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Get involved in the future of obesity research & treatment
Letter from the President — TOS eNews
Dear Colleagues,

This month I'm pleased to address three timely topics in my near-final letter as The Obesity Society (TOS) President: 1) an update from the American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM); 2) an introduction to TOS five-year strategic plan, and; 3) an update on the annual event we've all been waiting for — ObesityWeek℠ 2014.

ABOM Update

The American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) is healthy and growing. It is with great pleasure that I share with you the news that the organization has processed just over 425 physician candidates for the 2014 examination. This is an almost 40 percent increase from 2013 (305 candidates) and almost double 2012 (224 candidates)!
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


Weight Watchers Karen Miller-Kovach Research Grant recipient chosen
TOS Scientific Review Committee

Evan Forman, PhD
Congratulations to Evan Forman, PhD, of Drexel University, the recipient of the 2014 Weight Watchers Karen Miller‐Kovach Research Grant. The grant is awarded to one applicant in the amount of $40,000 for a year-long study. Dr. Forman will be recognized for his proposed study, entitled "A Companion Smartphone App to Enhance Dietary Adherence through Predictive Machine Learning" during the TOS Opening Session of ObesityWeek on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 in Boston, MA.

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NIH to fund bariatric surgery research
TOS
The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) — part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) — is launching a new research initiative to study the psychosocial and behavioral variables in individuals undergoing bariatric surgery intended to predict success and risk, and examine mechanisms of behavior change.

The goals of the research are to 1) improve the ability to identify who is at risk for sub-optimal weight loss, weight regain, and short- or long-term adverse metabolic/physiologic or behavioral outcomes based on pre- and/or post-operative behavioral characteristics and 2) inform the development of new treatment approaches to be used pre- and/or post-surgery to minimize risks and improve outcomes or allow for more tailored patient and procedure selection.

More information about the research grant, including application deadlines, is available here.

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Egg Nutrition Center (ENC) hosts breakfast event to award research grant to TOS member
TOS
In its second year, ENC is proud to support a one-year research grant award for a TOS member. This past August, ENC awarded its first TOS research grant to Nick Bellissimo, PhD, Assistant Professor and Director, Food Intake Regulation & Satiety Testing Lab, at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada, for his proposal, Role of Dietary Protein in a Familiar Breakfast Meal on Subjective Satiety, Food Intake and Thermic Effect of Food in Normal Weight and Overweight/Obese Children. As it plans to announce the 2014 recipient, ENC invites all ObesityWeek attendees to join them in honoring the 2014 esteemed recipient at a breakfast event and networking opportunity on Tuesday, Nov. 4 from 6:30 - 8:00am. Space is limited. For more information or to RSVP, please contact Apeksha Gulvady at apeksha.gulvady@edelman.com.

Did you know the Egg Nutrition Center (ENC) administers an annual nutrition research grant program?
For more than 15 years, ENC has supported nutrition research at some of the top academic institutions in the United States. As a commodity check-off program funded by America’s egg farmers through the USDA and the American Egg Board, ENC administers more than $2 million annually in research grants and student fellowships to extend the understanding of nutrition for optimal health. On-going projects include human intervention trials evaluating consumption of eggs or related nutrients (e.g., protein, vitamin D, lutein, vitamin B12) on outcomes related to cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity and dementia, as well as fundamental research using cellular and animal models to better understand the mechanistic underpinnings of these conditions. In 2014, 53 pre-proposals were received from more than 30 different institutions across the U.S., of which 15% have been awarded funding. Find out more and sign up to stay up-to-date here.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Visit the Obesity Hyperguide™ Booth #1034
Are you attending TOS’s 2014 Annual Scientific Meeting? Join us at the Obesity Hyperguide™ booth to explore how you can earn free CME credit and improve your clinical practice with this unique online learning platform. Informational materials detailing registration, activity options, and customizable features will be available onsite.
 


Which commercial weight loss programs and medications are the most cost-effective?
Contributed by Adam Tsai, MD, MS
In recent research published in the journal Obesity, researchers Finkelstein and Kruger examined the cost-effectiveness of different commercial weight loss programs and pharmaceutical agents available in the United States. Diet and exercise programs were categorized as lifestyle (Weight Watchers, Vtrim) or as meal replacements (Jenny Craig). Three pharmaceutical agents were evaluated — Qsymia, Lorcaserin, and Orlistat — of which one (Orlistat) is available over the counter.

Cost-effectiveness was estimated as cost per kg of weight lost, and also as cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Cost per QALY is considered a better measure of cost-effectiveness since it can be compared across all types of health care interventions. The authors found that the two interventions with the best ratio of cost per QALY were Weight Watchers at $34,630 and Qsymia at $54,130.

The results of the study show that an intervention that produces modest weight loss (Weight Watchers) can still be cost-effective, if offered at a relatively low cost, while an intervention that is expensive (Qsymia, at approximately $200 per month) can also be cost-effective because it produces a larger weight loss. These types of analyses can be used by health care payers in deciding which interventions to reimburse, although the U.S. is behind other countries (for example, the UK) in using estimate of cost-effectiveness to make decisions about reimbursement.

