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Happy Thanksgiving from The Obesity Society!

ObesityWeek 2015 Symposium & Speaker Suggestion Site Open!
TOS
As we celebrate our successes from ObesityWeek 2014, we're also getting started on planning for ObesityWeek 2015. As in the past, TOS asks our members – and our network of obesity professionals, partners and sponsors — for ideas on what would make great symposia for our next conference. It is these ideas that TOS Program Committee clips up and pieces together to make something new, and engaging for all attendees to enjoy.

Tell us what you think will make a great symposium at ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 2 – 7. The symposium submission site is open today and will close on Dec 19. There's just about a month for you to submit your ideas, so start working on your suggestions today!

TOS offers our sincere gratitude to all of our submitters, and would love to include all ideas in the conference program. However, we regret that given the high quality and quantity of submissions we are not able to use all of your great ideas. Last year you sent us more than 100 submissions, with only 30 symposia slots to fill!

Further, as you prepare your suggestions, please do not submit duplicates from prior meetings or suggestions from other conferences you've attended. TOS Program Committee works hard to ensure ObesityWeek offers something fresh and new for our attendees. Find out more and submit your suggestions here.
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TOS: FDA Ruling Provides Consumers with Calorie Labeling Information to Make Informed Food Choices
TOS
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration took a step to help consumers make informed food selections with two rules issued yesterday (Nov. 25, 2014) that require calorie information to be listed on menus in chain restaurants. The final rules come after FDA considered more than 1,100 comments submitted to the agency and on the heels of new research illustrating the benefits of calorie labeling for consumers.

“Americans eat and drink about one-third of their calories away from home and people today expect clear information about the products they consume,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, MD in a press release. “Making calorie information available on chain restaurant menus and vending machines is an important step for public health that will help consumers make informed choices for themselves and their families.”

The Obesity Society commended efforts to provide more information to consumers so they are better able to make informed decisions regarding their food choices and their health.

“Making caloric information easily accessible is helpful for people affected by obesity even if they do not lose weight,” says Diana Thomas, PhD, TOS Advocacy Committee Member and Director of the Center for Quantitative Obesity Research and Professor at Montclair State University who studies the impact of calorie counting on obesity. Read more in the press release here .

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ASSOCIATION NEWS


Are you an early career researcher or clinician? Find out what TOS is doing to support you
TOS
Focusing on early career researchers and clinicians in the obesity field is a priority for TOS, as outlined in our five-year strategic plan. In his opening speech at ObesityWeek 2014, TOS President Nikhil Dhurandhar, PhD, discussed the five-year TOS Strategic Plan from which growing the careers of early career professionals emerged as a primary objective for the coming years.

Currently, the Society has a number of efforts to support early career members, including the annual Early Career Research Grants, special sessions at ObesityWeek and a Leadership Development Task Force. In the next five years, TOS leadership hopes to increase involvement with the early career members and provide ample opportunities for them to progress in their careers.

"Nurturing the careers and development of early career researchers and clinicians is an investment in the future of obesity medicine and weight management," said Dr. Dhurandhar.

TOS is already making strides to increase opportunities for early career members, as was seen in the TOS Awards Ceremony at ObesityWeek 2014. During the meeting, TOS Secretary-Treasurer and Atkinson-Stern Award recipient Martin Binks, PhD, FTOS, announced the creation of an all-new, yearly travel grant, Bench to Bedside Early Career Travel Grants, for ObesityWeek open to all early career members. Dr. Binks reallocated his $1,000 Atkinson-Stern award, and added an additional $1,000, to help fund two students for travel to ObesityWeek. He will continue to make the contribution in the coming years. Congratulations to Katelyn Gettens, a graduate student at the University of Connecticut, and Pia Villarroel, a nutritionist at the Universidad de Chile, who were randomly selected for this year's new award.

If you're an early career researcher or clinician you can find out more about TOS's work to support you in this online video. Not yet a member? Find out more about member benefits here.

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Dietary treatment during pregnancy can be effective in helping women reduce calories
Contributed by Issy Esangbedo, MD
During pregnancy, many women experience excessive weight gain which is retained postpartum and this is particularly significant in women entering pregnancy with overweight and obesity. In a study published in the December issue of Obesity by Huseinovic et al, researchers examine changes in intake across food groups in the LEVA (Lifestyle for Effective Weight Loss during Lactation) trial, a randomized controlled trial among lactating Swedish women. In this trial, women with a self-reported pre-pregnancy BMI of 25 to 35 kg/m2 and an intention to breastfeed for 6 months were randomly assigned to 4 study groups; dietary behavior modification group (D), physical exercise behavior modification group (E), dietary and physical exercise behavior modification group (DE) or control group (C) for a 12-week intervention.

