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Success in 2014
Letter from the President
Dear Colleagues,

Twenty-fourteen was another exciting year for The Obesity Society. Throughout the year, we continued to raise awareness of obesity research and treatment, and enhance interest in and support for our efforts. The Society celebrates these accomplishments and we thank you for your support.

Here are a few highlights:
  • Secured the highest attendance yet for the 2nd Annual ObesityWeek℠ Conference bringing together more than 5000 obesity professionals to share innovation and scientific breakthroughs in the field
  • Made progress toward expanding federal support of obesity treatment, including policy efforts to encourage insurance coverage of treatments, the addition of several new FDA-approved anti-obesity drugs to the treatment toolbox, and the launch of our Advocacy Action Center
  • Dramatically enhanced the Society's visibility and connections among our partner organizations, the news media and social media
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ASSOCIATION NEWS


U.S. Senate takes long-awaited action to confirm Surgeon General Vivek Murthy
TOS
Monday evening the United States Senate took long-awaited action to confirm Vivek Murthy, MD, as United States Surgeon General, a step The Obesity Society (TOS) calls promising for the future of obesity research and treatment.

"We congratulate Dr. Murthy on his confirmation and look forward to working with him to address obesity, one of our nation's most prevalent public health issues," said Nikhil Dhurandhar, PhD, TOS President in a press release. "Today, millions of Americans continue to be denied health insurance coverage for proven obesity treatments, and we hope that during his term Dr. Murthy makes a commitment to improving access to care for those affected by obesity and overweight."

In his comments during his February 4, 2014 confirmation hearing before the Senate Health Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, Dr. Murthy spoke passionately about his desire to actively address the nation’s obesity epidemic.

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One of the most difficult challenges in weight loss is keeping the weight off over the long term
TOS
A new report combining perspectives from a range of obesity experts identifies genetic, epigenetic and neuro-hormonal differences between individuals as one of the key challenges associated with weight loss and long-term weight control. The authors, led by Paul MacLean, PhD, and Rena Wing, PhD, reinforce that maintaining weight loss over the long term can be a major challenge. They recommend a number of novel approaches to improve obesity therapeutics, including more emphasis on an individualized approach to weight-loss treatments and maintenance, and the integration of physiology and behavioral psychology to identify effective and sustainable interventions.

"Despite advancements in our understanding of obesity, weight regain after weight loss remains the most substantial problem in obesity treatment — with both the body and the mind conspiring against individual efforts to maintain weight loss," said Dr. MacLean, co-chair of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) working group who authored the report, "Innovative Research to Improve Maintenance of Weight Loss," published in the January 2015 issue of the journal Obesity. "There are many differences in individuals ranging from genetic to behavioral that lead some to do well on one approach, whereas others do not. Therefore, what works for a friend or coworker may be very different from a weight-loss program that's most effective and sustainable for you over the long term."

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Last chance to submit ideas to the ObesityWeek 2015 symposium & speaker suggestion site!
TOS
Although ObesityWeek 2014 is not far behind us, TOS is already hard at work planning for ObesityWeek 2015 in Los Angeles, Cailf., Nov. 2-7. As part of this effort, TOS asks its members, partners, sponsors and other stakeholders for ideas on what would make great symposia for next year's conference. TOS Program Committee will then pull from the submitted ideas to compile a new and engaging agenda for ObesityWeek attendees to enjoy.

This is your last chance to submit ideas — the symposia suggestion site closes this Friday, December 19! Find out more and submit your suggestions here.

TOS offers our sincere gratitude to all of our submitters, and would love to include all ideas in the conference program. However, we regret that given the high quality and quantity of submissions we are not able to use all of your great ideas.

Further, as you prepare your suggestions, please do not submit duplicates from prior meetings or suggestions from other conferences you've attended. TOS Program Committee works hard to ensure ObesityWeek offers something fresh and new for our attendees.

