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Congratulations to the 2014 Ethan Sims Young Investigator Award finalists
Letter from the Executive Director
Dear Colleagues,

I'm pleased to announce that the 2014 Ethan Sims Young Investigator Award finalists have been selected! Mark your calendars and plan to watch these young, promising investigators present their award-winning abstracts at ObesityWeek℠ 2014 on Thursday, Nov. 6 from 8:00am - 10:15am BCEC - Room 258ABC.

The Ethan Sims Young Investigator Award recognizes excellence in young investigators' research based on their submitted abstracts and presentations during ObesityWeek. Five finalists are selected during the call for abstracts, and they are given up to $1,000 to cover the expenses of the annual meeting. The award is presented during a plenary session at ObesityWeek, where the five finalists are invited to present their oral abstracts. The recipient will be chosen at the conclusion of the session and will receive an additional $1,000 cash prize.

Congratulations to this year's finalists:
  • Ruth Brown, MSc, PhD Candidate, York University
  • Elizabeth Frost, PhD Candidate, Pennington Biomedical Research Center
  • Ceren Ozek, PhD Candidate, University of Pennsylvania
  • Hayley Syrad, PhD Candidate, University College London
  • Kristin Young, MD, University of North Carolina
I hope you will join us at the event to support our finalists.

Sincerely,

Francesca Dea
TOS Executive Director
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


TOS honors leaders in the field with awards and grants at ObesityWeek
TOS
ObesityWeek 2014 is not only a time to network with peers and learn about the latest science in obesity research and treatment, but it's also a time to honor The Obesity Society's award and grant recipients. TOS commends the following individuals, who will receive their awards and grants at ObesityWeek:

Awards Grants
  • 2014 Early-Career Research Grant — Courtney Peterson, PhD, Pennington Biomedical Research Center
  • 2014 Early-Career Research Grant — Christina Roberto, PhD, Harvard School of Public Health
  • 2014 Weight Watchers Karen Miller-Kovach Research Grant — Evan Forman, PhD, Drexel University
  • 2014 Egg Nutrition Center Research Grant — Dexi Liu, PhD, University of Georgia
Awards and grants will be presented at ObesityWeek℠ in Boston, MA, Nov. 2-7, 2014. For details about presentation times, be sure to review the ObesityWeek interactive schedule. Congratulations to all recipients on this well-deserved honor!

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Don't miss the 2nd Annual Obesity Symposium at ObesityWeek 2014!
TOS
The editors of the journal Obesity have selected six leading research papers to be featured in the 2nd annual Obesity Journal Symposium on Wednesday, Nov. 5 from 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET. This special session will highlight the following papers, which will be published in a special section of the November 2014 issue of Obesity:
  • Comparative Effectiveness of Three Doses of Weight-Loss Counseling: Two-Year Findings from the Rural LITE Trial, Michael G. Perri, PhD, University of Florida
  • Kidney Function in Severely Obese Adolescents Undergoing Bariatric Surgery, Thomas Inge, MD, PhD, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
  • Objective Physical Activity and Weight Loss in Adults: The Step-Up Randomized Clinical Trial, John Jakicic, PhD, University of Pittsburgh
  • Cognitive Performance and BMI in Childhood: Shared Genetic Influences Between Reaction Time, but not Response Inhibition, Alexis Frazier-Wood, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine
  • The Role of Small Heterodimer Partner in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Improvement After Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy in Mice, Andriy Myronovych, MD, PhD, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
  • Preventing Weight Gain with Calorie-Labeling, Charoula Konstantia Nikolaou,PhD, University of Glasgow
Congratulations to the authors for their groundbreaking work! Don't forget to add this session to your itinerary as you plan your schedule.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Introducing the Obesity Hyperguide™
The Obesity Hyperguide™ is a free, interactive learning management system offering a unique, practice-relevant CME learning experience for professionals interested in managing and treating obese patients. Conveniently available 24/7, this web-based platform provides access to engaging educational content exclusively geared to meet your educational needs and improve your clinical practice.
 


Get to know a TOS Fellow! Q&A with Harold Bays MD, FACE, FNLA
TOS

Dr. Harold Bays
It's time for another edition of the Q&A interviews with TOS Fellows! This is the perfect opportunity to get to know leaders in the obesity field a little better, and learn more about their personal lives outside of work. Here are some questions and answers from our interview with TOS Fellow Harold Bays MD, FACE, FNLA, Medical Director and President of Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center:

Q: Please tell us about your current work and your professional developmental trajectory.
A: I am Board Certified in Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, and am a Diplomat of the American Board of Clinical Lipidology as well as American Board of Obesity Medicine. I have served as an Investigator for more than 400 Phase I — IV clinical trials regarding treatments for dyslipidemias, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and other metabolic and hormonal disorders. As Medical Director and President of Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center, I have written, or served as a contributing author to, more than 200 published scientific manuscripts and book chapters, as well as more than 100 scientific abstracts presented at major scientific meetings.

