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Happy holidays from The Obesity Society! Let's take a moment to look back on the exciting events of 2014 with a special edition of the eNewsletter highlighting some of the top news stories out of the Obesity journal this year.

Unprecedented level of research unveiled in full obesity guidelines expert panel report
TOS
The Obesity Society took the next step to advance the treatment of obesity by publishing an unprecedented level of obesity research, in print and online, as a supplement to its July and August issues of the Obesity journal: Guidelines (2013) for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults: Full Report. Now, the print version of the supplement is available for purchase as a reference guide for obesity treatment.
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The future of obesity treatment: What works
Healthline
As many of us take on New Year’s resolutions to shed pounds, a new study shows which types of treatment work best. The study offers long-term data to support the use of intensive lifestyle intervention as a viable weight loss tool.
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The truth about menu labeling
Women's Health
Food labels have a bit of a controversial history in the U.S. Are they inadequate? Do they need to be updated? Do they even help people make healthier choices? But a new study presented this week at the Obesity Journal Symposium — the first long-term look at calorie labeling — shows that labels actually help prevent weight gain, after all.
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An unmet need in medical training: Addressing weight bias
Medscape
Rising obesity rates in recent decades have been coupled with widespread societal stigma and bias toward individuals who are affected by obesity. This form of bias, also known as "weight bias," has been consistently documented in multiple daily life settings, including the workplace, educational institutions, the media, and unfortunately the healthcare setting. Healthcare providers across a range of specialty areas have been shown to harbor negative stereotypes toward patients with obesity, including biases that these patients are lazy, lacking in self-control, noncompliant with treatment, unsuccessful, and dishonest.
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Weight Watchers tops in efficacy vs. cost
MedPage Today
Among the most popular diet programs and drugs, Weight Watchers trims the most bulge for the buck, according to a new cost-effectiveness analysis. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year was $34,630 for Weight Watchers, well under the commonly accepted threshold of $50,000, Eric Finkelstein, PhD, of Duke University, and colleagues reported in the journal Obesity.
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Gestational weight gain in obese women better with program
Medscape
Obese women who took part in a weight management program during pregnancy gained significantly less gestational weight and had a lower proportion of large-for-gestational age babies than obese women who received only one-time dietary advice, investigators found.
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Metabolic effects of The Biggest Loser
ConscienHealth
Who knew that any evidence base existed for the metabolic effects of The Biggest Loser? A new study just published online in Obesity compares effects of participating in The Biggest Loser to bariatric surgery. In fact, this is the second publication of data from The Biggest Loser collected by researchers from the NIH, Pennington Biomedical Research Center and UCLA.
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Fitness trackers may help older folks lose weight
The Washington Post
Fitness trackers have become popular in recent years for people who want to monitor their activity and track aspects of their workouts. A recent study shows they may be effective in helping older people lose weight.
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Americans increasingly supportive of anti-discrimination laws for obesity
Healio
A recent survey of public opinion showed that a majority of the American public favors laws that would limit discrimination against people with obesity. At least 75 percent of survey participants said they support laws that would limit discrimination based on body weight in the workplace, with views growing more favorable in recent years. Most study participants also said that body weight should be protected from discrimination by additions to civil rights statutes.
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Study debunks manufacturer fears labeling added sugar would confuse consumers
FoodNavigator-USA
Most Americans believe knowing how much added sugar is in a food would be helpful, according to a recent study that contradicts food manufacturers' concerns that a proposal to differentiate added and naturally occurring sugar on the nutrition facts label would confuse consumers.
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Obese and pregnant: An intervention that works
Time
Obesity during pregnancy is a dangerous mix for both mom and baby. A mother's obesity during pregnancy is linked to a greater likelihood for gestational diabetes, birth injuries, miscarriage, and a higher rate of C-sections. A child born to an obese mother is at a higher risk of developing obesity down the line, too.
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Study: 'Fat shaming' linked to weight gain
HealthDay News via Health
Discrimination against overweight or obese people, commonly known as "fat shaming," does not help them lose weight and may do more harm than good, according to research from London. Being harassed or treated with disrespect, receiving poor service while shopping or being thought of as stupid may actually lead to more weight gain, the researchers found.
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The diet soda debate
WebMD
When you're trying to lose weight or keep off extra pounds, can diet soda help? While it has fewer calories than regular soda, some studies show it fuels your sweet tooth. Also, are artificially sweetened sodas good for your health? Several studies this year continue the debate.
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Obese smokers show impaired perception of high-fat and sweet foods
Examiner
People who smoke also tend to eat more high-fat foods, and obese people eat more high-fat foods, says a new study, "Cigarette smoking and obesity are associated with decreased fat perception in women," published in the April 2014 issue of the journal Obesity.
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Sports drinks for the non-sporty cause weight gain
Inside Science via The Philadelphia Inquirer
Elite athletes down sports drink to help them reach new heights of performance. But for the average young person, these "health drinks" may cause them to reach new highs — on the bathroom scale. A new study published in the journal Obesity suggests that young people who consume one or more sports drinks each day gained more weight over a three year period than classmates who chose other beverages.
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The Obesity Society eNews
Mollie Turner, News Editor, The Obesity Society  
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Caitlin McNeely, Senior Editor, 469.420.2692   
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Disclaimer: eNews is a digest of the most important news selected for The Obesity Society from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Obesity Society does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of The Obesity Society.

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