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ObesityWeek scientific session kicks off — Attendance reaches 5300!
TOS
The scientific sessions kicked off in full force this week with both ASMBS and TOS sessions continuing through Thursday for ASMBS, and through Friday for TOS. With 5300 attendees, over 100 symposia, 1500 abstract presentations and several special social events to choose from, attendees can build a schedule that fits their educational interests. Attendees continue to explore a variety of sessions including integrated health, neuroscience, population health, and much more of the latest in obesity surgery and research.

The Welcome Reception at the Boston Museum of Science on Monday evening brought together attendees to network, meet new friends, and explore some of the most unique scientific displays in North America. The Reception was one of the first of several events that bring TOS and ASMBS together during this historic conference.

TOS is posting photos regularly to social media. Check out the latest photo album on Facebook.
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


ObesityWeek keynote with Dr. C. Ronald Kahn
TOS
In the ObesityWeek opening keynote yesterday, Dr. C. Ronald Kahn presented a new role for fat: as an accumulator of the body’s responses to environmental stress and a major player in our ability to ward off stress- and age-related disease and increase life span. Fat is regulated not only by food intake and energy expenditure, but also by developmental genes and microRNAs differentially expressed in the various adipose tissue depots. Dr. Kahn described how several genes program fundamental aspects of adipocytes. For example, differences in gene expression are what make intra-abdominal visceral fat associated with insulin resistance while subcutaneous fat is associated with insulin sensitivity. In addition, the levels of different microRNAs determine the function of brown vs. white fat.

The levels of microRNAs in fat progressively decline as we age, and Dr. Kahn explained that this decline is related to a drop in dicer, a key enzyme related to the production of mature microRNAs. Research in Dr. Kahn's lab has shown that stressors such as toxins, UV light, or oxidative stress reduce levels of dicer while caloric restriction increases them. Eliminating dicer in mice leads to the "whitening" of brown fat. Taken together, this evidence suggests that microRNAs can program the nature of our fat and the body's ability to handle environmental stress. Dr. Kahn concluded that we may one day be able to manipulate our genes in order to optimize the functions of our adipose tissue, including lipid storage, fat cell size, and lipolytic rate.

If you're with us in Boston, we hope you caught today's keynote presentation from Jim Marks, MD, MPH, Senior Vice President at Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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Strategies to address added sugar consumption
TOS
As the United States Food and Drug Administration considers a new food label detailing the amount of added sugars in foods, new research confirms that this non-nutritive calorie source has crept into the American diet over the past three decades. The study details an increase in added sugars consumed by American adults by more than 30% (228 calories per day in 1977 compared to 283 calories in 2009-2010). During that same time period, calories from added sugars consumed by children increased by approximately 20% (277 to 329 calories per day). TOS's Pediatric Obesity Section has recognized this research with a Poster of Excellence Award.

In addition to efforts by the FDA to include added sugars on nutrition labels, other innovative solutions include limiting the amount of added sugar allowed in the food supply, using a cap-and-trade policy, similar to those used for environmental pollutants. Researchers Kristina Lewis, MD, MPH, of the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research and Sanjay Basu, MD, PhD, of Stanford University also unveiled a study this week that evaluates how cap and trade might impact caloric consumption and obesity rates, compared to other measures such as taxes on sugar or sugar-sweetened beverages. This study was presented at ObesityWeek on Tuesday.

Additional information about both studies is available here.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Introducing the Obesity Hyperguide™
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Obesity treatment recommended for 65% of Americans
TOS
New research released on Monday at ObesityWeek shows that 140 million American adults — about 65 percent — are recommended for behavioral weight loss treatment, with 83% of those (or 116 million) considered for pharmacotherapy. Thirty-two million adults recommended for both pharmacotherapy and behavioral treatment are also potential candidates for bariatric surgery.

To conduct the study, researchers used data from the 2007 – 2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to estimate the proportion of adults in the US recommended for treatment based on the Guidelines (2013) for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults released by TOS, the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology last year.

