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Fencing and private land stewardship go hand-in-hand to keep sheep from getting nose-to-nose
WSF and B.C. Sheep Separation Program
Domestic sheep and wild sheep herds are dangerous liaisons. Although the two species are genetically similar, wild sheep can experience catastrophic die‐offs and suffer chronic long-term effects from respiratory diseases that domestic sheep carry. This has happened many times, on bighorn sheep ranges across western North America, sometimes after a single nose‐to‐nose contact between one wild sheep and one domestic sheep. The B.C. Sheep Separation Program has been working to reduce the risk of such an event occurring to the Bull River bighorn sheep herd in the Rocky Mountain Trench near Cranbrook, British Columbia.
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Utah bull elk tests positive for CWD
goHUNT
The Utah Department of Agriculture has confirmed that a bull elk shot in a private Utah high fence hunting ranch has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease. It is not yet known where the CWD originated, but Howe's Elk Ranch near Blanding, Utah, is currently under quarantine while officials investigate.
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Herd's end could help others in the West
The Associated Press via The Argus Observer
The Sheep Mountain herd of bighorns on the Idaho-Oregon border once contained nearly 90 members until the arrival of bacterial pneumonia. Now, biologists plan to use a helicopter to capture the three known survivors in Idaho and search for others that might be on the Oregon side of the Snake River in the upper end of Hells Canyon.
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Meopta announces partnership with Sheep Shape TV
AmmoLand
Meopta, the industry's leading designer and manufacturer of premium sports optics, is proud to announce its sponsorship of a new television series called "Sheep Shape." This new show will air on Sportsman Channel and follows four hunters on one of the most extreme and difficult mountain hunting quests in North America — hunting wild sheep. "Sheep Shape" tests the mind, body and soul of each hunter by first putting them through a grueling training program to prepare for these difficult high country hunts.

In addition to the June 22 - Sept. 6 airings on Sportsman Channel, there will be marathon runs of Sheep Shape TV on the following dates:

  • 4-8 p.m. EST, on Saturdays, Aug. 24-Sept. 6.
  • 4-8 p.m. EST, on Saturdays, Oct. 19-Nov. 1.

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    Bill would create new Game and Parks district for northwest Nebraska
    The Chadron Record
    Five counties in the northwest part of Nebraska are home to mountain lions, bighorn sheep, forests, Fort Robinson State Park and a chunk of the Cowboy Trail. With all that recreation — canoeing, camping, hiking and hunting — and acres and acres of public land, the state senator who represents the area thinks it should have its own representative on the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.
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    *Image: Stone sheep horn carving
     


    Arizona must change rules allowing helicopters near bighorns
    The Associated Press via KTVK-TV
    Forest officials in central Arizona have been ordered to revise a proposal that would allow state wildlife officials to land helicopters in wilderness areas to manage bighorn sheep. Conservationists applauded the response to an objection they filed over the Tonto National Forest proposal. They say it violates the Wilderness Act, which generally prohibits helicopter landings and motorized travel in wilderness areas.
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    Annual winter survey: Yellowstone elk population going up
    Tech Times
    Yellowstone elk numbers are up, according to the 2015 winter count done by the Northern Yellowstone Cooperative Wildlife Working Group. The survey, carried out Jan. 20, was conducted by staff from the National Park Service and the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks. With the help of three airplanes, the staff was able to count 4,844 elk, 77 percent of which were north of the Yellowstone National Park, while the remaining 23 percent were inside the park.
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    SCI: Wyoming bull is largest ever shot with a crossbow
    Field & Stream
    Albert Henderson, a hunter from Burlington, Wyoming, proved that it isn't impossible to find trophy-sized animals on public land, when he arrowed a 426 1/8 inch elk in Shoshone National Forest in September 2014. The animal is now being hailed as the biggest bull ever shot with a crossbow, according to the Safari Club International scoring system.
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    Public input published on Olympic National Park wilderness, mountain goat plans
    Peninsula Daily News
    Want to find out what people are saying about how Olympic National Park should manage mountain goats and park wilderness? Get ready to read.
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    Mountain goats have adapted to living at high elevations
    The News Tribune
    Have you ever gone rock climbing, hiked on the side of a mountain or scaled a steep hill just for fun? What if you had to do that with hooves instead of your hands and feet? Amazingly, there's an animal that is not only able to do that, but is an expert at it. Mountain goats, related to antelopes, are the ultimate cliff climbers — and are perfectly suited for mountain life.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        End of bighorn sheep herd could help others throughout West (The Associated Press via Houston Chronicle)
    Monarch of the mountain (goHUNT)
    Bighorns and domestic sheep are incompatible; that worries sheep producers (Montana Public Radio)
    Deer breeders, privatizing wildlife draws criticism (Outdoor News Daily)
    British Columbia: Bighorn sheep in Similkameen threatened by mites (CBC News)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
     

    Mountain Minutes
    Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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    Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608   
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