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Get to know a TOS Fellow! Q&A with David B. Allison, PhD
TOS

David B. Allison, PhD
It's time for another edition of the Q&A interviews with TOS Fellows! This is the perfect opportunity to get to know leaders in the obesity field a little better, and learn more about their personal lives outside of work. Here are some questions and answers from our interview with TOS Fellow David B Allison, PhD, Distinguished Professor, Quetelet Endowed Professor of Public Health, Associate Dean for Science of the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham:

Q: Please tell us about your current work and your professional developmental trajectory.
A: I am a Distinguished Professor, Quetelet Endowed Professor of Public Health, Associate Dean for Science of the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. I am also the Director of the Office of Energetics at the Nutrition Obesity Research Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. I received my BA in psychology at Vassar College, and obtained my MA in clinical psychology and PhD in clinical psychology at Hofstra University. I also received my post-doctorate in behavioral pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Q: What advice do you have for today's junior obesity researchers?
A: Pick topics that really matter. Work on things that turn you on and will contribute to real advances in our knowledge or understanding. Stay away from repetitive "me too" research. Have fun.

Q: What are your favorite things to do when you're not at work?
A: I enjoy the outdoors and going hiking, biking, fishing, and canoeing with my family, postdocs, students, and dog. We hope you come visit us in Alabama.

Read the rest of the interview with Dr. Allison here. These interviews will be featured bi-monthly in the TOS eNews. Don't miss the next one on October 15!

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  AirPal Bariatric Lateral Transfer Kit
AirPal, the original inventor of air-assisted lateral transfer technology for safe patient handling, will introduce a prepackaged disposable Bariatric Lateral Transfer Kit (BLT KIT™) at ObesityWeek. The economical kits are specifically tailored to organizations that occasionally encounter bariatric transfer situations, such as EMS, post-acute care, and home care agencies. READ MORE

See us at Obesity Week 2014 - Booth 1028
 


ObesityWeek 2014 Obesity & Cancer debate: Energy balance vs. dietary quality
TOS Obesity & Cancer Section
TOS O&C Section announces a new, headlining expert debate/discussion to be held during the Section meeting at ObesityWeek entitled, "Energy Balance versus Dietary Quality for Cancer Prevention: As long as I stay lean, does it matter what I eat?"

This event sponsored by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) will feature two leaders in the field of diet, energy balance and cancer prevention:
  • Jill Reedy, PhD, MPH, RD, Nutritionist with the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch in the Applied Research Program at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)
  • Stephen D. Hursting, PhD, Professor of Nutrition at UNC-Chapel Hill and a leading expert on the role of energy balance in cancer prevention
The discussion will focus on the importance of dietary quality, meal patterns and energy balance for cancer prevention, which continue to be of broad relevance for the field. An interactive Q&A will provide ample opportunity for attendees to engage the speakers. A wine and cheese networking reception will follow.

Save the date and plan to attend the event and reception in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center on Wednesday, Nov. 5 from 7:00 – 9:00pm, as this promises to be a true highlight of ObesityWeek 2014. All are welcome.

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Obesity research takes high-tech twist at Florida school
Reuters
Freshmen at Florida's Lakewood High School lined up against gold and black gymnasium mats to have their height and weight measured, an assessment to launch a novel study on fighting teenage obesity with trendy new technology. Researchers affiliated with Johns Hopkins Medicine, whose network includes a Florida children's hospital near the school, plan to use results of the screening to select about 50 overweight students and track their activity levels using the Fitbit, a connected wristband.
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Antibiotics before age 2 increase risk of childhood obesity
Time
Antibiotics, the most commonly prescribed medications in the first two years of life, might come with the unintended consequence of childhood obesity. By age 2, an astonishing 1 in 10 kids are obese, weighing about 36 pounds. Childhood obesity isn't a problem with a single cause, but according to a new study published in JAMA Pediatrics, some of it could start at the doctor's office.
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New obesity drug won't end need to eat less
The Courier-Journal
New drugs continue to be introduced for people who need help shedding pounds, but there's still no magic pill to avoid cutting calories and working up a sweat. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Contrave extended release tablets Sept. 10, and the drug is expected to be available later this fall at an undisclosed price.
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Dependable champions of the Obesity Action Coalition
ConscienHealth
Some of the top, most dependable champions of the Obesity Action Coalition received richly deserved recognition on the closing evening of the OAC's YWM2014 national convention Saturday night. They deserve our congratulations and appreciation for the leadership and service they provide for people affected by obesity.
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Health agency urges TV-free days to fight obesity
Health Central
If you're serious about getting your weight under control, try to limit your TV viewing to two hours a day or less. That's one of the latest recommendations from England's National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.
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Study: Obese teen boys may make less once they enter workforce
HealthDay News
The incomes of adult men who were obese as teens may be nearly one-fifth lower than those who weren't obese during adolescence, a new study contends. Swedish researchers analyzed data from the United States, the United Kingdom and Sweden and found that young men who were obese as teens earned up to 18 percent less a year than those who were of normal weight during their teen years.
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For obese, stress may be even more deadly
HealthDay News via CBS News
Recurring emotional stress may trigger a stronger biochemical response in overweight people, possibly increasing their risk of chronic illnesses such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers found that overweight people repeatedly placed in a stressful situation exhibited increasing amounts of interleukin-6, a protein that promotes inflammation in the body, in their saliva. Normal weight people did not exhibit this escalation in interleukin-6 levels when exposed to repeated stress.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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