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Why vote for future leaders of The Obesity Society?
Letter from the Executive Director
Dear Colleagues,

As professionals in the obesity research, treatment, and prevention community, and members of The Obesity Society (TOS), we all have an opportunity — and a responsibility — to vote for those who represent us in the Society's Council. Each fall, we rely on you, our members, to select the best and brightest to fill open positions and support the future of the Society.

TOS Council consists of an Executive Committee, made up of five primary officers, who are joined by 10 Councilors representing various areas of the field. This group of 15 TOS leaders seeks to bring together every facet of the obesity research and treatment landscape, from basic scientists to nutritionists to bariatric nurses, physicians and surgeons. The diverse representation on our Council allows us to call on experts across the obesity field, and better serve our members and the millions of people affected by obesity. Together, these Council members develop our organization’s strategy and goals and help us reach new milestones.

I thank you in advance for preparing to cast your vote. The ballot is open now and will close this coming Friday, Oct. 9. All TOS members should have received the ballot via email. For your convenience, it is also available on the Members Only page in the Member Center where you will need to log in to access the online ballot.

If you're not yet a member, we invite you to join us as we move into the future, leading new efforts to improve the research, treatment and prevention of obesity.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


Now open — 2015 TOS elections and bylaws vote
TOS
Current Fellows and regular members of TOS are now able to cast their ballot. The election, which opened on Wednesday, Sept. 30, will close on Friday, Oct. 9. You can log in to the Member's Only Page to access the voting link. Please note you can only submit the e-ballot one time.

We have an outstanding group of candidates for you to consider for the following positions on Council: Vice President, WOF Regional Councilor, Basic/Experimental/Pre-clinical Councilor, Advocacy/Public Affairs/Regulatory Councilor, Population/Epidemiology/Community Councilor, Councilor At-Large and Councilor At-Large: Representative to Canada. There are also three candidates for the Nominating Committee. Members will have the opportunity to review the candidates' statements/bios prior to casting their votes through the survey.

Having trouble voting? In order to vote for the Society's new leaders, you will need to ensure your membership status is up to date. To verify your membership status and retrieve login information, access TOS Member Center here.

Please contact Trimmer Green, Governance and Executive Assistant at governance@obesity.org or 240-485-1955, if you have questions regarding the election process.

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Can added sugar labeling information help consumers? Researchers say 'yes'
TOS
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently announced a supplemental rulemaking regarding adding the percent daily value for added sugars to the Nutrition Facts label of packaged foods. Public comments are due Oct. 13, 2015.

To help understand how this new law could impact consumers, the Obesity journal recently published a study, The Efficacy of Sugar Labeling Formats: Implications for Labeling Policy, by Lana Vanderlee, et al. The corresponding commentary, Added Sugar in the Nutrition Facts Label: Consumer Needs and Scientific Uncertainty, by Theodore K. Kyle, RPh, MBA, and Diana M. Thomas, PhD, claims the research findings suggest the proposed label "will have positive effects on consumer awareness and understanding of added sugar in packaged food products."

In previously submitted comments to the FDA on the issue, The Obesity Society said, "We hope this [new label] will not only help individuals become aware of the amount of added sugar they are ingesting, but also motivate manufacturers to start lowering the amount of added sugars in products."

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The circadian dominance in morning-to-evening difference in diet-induced thermogenesis
Contributed by Rod Velliquette, PhD
Circadian differences in nutrient metabolism and diet induced thermogenesis (DIT) have been repeatedly reported, and might be related to the increase obesity risk in night shift workers. However, the contribution of our endogenous circadian clock compared to behavioral cycles in this difference in DIT is not clear. In a recent study in the October issue of Obesity, Christopher Morris, PhD, et al., explored this relationship in humans with a short-term acute misalignment protocol that was designed to simulate night shift.

Evening DIT and postprandial energy expenditure was lower than in the morning, independent of behavioral cycles. However, short-term acute circadian misalignment had no effect on DIT. This work adds to the growing knowledge of the importance of our endogenous circadian clock in postprandial metabolism, and suggests that perhaps a more chronic circadian misalignment is involved in the increase obesity risk among night shift workers. Read the full article here.

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Interested in obesity and cancer? Attend the Section meeting and reception at ObesityWeek℠ 2015
Contributed by TOS Obesity and Cancer Section
If you are interested in any aspect of the link between obesity and cancer, you won't want to miss the opportunity to attend the Obesity & Cancer (O&C) Section meeting at ObesityWeek this year on Thursday, Nov. 5 from 7:30 – 9:30 pm. Highlights will include an exciting debate and the annual abstract/poster competition award ceremony. An interactive Q&A will provide ample opportunity for attendees to engage the speakers. Following the meeting, all attendees are invited to attend the wine and cheese reception generously sponsored by the California Walnut Commission for an opportunity to interact and network with colleagues in a relaxed atmosphere, as well as view posters presented by abstract competition awardees.