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Looking for the perfect gift for an obesity professional? We have a few ideas
TOS
Just in time for the holidays TOS would like to give you the opportunity to fund a membership for our student and early career members. For as little as $30.00 you can contribute to the backbone of the Society. Don't waste another minute. To get started, simply find out more here. Once in the online donation portal, select the box to donate $30 for student and early career membership and fill in the details for the person you are gifting the membership to under the "Tribute" criteria, along with your personal message to the recipient. Then tell everyone how you are paying it forward on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Looking for other gift ideas? For a limited time, TOS is offering 10% off hardcopies of the Guidelines (2013) for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults: Full Report. This full report provides all of the background that went into the abbreviated, summarized version initially released in November 2013. Offered exclusively by TOS, the hardcopy edition is a go-to resource for health practitioners around the world. Whether you're shopping for a physician, nurse, nutritionist or fitness trainer, every professional interacting with individuals trying to lose weight can find value in this insightful treatment guide. Find out more about ordering your copy here and enter ONETIMETENOFF to secure a 10% discount.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Introducing the Obesity Hyperguide™
The Obesity Hyperguide™ is a free, interactive learning management system offering a unique, practice-relevant CME learning experience for professionals interested in managing and treating obese patients. Conveniently available 24/7, this web-based platform provides access to engaging educational content exclusively geared to meet your educational needs and improve your clinical practice.
 


Submit your research to Obesity Science & Practice!
Contributed by David B. Sarwer, PhD, Editor-in-Chief
Submit your research to Obesity Science & Practice, the new open access journal from TOS and World Obesity highlighting research related to obesity and its comorbidities.

Why publish open access with Obesity Science & Practice?
  • Access for everyone means wider circulation, higher visibility and larger readership
  • Faster publication times means your work gets seen as soon as possible
  • No compromise on quality; rigorous peer review ensures high standard of research
  • Ensure compliance with funder mandates
Find out more here.

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Don't miss World Obesity's 2015 Hot Topic Conference on dietary sugars
TOS
Consumption of dietary sugars has increased in the population, and excess sugar intake has been linked with development of obesity and associated metabolic outcomes. To help the obesity community understand the impacts of dietary sugar, World Obesity will be holding its 2015 Hot Topic Conference on dietary sugars, obesity and metabolic disease risk. The conference will take place from June 29 – 30, 2015 in Berlin, Germany.

Topics discussed at the conference will include sugar/soda taxes, warning signs on foods/beverages that are high in sugars and global trade policies. There are also numerous evolving controversies and discrepancies in this field of study that this conference will aim to resolve by bringing world experts together into an atmosphere of collegial sharing and consensus building.

This event will appeal to a broad inter-disciplinary mix of basic, clinical, epidemiological and population-based researchers working in the area of dietary sugars and obesity/metabolic diseases. This includes researchers, clinicians, health professionals, policy and public health scientists in addition to representatives from government, policy institutes and industry. Find out more here.

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Sign up for free clinician resources at Treat Obesity Seriously
TOS
Did you know that you can sign up to receive free clinician resources to improve conversations with patients about obesity on the Treat Obesity Seriously website? Sign up on the website (scroll to the bottom of the page) to get Treat Obesity Seriously clinician kits shipped to your practice, which include office posters, BMI wheels and BMI prescription pads. Also encourage your staff to take the Treat Obesity Seriously pledge and wear your lapel pins proudly.

Due to a technology glitch, orders for materials submitted earlier in the year may not have been fully processed. If you signed up in the last year and did not receive your materials, please email communications@obesity.org.

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Spotlight on new TOS Fellows!
TOS
Congratulations to our new Fellows of The Obesity Society (FTOS):
  • John Cleek, MD, FTOS — Vanderbilt Center For Medical Weight Loss
  • Corby Martin, PhD, FTOS — Pennington Biomedical Research Center
  • Joseph Ratliff, PhD, FTOS — Dr. Pepper Snapple Group
  • John Speakman, PhD, FTOS — University of Aberdeen
If you are interested in becoming a senior Fellow of The Obesity Society, please apply online here.

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  AirPal Patient Transfer System
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Obesity linked to specific hormone
Contributed by HealthCentral
A new study in Canada has identified a hormone that restricts brown adipose tissue — so-called "brown fat" — (brown fat), and they believe that that can increase the likelihood that a person will become obese.

Researchers from McMaster University in Ontario, tested how peripheral serotonin — the kind of serotonin that circulates in the blood, not the brain — limits the amount of brown fat activity. The study, published in Nature Medicine, is the first to show that blocking this type of serotonin makes brown fat more active in burning glucose, resulting in less weight gain.

