician directories with the ABOM diplomate flag. This prestigious mark of distinction for our members signifies excellence in the practice of obesity medicine. Following the completion of specialized education, physicians who sit for and pass the exam treat patients with a higher level of competency in specialized obesity care.

Interested in taking the ABOM exam? The next exam will be administered Dec. 5–12, 2015 and you can sign up to receive additional information from the ABOM here. TOS also offers a variety of in-person and online trainings to help you prepare. Find out more about these offerings here.

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Action Alert: Ask Congress to commit to medical research
TOS
TOS recently endorsed the Research and Development Efficiency Act (H.R. 5056) — legislation intended to reduce unnecessary red tape that slows and adds needless costs to federally funded research. This bipartisan legislation passed the House unanimously, but the Senate has not yet considered it. The bill would require the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to establish a task force to recommend reforms for modernizing and streamlining the administrative requirements for federally funded research, thus helping researchers optimize the use of awarded funds. Find out more and take action here.
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Deadline Approaching: Just two days before registration closes for mHealth Boot Camp
TOS
Don’t forget to sign up before Thursday (tomorrow) for the TOS eHealth/mHealth Section's mHealth Boot Camp at ObesityWeek 2014. This full-day, pre-conference workshop on Monday, Nov. 3, 8:00am - 5:00pm, offers a primer on mHealth using obesity prevention and treatment examples, and will include public health and clinical perspectives. The workshop will be conducted in a "boot camp" format: each presentation will be followed by participants breaking into small groups to develop a mock mHealth intervention. Sign up when you register for OW2014!
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eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner
TOS
To keep the community up to date on the developments in this important area, TOS eHealth/mHealth section offers the eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner. This week's articles include:
    Appelboom G, Camacho E, Abraham ME, Bruce SS, Dumont EL, Zacharia BE, D’Amico R, Slomian J, Reginster JY, Bryere O, Connolly ES Jr. Smart wearable body sensors for patient self-assessment and monitoring. Archives of Public Health 2014;72(1):28. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25232478

    Shane-McWhorter L, Lenert L, Petersen M, Woolsey S, McAdam-Marx, Coursey JM, Whittaker TC, Hyer C, LaMarche D, Carroll P, Chuy L. The Utah Remote Monitoring Project: Improving Health Care One Patient at a Time. Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics. Epub ahead of print. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24991923

    Van Diest M, Stegenga J, Wortche HJ, Postema K, Verkerke GJ, Lamoth CJ. Suitability of Kinect for measuring whole body movement patterns during exergaming. Journal of Biomechanics. 2014;47(12):2925-32. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25173920
If you have an article you would like to share, we would love to hear from you! Please send article information to Anne Gilmore (anne.gilmore@pbrc.edu), and we'll add it to the EMS Reading Corner Library,

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Introducing the Obesity Hyperguide™
The Obesity Hyperguide™ is a free, interactive learning management system offering a unique, practice-relevant CME learning experience for professionals interested in managing and treating obese patients. Conveniently available 24/7, this web-based platform provides access to engaging educational content exclusively geared to meet your educational needs and improve your clinical practice.
 


American waistlines keep growing
Contributed by HealthCentral
There's now scientific evidence to back up the notion that Americans are developing bigger waistlines. According to a new study, published in JAMA, the average waist circumference in the U.S. grew by an inch between 1999 and 2012.

These findings contradict previous data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which found that no major changes in obesity occurred between 2003 and 2012. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) researchers used the same survey as a source, but determined that the average waist size expanded from 37.6 inches at the beginning of the study to 38.8 inches at the end.

Using seven different two-year cycles of NHANES data, researchers analyzed 32,816 men and non-pregnant women ages 20 and older. Abdominal obesity, defined as a waist circumference larger than 40.2 inches for men and larger than 34.6 inches for women, increased overall from 46.4 percent to 54.2 percent. Men had a 0.8-inch waist circumference increase and 6.4 percent abdominal obesity increase overall. Women had a 1.5-inch waist circumference increase and 9.3 percent abdominal obesity increase overall.

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Coke and Pepsi concede that maybe soda is bad for you
The Washington Post
In an ambitious pledge, the U.S. soda industry is committing to cut America's calorie intake from beverages by 20 percent over the coming decade. As part of the agreement, which was reached by the American Beverage Association and Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Coca-Cola, Pepsi Co. and Dr. Pepper Snapple Group Inc. will promote smaller portions as well as zero and low calorie offerings, and provide calorie counts on vending machines, soda fountains and retail coolers.
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Companies in calorie-cutting pact sell less junk food
Indiana University
When a group of 16 big food companies pledged to cut the overall calories by 1.5 trillion by 2015, scholars were skeptical. But the Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation has already overshot that target, with 6.4 trillion fewer calories sold in 2012 compared to 2007.
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Metabolic effects of the biggest loser
ConscienHealth
Who knew that any evidence base existed for the metabolic effects of The Biggest Loser? A new study just published online in Obesity compares effects of participating in The Biggest Loser to bariatric surgery. In fact, this is the second publication of data from The Biggest Loser collected by researchers from the NIH, Pennington Biomedical Research Center and UCLA.
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Why won't Medicare cover effective obesity drugs?
The Hill
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than one-third of adults in the United States are obese. A 2012 study published by the Journal of Health Economics found that the economic costs of obesity are tremendous, with Americans spending over $190 billion each year on obesity-related medical expenses. These costs go far beyond direct healthcare spending, as obesity contributes to short-term work absences, long-term disability and premature death.
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Environmental nutrition: The pros and cons of fasting
Chicago Tribune
Intermittent fasting is an integral part of our history. Our early ancestors managed without three meals a day, and fasting has long been observed in many cultures and religions, including Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam and Catholicism. Recently, fasting became a new diet trend, but the question remains: are there true health rewards for periodic breaks in eating?
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Could artificial sweeteners be contributing to the obesity epidemic?
Forbes
It's been unclear whether artificial sweeteners actually help the obesity crisis — some evidence has shown that they may do just the opposite. One reason is that already overweight people may be more likely to use artificial sweeteners. Or it could be that artificially sweetened drinks give us the green light to consume more food in general, since we're "saving" so many calories in our drinks. But now, a new study in Nature adds a compelling piece to puzzle: Artificial sweeteners appear to lead to higher blood sugar, in both mice and men.
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Texting your way to a healthier weight?
WeighingInBlog
Diverse populations, including adolescents, people with low income, and those in developing countries, have readily adopted mobile technology and text messaging. As a result, more research has turned to the use of text messaging as a delivery mode for disease prevention or management interventions, especially for these traditionally harder to reach populations. Text messaging has been shown to be a successful tool in smoking cessation and diabetes management, and researchers in the field of obesity prevention have begun to use it with hopes of similar success.
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Is health care improving for obese patients?
U.S. News & World Report via Yahoo News
Nearly 35 percent of U.S. adults are considered obese, each with individual health care needs. But if you're among them, it might feel like you can't get through a single medical encounter without being urged to lose weight — even if you just came in for a flu shot. And you're tired of sitting on a too-narrow exam table in a too-small gown waiting for someone to find a blood pressure cuff that fits. You can ask for safe, accommodating health care that goes beyond your BMI.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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