Baseline study measurements were obtained at 8 to 12 weeks postpartum then at 12 weeks, after intervention termination and 9 months post-treatment indicated as 1 year after randomization. During the intervention period, lactating women receiving dietary treatment reduced their total energy intake from sweets, salty snacks and caloric drinks while they increased their energy intake from vegetables more than women that did not receive dietary treatment. At 1 year, increased intake from vegetables was maintained among these women receiving dietary treatment resulting in sustained weight loss. Read the full study here.

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  Introducing the Obesity Hyperguide™
The Obesity Hyperguide™ is a free, interactive learning management system offering a unique, practice-relevant CME learning experience for professionals interested in managing and treating obese patients. Conveniently available 24/7, this web-based platform provides access to engaging educational content exclusively geared to meet your educational needs and improve your clinical practice.
 


Energy balance vs. dietary quality for cancer prevention: Does it matter what you eat?
Contributed by Gerald Denis, PhD, Obesity & Cancer Section Chair

Drs. Stephen Hursting & Jill Reedy
At ObesityWeek 2014, Derek Huffman, PhD, of Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, the outgoing chair of TOS Obesity & Cancer Section, convened a star panel of two experts in obesity research, Jill Reedy, PhD, MPH, RD, from National Cancer Institute, and Stephen Hursting, PhD, MPH, from University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. In front of an audience of more than 100, these two fiercely intelligent, combative, yet reasonable investigators addressed the question, "Energy balance versus dietary quality for cancer prevention: As long as I stay lean, does it matter what I eat?"

While the panelists, moderated by June Stevens, PhD, also of UNC Chapel Hill, did not come to an agreement on the topic, there was agreement that we have much to learn from ongoing research in the area. Given the interest and success of the event, the Section plans to hold this fantastic and informative event again at ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles. The Section also asks for your symposia suggests for 2015 in this area. Please submit them to gdenis@bu.edu.

We thank our supporters the American Institute for Cancer Research (Susan Higginbotham, PhD, MPH, RD) and Susan G. Komen (Kendall Bergman), and reception sponsor the California Walnut Commission (Carol Sloan). Congratulations Gabrielle Turner-McGrievy, PhD, MS, RD, of the University of South Carolina who is the recipient of the Komen-supported Junior Faculty Travel Award announced during the session. We also congratulate early career researchers Kathrine D. Meyle, G. Craig Wood, Stephanie M. George and Erin Giles who were the recipients of cash awards sponsored by AICR for their research presented at ObesityWeek 2014. We are indebted to Shine Chang, PhD, of MD Anderson and Shameeka Green of TOS for their facilitation of our mission. Learn more about the Obesity & Cancer Section here.

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Time is running out! Get your free online CME for obesity management
TOS
TOS and Vindico Medical Education offer an Expert Video Interview Series live on TheDoctorschannel.Com. The series features leading obesity experts providing guidance for physicians on the importance of weight loss for health and identifying the best treatment plan to meet each individual's needs. The video series is available for a total of 2.0AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ (0.25 credits per video) and will expire on Dec. 17, 2014. Check out the materials online here and don't miss this opportunity to learn from the following obesity experts:
  • Ken Fujioka, MD, Scripps Clinic
  • Robert Kushner, MD, FACP, Northwestern University
  • Donna H. Ryan MD, FACP, Pennington Biomedical Research Center
  • Holly R. Wyatt, MD, University of Colorado Denver
  • W. Timothy Garvey, MD, UAB Diabetes Research and Training Center
  • Anne Wolf, MS, RD, Anne Wolf & Associates
TOS is proud to have participated in this effort as part of its Treat Obesity Seriously campaign, an effort to encourage the treatment of obesity as a disease and support healthcare providers in their work with people affected by obesity and overweight.

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Do you Treat Obesity Seriously™? Sign the Obesity Pledge
TOS
Do you treat obesity seriously? By signing the Obesity Pledge you can demonstrate your commitment to the cause and encourage your friends and colleagues to do the same. Add your voice to the many others who have signed on by saying:

"I believe obesity isn't just a problem. It's a disease that warrants serious evidence-based treatments. Nutritional and physical activity guidance. Intensive behavioral counseling. Drug therapy. And surgery. Agree to learn more and help more. I treat obesity seriously."

It's simple. Sign the pledge online with your mouse. Print your certificate and hang it on your office or practice wall. Share the pledge with your family, friends and colleagues. And, send a letter to your member of Congress expressing your support for legislation that improves access to treatment for obesity.