This study will be presented during a poster session in the ObesityWeek Exhibit Hall at noon on Thursday, November 6 in Boston, Mass. More information is available here.

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Thinking about the long-term impact of your food choices may help control food cravings
TOS
New research reinforces the idea that the brain can control eating behavior, and considering the long-term consequences of your food choices may help control food cravings. Two research studies showing the way you think about food can have an impact on appetite, and many others on the relationship between the brain and eating behavior, will be unveiled this week at The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2014 in Boston.

Kathryn Demos, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Miriam Hospital at Brown University and her colleagues used functional MRI scans to watch participants brains as they reviewed pictures of enticing foods, like pizza, French fries and ice cream. Through the scans researchers were able to evaluate different strategies to reduce the desire to eat. They found that thinking about the long-term negative impact of eating these foods may be an effective way to reduce appetite.

A second study presented this week adds evidence to the current thinking that individuals with obesity can successfully reduce cravings using distraction tasks. For this study, Richard Weil, M.Ed. CDE, of Director of the Weight Loss Program at Mt Sinai St. Luke's Hospital in New York City, and his colleagues tested the effects of three, 30-second distraction techniques to reduce cravings for the study participant's favorite foods. They found that the effect of tapping one's own forehead and ear with their index finger, tapping one's toe on the floor, or a control task of staring at a blank wall, all worked significantly to reduce the cravings; however, forehead tapping worked best out of all techniques. Find out more here.

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TOS ObesityWeek sessions available for purchase
TOS
Not able to attend TOS sessions at ObesityWeek this year? TOS is making key content from ObesityWeek 2014 available in an online program with ObesityWeek On Demand. Watch sessions anytime, anywhere with convenient online access and a USB drive when online viewing is not available.

ObesityWeek On Demand uses superior technology to deliver a highly efficient program for the busiest of healthcare professionals. With features like Advanced Search, Bookmarks and Recently Viewed, you can spend less time searching for content and more time learning. In addition, earn CME credits!

Special discounts are available here or call 800-501-2303.

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Interested in a subspecialty in obesity medicine?
TOS
An obesity medicine physician is trained and certified to employ therapeutic interventions, including diet, physical activity, behavioral change and pharmacotherapy. The deadline just passed to sign up to take this year's exam, but there's good news: the next exam takes place Dec. 5 - 12, 2014, and there is plenty of time to study!

TOS Review Course for the American Board of Obesity Medicine Exam held during ObesityWeek 2014 can help. Just ask one of the more than 140 physicians who attended TOS's Review Course for the ABOM Exam this year. This year's course was taught by some of the industry's top educators, and included a new workbook — an important tool both in class for taking notes, and later to study for the upcoming exam.

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100+ Participants Join the Obesity Action Coalition for YWMLocal— Boston 2014 at ObesityWeek 2014
Obesity Action Coalition
This past Sunday, the Obesity Action Coalition (OAC) hosted its first regional event, YWMLocal — Boston, and invited individuals from the Greater Boston area to join in a FREE half-day patient educational event. YWMLocal — Boston 2014 was modeled after the highly successful OAC National Convention and aims to bring the powerful Your Weight Matters message into the local community.

Despite the snow, Sunday's event welcomed more than 100 individuals eager to learn about how weight impacts health, along with a variety of related topics in the areas of nutrition, exercise, evidence-based treatment options, and much more! The OAC is tremendously grateful for the support of the YWMLocal — Boston 2014 Sponsors, whose generous support made this successful event possible. Special thanks to our Event Sponsors: Novo Nordisk (Gold), Eisai (Silver), Arena Pharmaceuticals (Bronze).