Debate from 7:30pm – 8:15pm
Reception follows from 8:15pm – 9:00pm

Don't forget to add this event to your calendar!

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Reminder: Don't miss the NYAS event on obesity and nutrition policy
Contributed by the New York Academy of Sciences
Nutrition policy decisions should consider scientific evidence and aim to improve health outcomes on a large scale. The New York Academy of Science (NYAS) will host a one-day conference on obesity and nutrition policy on Friday, Oct. 16, from 8:30 am – 5:00 pm in New York City. The conference, titled Towards Evidence-based Nutrition and Obesity Policy: Methods, Implementation, and Political Reality, will focus on emerging research methodology, how to interpret research outcomes and how these can be used to inform policy.

Speakers will cover the following topics:
  • The Reality of Using Evidence to Inform Nutrition and Obesity Policy
  • Connecting the Dots: Translating Systems Thinking into Public Health Innovations
  • Using Quasi-Experimental Methods and Big Data to Build Evidence in Obesity Policy
  • A Mathematical Modelling Approach to Inform Nutrition and Obesity Policies
  • From Policy Research Evidence to Policy Unfolding
  • Sugar Sweetened Beverages in Mexico: Designing a Tax and Evaluating Impact
  • Using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to Influence Dietary Change
  • Labeling Calories of "Restaurant-Type" Food: NYC to the FDA
Registration for this full-day event is $20 for students, $30 for NYAS members and $65 for non-profit organizations. Find out more and register here.

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eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner
Contributed by TOS eHealth/mHealth Section
To keep the community up to date on the developments in this important area, TOS eHealth/mHealth section offers the eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner. This week's articles include:
Bertz F, Pacanowski CR, Levitsky DA. Frequent Self-Weighing with Electronic Graphic Feedback to Prevent Age-Related Weight Gain in Young Adults. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015 Oct;23(10):2009-14.

Gill S, Panda S. A Smartphone App Reveals Erratic Diurnal Eating Patterns in Humans that Can Be Modulated for Health Benefits. Cell Metab. 2015 Sep 22. [Epub ahead of print]

Yuan S, Ma W, Kanthawala S, et al. Keep Using My Health Apps: Discover Users' Perception of Health and Fitness Apps with the UTAUT2 Model. Telemed J E Health. 2015 Sep;21(9):735-41. doi: 10.1089/tmj.2014.0148.
If you have an article you would like to share, we would love to hear from you! Please send article information to Danielle Schoffman (schoffmd@email.sc.edu), and we'll add it to the EMS Reading Corner Library.

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Not mom's weight loss: For millennials, more than diet and exercise at play
CNN
It's a never-ending battle: You diet and exercise, but can't shed the pounds. You can at least take comfort in a new study that suggests many other factors, including stress and pollution, could be conspiring to make weight loss harder today than a few decades ago. Researchers looked over the years at what adults in the United States said they ate, how much they reported exercising and their body mass index.
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Mixed messages on sugary drinks may cause consumer confusion
Healio
Children and adults are consuming more sugar-sweetened beverages than ever, while the portion sizes of many sugary drinks have grown. According to the National Cancer Institute, 50 percent of people in the United States consume sodas, sports drinks and fruit drinks on any given day, with 1 in 4 getting at least 200 calories from sugar-sweetened beverages.
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Join ASMBS Foundation's United We Step Challenge
ASMBS
Physicians with an interest in obesity medicine are invited to participate in the ASMBS Foundation's United We Step National Pedometer Challenge. This one-day event is intended to increase public awareness of obesity and encourage individuals to expand their daily physical activities.
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More questions than answers about the obesity paradox
ConscienHealth
A new study published this week in Obesity raises more questions than it answers about the obesity paradox. This paradox had been seen in many studies: People with cardiovascular disease who have excess weight sometimes live longer than people with weight in the normal BMI range. In this new study, Andrew Stokes and Samuel Preston have found support for the possibility that the obesity paradox may be a reflection of reverse causation and a history of smoking in people with lower weights.
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Can we do anything to slow the obesity epidemic?
Pioneer News
An alarming new study says that this generation will have a harder time losing weight than any generation before it. The study compares data from today with stats from the 1980s to determine that even if we ate and exercised exactly the same as a person who lived in, say 1985, modern folk will have a higher BMI.
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Cheap options for a healthy diet
HealthCentral
How much does it really cost to eat nutritious? Researchers out of Harvard School of Public Health analyzed 27 existing studies from 10 high-income nations. Their analysis included the differences in prices per serving and per 200 calories for specific types of foods, as well as prices per day and per 2,000 calories.
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Science-backed advice on how to stop sitting all day
The Huffington Post
The last few years have seen a lot of research on how bad sitting all day can be. The risks of a sedentary lifestyle include poor cardiovascular health, cancer, diabetes and obesity. While the physical health implications are profound, it's not just the body that suffers. Researchers are uncovering how extended periods of sitting can also affect our mental health.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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