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eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner
Contributed by eHealth/mHealth Section
To keep the community up to date on the developments in this important area, TOS eHealth/mHealth section offers the eHealth/mHealth Reading Corner. This week's articles include:
    Wright JA, Quintiliani L, Turner-McGrievy GM, Migneault JP, Hereen T, Friedman RH. The comparison of two theory-based, fully automated telephone interventions designed to maintain a recently acquired dietary change in healthy adults: Study protocol of a three-arm randomized controlled trial. JMIR Research Protocols. 2014 (Nov 10); 3(4):e62.
    http://www.researchprotocols.org/2014/4/e62/

    Shaw RJ, Steinberg DM, Zullig LL, Bosworth HB, Johnson CM, Davis LL. mHealth interventions for weight loss: a guide for achieving treatment fidelity. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2014 Nov-Dec;21(6):959-63.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24853065

    Hekler EB, Dubey G, McDonald DW, Poole ES,Li V, Eikey E. Exploring the Relationship Between Changes in Weight and Utterances in an Online Weight Loss Forum: A Content and Correlational Analysis Study . J Med Internet Res 2014;16(12):e254).
    http://www.jmir.org/2014/12/e254
If you have an article you would like to share, we would love to hear from you! Please send article information to Danielle Schoffman (schoffmd@email.sc.edu), and we'll add it to the EMS Reading Corner Library.

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OBESITY IN THE NEWS


Advances in obesity management: 2014
Medscape
Last year, physician members of the American Medical Association approved a policy that labeled obesity as a disease that requires a range of medical interventions. They said the move was part of an effort to advance obesity treatment and prevention. So, where are we more than a year later?
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Is weight loss overrated?
ConscienHealth
With all the energy and money that goes into it, we wonder, is weight loss overrated? Could it be that long-term weight maintenance strategies are much more important? Certainly, weight maintenance seems to be the biggest challenge if you look at the natural progression of obesity and its treatment over time. By comparison, weight loss is pretty straightforward and quick.
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Surgeon general to tackle obesity epidemic
Healio
The Obesity Society released a statement calling the confirmation of Vivek Murthy, MD, as U.S. Surgeon General a promising step for the future of obesity research and treatment. "We congratulate Dr. Murthy on his confirmation and look forward to working with him to address obesity, one of our nation's most prevalent public health issues," Nikhil Dhurandhar, Ph.D., president of The Obesity Society, said in the release. "Today, millions of Americans continue to be denied health insurance coverage for proven obesity treatments, and we hope that during his term Dr. Murthy makes a commitment to improving access to care for those affected by obesity and overweight."
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Does snoring leave tots more vulnerable to childhood obesity?
NPR
A solid night's sleep does more than recharge a growing brain — it may also help keep a growing body lean. Breathing problems or a chronic lack of sleep early in life may double the risk that a child will be obese by age 15, according to research published in The Journal of Pediatrics.
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Is my doctor fat phobic?
Psychology Today
Just like the rest of Americans, healthcare providers carry weight biases. That means that your physician, nurse, dietician, psychologist and fitness professional may hold discriminatory attitudes about fat people. Studies consistently document weight bias in healthcare providers, including the tendency to view obese patients as lazy, lacking in self-control, undisciplined, and noncompliant with treatment. Furthermore, they believe that these traits are the causes of obesity
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What you need to know about diabetes
LIVESTRONG.COM
Odds are you may have a loved one or a friend with diabetes, but you may be unaware that more and more people are being diagnosed with diabetes across the United States. In fact, type 2 diabetes affects at least one in every 10 Americans. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates it will affect one in every three Americans by 2050.
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Overweight, obesity in black women linked to occupational sitting
Healio
Black women who sit more than 30 minutes a day at work are more likely to be obese or overweight compared with those who sit less than 30 minutes, according to recent study findings published in Preventing Chronic Disease.
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Aging, obese crash test dummies in development to replicate US population
AOL Autos
America's well-publicized weight problem and aging population of baby boomers is collaborating to bring about a change in the humble crash test dummy, as automakers and safety regulators are attempting to build vehicles even better suited to our changing population.
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Timing of 1st period tied to later heart risk
HealthDay News via WebMD
The timing of a woman's first period may be linked to her later risk of heart disease, British researchers report. In a study of more than 1 million women, those who had their first period at age 10 or younger, or at age 17 or older, appeared to have a higher risk of heart disease, stroke and complications from high blood pressure.
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Dietary recommendations: Why are they so confusing?
WeighingIn Blog
Karen Switkowski, MPH, MS, writes: I often hear people express frustration with nutritional guidelines and recommendations. It can be difficult to find a reliable source of information given the influence of politics, the media, and the food and beverage industry on nutrition research. Even when studies are conducted according to high scientific standards and reported appropriately in the media, they often contradict one another or are difficult to interpret.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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