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Americans' view on obesity is changing: Fewer adults see it as a personal problem of bad choices
TOS
New research evaluating the opinions of both the American public and healthcare professionals during the past year finds a shift in perception toward obesity as a community problem of risks related to food and inactivity. For adults in the United States, perception has moved away from seeing obesity as a personal problem resulting from bad choices. Healthcare professionals were already less likely than the public to view obesity as a personal problem of bad choices. These findings will be presented during a poster session on Wednesday, Nov. 5 at The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2014 in Boston.
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1st long-term study on calorie labeling shows strategy effective in reducing weight gain by 50 percent
TOS
The first long-term study on the impact of calorie labeling on body weight shows that when used in universities, calorie labeling can reduce weight gain in students by nearly eight pounds (3.5 kg). Recent guidance from the United States' Affordable Care Act and the United Kingdom's Responsibility Deal encourage calorie labeling in chain restaurants, yet there have been mixed results as to the effects of calorie labeling on consumers' meal choices and weight status. This new research shows that consistent exposure to prominent calorie labeling of main meals reduced the likelihood of young adults gaining any weight over a one-year period by 50 percent. The findings from this U.K.-based study will be presented during the Obesity Journal Symposium at The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2014 in Boston.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  AirPal Bariatric Lateral Transfer Kit
AirPal, the original inventor of air-assisted lateral transfer technology for safe patient handling, will introduce a prepackaged disposable Bariatric Lateral Transfer Kit (BLT KIT™) at ObesityWeek. The economical kits are specifically tailored to organizations that occasionally encounter bariatric transfer situations, such as EMS, post-acute care, and home care agencies. READ MORE

See us at Obesity Week 2014 - Booth 1028
 


Research suggests high-fat diets during pregnancy could influence brain functioning and behavior of children
TOS
New research suggests that a high-fat maternal diet during pregnancy and while breastfeeding could have significant and lasting detrimental effects on the brain function and behavior of children. The study is one of few basic science studies conducted to measure the direct effect of a high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning on offspring. Results from this study, and others related to obesity and pregnancy, will be presented today during an oral presentation by author Kellie Tamashiro, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University at 3:30pm ET at The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeek 2014 in Boston.
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The increase in sugar consumption and associated obesity has been alarming
Examier
There has been compelling evidence that increased consumption of sugar is associated with obesity. The Obesity Society reported that adult consumption of added sugars has shockingly increased by greater than 30 percent over the past three decades in the United States. New research has showed that more and more of the non-nutritive calorie source of added sugar has worked its way into the American diet over the past three decades.
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Demand for obesity drugs creeps upwards
Medical Marketing & Media
With Orexigen and Takeda's weight-loss drug Contrave (naltrexone and bupropion) on the market as of last month, the triumvirate of new prescription obesity medications, which includes Vivus's Qsymia (phentermine and topiramate) and the Arena/Eisai drug Belviq (lorcaserin), would appear set to take on the health problem that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has declared an epidemic.
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Report: 116 million obese Americans recommended for prescription diet aids
Drug Store News
Research shows that 140 million American adults are recommended for behavioral weight-loss treatment, with 83 percent of those considered for pharmacotherapy, according to a report released by The Obesity Society. Thirty-two million adults are recommended for both pharmacotherapy and behavioral treatment, and are also potential candidates for bariatric surgery.
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ObesityWeek: A matter of taste
MedPage Today
It's not the gut, but the tongue that will be the focus of some of the top research at this year's ObesityWeek conference. A hot area of obesity research is in the connection between taste and obesity, according to Alison Field, ScD, of Boston Children's Hospital and a spokesperson for The Obesity Society. The meeting is presented jointly with the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.
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Professors take leadership roles at ObesityWeek 2014
Texas Tech University
The newly formed Department of Nutritional Sciences at Texas Tech University is positioning itself to be among the world's leading programs in obesity and nutritional sciences with substantial contributions to this week's annual scientific sessions of The Obesity Society at ObesityWeek in Boston.
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OAC reaching out at ObesityWeek 2014
ConscienHealth
After setting new records for attendance at the YWM2014 national convention in September, the Obesity Action Coalition scored another first in Boston Sunday. Reaching out at ObesityWeek 2014, OAC presented its first local event to an audience of more than a hundred people affected by obesity in Boston with a faculty of top experts in obesity.
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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