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Studying the sheep of Whiskey Mountain
The Ranger
The sun rose on a 40-by-40-foot net suspended a dozen feet above a frosty slope on Torrey Rim as Dubois High School students Kurt Leseberg and Rowan Hawk sat in their pickup truck and watched it through the blowing snow. One hour, two hours passed as the smell of apple pulp drew bighorn sheep one by one under the hanging trap. Suddenly, when nine animals were breakfasting on fruity food, the net dropped, and the boys sprinted side by side with their biology teacher Randy Campbell and half a dozen others towards an entangled ewe.
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President/CEO Gray Thornton renews employment agreement
WSF
The Wild Sheep Foundation is pleased to announce that Gray Thornton has agreed to a five-year employment agreement to continue to serve as the Foundation's President/CEO.
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Bighorn brouhaha
Outdoor News
There's an elephant in the room and it's not the standard 15,000-pound variety with 10-foot-long tusks. This one comes in the form of a desert bighorn sheep weighing in at a couple hundred pounds with massive horns that account for 10 percent of their body weight. And there's no gray area in this conundrum. You're either in full support of — or in vocal opposition to — the prospect of reintroducing bighorn into the Catalina Mountain range surrounding Tucson, Ariz., once their historical home until they were extirpated because of factors such as urbanization and predation.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    A caretaker and a killer: How hunters can save the wilderness (WSF via The Atlantic)
Planning for a dream hunting trip (OutdoorHub)
Bighorn sheep fence may be on the way (KESQ-TV)
Expected announcement from US FWS will close elephant imports from Zimbabwe, Tanzania (WSF via SCI)
Choosing the right bullets for predator hunting (By John McAdams)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


North Dakota bighorn sheep population stable
The Washington Times
An annual survey has concluded that North Dakota's bighorn sheep population is stable. The Game and Fish Department says the March survey revealed a minimum of 293 bighorns in western North Dakota, virtually unchanged from the previous count of 297 last summer. Biologists counted 85 rams, 159 ewes and 49 lambs. Not included in the count are 24 sheep introduced from Alberta, Canada, in February and about 30 bighorns in the North Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park.
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Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep transported to their historical range
Los Angeles Times
Bighorn sheep are skilled mountain climbers. But one group recently made it over the Sierra Nevada crest in record time. As part of an ongoing effort to return endangered Sierra Nevada bighorns to more of their historical range, state and federal wildlife workers captured 14 of the animals in the Inyo National Forest and transported them by helicopter to the Big Arroyo area of Sequoia National Park on the range's west side.
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Cody area has timeless connection to diverse wildlife
Yellowstone Gate
Hundreds of thousands of visitors come each year to Cody, Wyo., equipped with cameras and binoculars, hoping to see an elk, moose, pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, whitetail deer or mule deer. Kevin Hurley remembers seeing them all in a single day. "It was in April of 1986, and one of those watershed moments I'll always remember," said Hurley, conservation director for the Wild Sheep Foundation in Cody, where there are more bighorn sheep than anywhere else in the state.
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Bighorn brouhaha
Outdoor News
There's an elephant in the room and it's not the standard 15,000-pound variety with 10-foot-long tusks.

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A caretaker and a killer: How hunters can save the wilderness
WSF via The Atlantic
By Tovar Cerulli: "Fourteen years ago, I stood in the snow, struggling to digest what I had heard. A group of us, gathered to learn about monitoring and protecting wildlife habitat, had just discovered that our instructor — Sue Morse, founder of Keeping Track — was a deer hunter.

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Planning for a dream hunting trip
OutdoorHub
Derrek Sigler for OurdoorHub, writes: "How many times have you seen someone on a social media site posing the question, 'If you could go anywhere and hunt anything, what would it be?'"

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Hunters raise money to support Catalina Bighorn Sheep Project
KOLD-TV
A group of hunters are selling vehicle decals to help support the Catalina Bighorn Sheep Reintroduction project. There are two designs to choose from, those interested in helping may purchase either design for $5. The hunters are also producing a documentary called "The Mountain Project." It follows a group of hunters and shows their ups and downs of hunting. The Mountain Project's Facebook page describes it as "Five hunters. Five hunts. Five mountains. Five species. One epic story."
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Bringing bighorns back from the brink
The Inyo Register
Sierra bighorn sheep spend much of their lives nimbly navigating around cliffs and along rocky ledges far above timberline, displaying an uncanny ability to scramble around what appears to be imminent danger. And for almost 20 years, the bighorns' balancing act has been shadowed by the Sierra Nevada Bighorn Sheep Foundation. The non-profit group originally worked to pull the bighorns back from the brink of extinction, and is currently working to expand its reach so it can keep up with a string of successes that has seen a steady increase in the number of Sierra bighorn, and successful efforts to transplant and reintroduce the iconic animal to two more of its historic ranges in the Sierra.
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Mountain Minutes
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Brent Mangum, Content Editor, 469.420.2602   
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