Q: What aspects of obesity research are the most exciting to you right now?
A: The research data and world continues to gravitate towards the position that adipocytes and adipose tissue are no longer considered inert storage cells and organ. Rather, it is the pathos of adipocytes and adipose tissue (adiposopathy) that is both a direct, and indirect contributor to the most common metabolic diseases encountered in clinical practice (type 2 diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, dyslipidemia).

Q: What are your favorite things to do when you're not at work?
A: Nowadays, I am never "not at work" — a potential lesson for early research Investigators. However, I do maintain a regular physical exercise program, and in the past: 1973-1974: Busboy, Dishwasher 1974-1976: Cook 1976-1978: Janitor 1978-1980: Clerk/Cashier 1980-1990: Musician 1989-1999: National Touring Professional Stand-Up Comedian

Read the rest of the interview with Dr. Bays here. These interviews will be featured bi-monthly in the TOS eNews. Don't miss the next one on October 29!

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Check out the new ABOM Heat Maps to see how many Diplomates are in your state!
TOS
Have you ever wondered where the most obesity professionals are located in the US, particularly those who are ABOM Diplomates? If so, check out the new heat maps from ABOM which show the number of Diplomates per state and the Diplomates per capita in each state:


Diplomates by State

Diplomates per capita


These maps are available on the ABOM webpage here.

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ASMBS Foundation invites you to participate in the OW2014 Exhibit Expedition
TOS
Join the ASMBS Foundation at ObesityWeek 2014 for a chance to win great prizes, and raise funds toward obesity research, education and treatment! Network with industry, challenge colleagues and enter to win a 4 night stay in Hawaii, plus $500 towards airfare!

How to Play: For a tax-deductible donation of only $20, you will receive an Exhibit Expedition Passport. The first passport stamp will be given at the ASMBS Foundation booth, granting one entry into the drawing. You can get more entries into the drawing by visiting up to nine of the participating exhibitors and asking for a stamp. We encourage you to learn more about the participating exhibitor’s company, products and services while claiming stamps.

Passports are limited! Register today to secure your Exhibit Expedition Passport!

Participation is not required to be entered into the drawing. You may simply donate to this event and still be eligible for the drawing. For every $20 donated, you will receive one entry into the drawing. There is no limit on the amount you may donate or the number of entries you may receive.

All donations are tax-deductible and all proceeds go directly to the ASMBS Foundation. Find out more here.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  AirPal Bariatric Lateral Transfer Kit
AirPal, the original inventor of air-assisted lateral transfer technology for safe patient handling, will introduce a prepackaged disposable Bariatric Lateral Transfer Kit (BLT KIT™) at ObesityWeek. The economical kits are specifically tailored to organizations that occasionally encounter bariatric transfer situations, such as EMS, post-acute care, and home care agencies. READ MORE

See us at Obesity Week 2014 - Booth 1028
 


OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Champions of The Obesity Society
ConscienHealth
On Nov. 5 at ObesityWeek in Boston — the premier annual scientific and educational conference for obesity professionals — The Obesity Society will be awarding special recognition to five individuals for distinguished work to advance the understanding of obesity and strategies to reduce its impact on human health. We salute these champions of The Obesity Society.
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Obese kids face greater risk for heart disease
MedPage Today
The adverse long-term influence of obesity and elevated blood pressure on left ventricular remodeling begins in childhood, according to findings from the world's longest running biracial heart study. Among participants in the Bogalusa Heart Study, higher body mass index and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in childhood and adulthood, as well as total area under the curve and incremental AUC, were all significantly associated with higher left ventricular mass and left ventricular hypertrophy, reported Gerald S. Berenson, MD, of Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans, and colleagues.
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Study: Obesity may speed aging of the liver
Drugs.com
Extra pounds cause the liver to age faster, potentially explaining why obesity is linked to diseases like liver cancer and insulin resistance, new research suggests. It's not clear if this aging directly translates to higher risks of certain diseases. Still, it's possible that "people whose liver is much older than expected need to be screened more carefully for various diseases even if they managed to lose a lot of weight," said study author Steve Horvath, a professor of human genetics and biostatistics at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Public Health.
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Study: Today's parents less able to spot obesity in their kids
HealthDay News
Parents have become less able to realize when their child is overweight or obese, a new study finds. In fact, parents interviewed between 2005 and 2010 were 24 percent less likely to spot a weight problem in their child than parents interviewed between 1988 and 1994, the researchers said.
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The importance of screen time for children: 'Prime time' to prevent childhood obesity?
WeighingInBlog
Children in the United States consume an average of 7 hours a day of screen media. Television is the biggest culprit, but time spent on cellular phones, in front of the computer, on a tablet, or playing video games contribute a good bit of that time too.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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