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  AirPal Patient Transfer System
AirPal Inc., the inventor of air-assisted lateral transfer systems for safe patient handling, offers a full line of reusable and disposable patient TransferPads for easy and comfortable lateral transfer between beds, gurneys, and procedure tables. The Full and Half-length SPS (Single Patient Stay) disposable TransferPads can stay under a patient during surgery and are particularly useful for injury-free transfer to and from the O.R. Contact info@airpal.com for the lowest prices in the market!
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Apply for the Dannon Institute: Develop leadership skills, promote excellence in nutritional science
TOS
The Dannon Institute Early Career Nutrition Leadership Institute is an intensive five-day training program designed to provide participants with strategies for improving their ability to lead others. The program is accepting applicants for the June 6 – 11, 2015 event. Qualified applicants will have demonstrated engagement in and commitment to current leadership roles in their universities and/or professional societies, as well as interest in taking future leadership roles.

Applicants must have earned a doctoral degree (PhD, MD or equivalent) in nutrition or a related subject. Preference is given to those who have completed their doctoral training in the last 3-5 years. Physicians completing their postdoctoral nutrition training, regardless of the number of years since they received their medical degree, are also eligible for this program. Find out more here.

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


FDA enforces nationwide calorie labeling
The Associated Press via CBS News
Whether they want to or not, consumers will soon know how many calories they are eating when ordering off the menu at chain restaurants, picking up prepared foods at supermarkets and even eating a tub of popcorn at the movie theater. The Food and Drug Administration is announcing long-delayed calorie labeling rules recently, requiring establishments that sell prepared foods and have 20 or more locations to post the calorie content of food "clearly and conspicuously" on their menus. Companies will have until November 2015 to comply.
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US obesity rates are even higher than we thought
LiveScience via The Huffington Post
The obesity rates of many U.S. states are actually higher than previously thought, a new study finds. The new findings are based on doctors' measurements of people's height and weight, whereas many previous reports were based on people's reports of their own measurements.
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A calorie's just a calorie ... Right?!
Prevention
Victoria Wolk writes: Even though I try to eat clean, there are still those days when there's no way I'm skipping dessert. To make up for the slab of chocolate cake (my weakness), I'll cut back somewhere else. After all, a calorie's a calorie, right? Not quite.
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ObesityWeek 2014: Are we making headway in obesity?
Health Central
Sessions presented at the ObesityWeek2014 conference were hosted by The Obesity Society and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. One ongoing discussion is the weight bias that exists among doctors and other health specialists and ways that can change. Doctors do need to broach the obesity discussion with new communication methods. Many of the experts agreed that lifestyle basics are the foundation of obesity care
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Which weighs more: 100 calories of turkey or 100 calories of gravy?
eMaxHealth
Sounds like the old trick question about which weighs more, 10 pounds of rocks or 10 pounds of feathers — after all, if a pound is a pound, shouldn't a calorie be a calorie? Not quite says a Prevention magazine article that points out that cutting back on a meal to save more calories for dessert just doesn't add up the way you would like it to.
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Study debunks manufacturer fears labeling added sugar would confuse consumers
FoodNavigator-USA.com
Most Americans believe knowing how much added sugar is in a food would be helpful, according to a recent study that contradicts food manufacturers' concerns that a proposal to differentiate added and naturally occurring sugar on the Nutrition Facts label would confuse consumers.
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Why some diets help you lose weight without making you feel hungry
The Washington Post
If there is a holy grail of dieting, it might be in the promise of losing weight without feeling hungry and deprived. But is that really possible? Reducing caloric intake and exercising more is still the best way to lose weight and then keep it off. But it turns out that there are some diets that can make it a little easier to cope with giving up that piece of chocolate cake.
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C-section and antibiotics during pregnancy increase childhood obesity risk
Examiner
A new study has reported that exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy and cesarean sections increase the risk of childhood obesity. The findings were published in the International Journal of Obesity. The study authors note that either a cesarean section or antibiotic use during pregnancy may alter normal maternal-offspring microbiota exchange (transfer of organisms between mother and fetus).
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The tipping point in obesity
ConscienHealth
Growing evidence for epigenetic effects of maternal health that transmit obesity from mother to child is part of this picture. A symposium at ObesityWeek 2014 provided an excellent overview of the emerging science on epigenetic mechanisms for transmitting obesity from generation to generation. Epigenetics involve changing the way our genes work without changing the genes themselves. And some of these changes can be inherited by subsequent generations.
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Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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