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WSF weighs in on US Sheep Experiment Station
WSF
Dear Dr. Jacobs-Young:

On behalf of thousands of wild sheep conservationists, the Wild Sheep Foundation provides these comments for the report, which Agricultural Research Service is preparing for Congress, concerning the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station in Dubois, Idaho.

Over the past decade or more, WSF and our Idaho and Montana WSF Chapters have closely followed and commented on activities conducted by USSES, including expressing serious concerns over domestic sheep grazing in high-elevation mountain allotments (both ARS and U.S. Forest Service [USFS] lands) in the Centennial Mountains, on and near bighorn sheep habitat along the Idaho/Montana border. In the recent past, WSF has provided funding to assist state wildlife agencies in Idaho and Montana in conducting inventory surveys and telemetry studies on seasonal/daily movements and fine-scale habitat selection by bighorn sheep in this area. Our concerns are warranted.

Click here to see posting on WSF website. Click "Read More" to see the original letter from WSF to USDA Agricultural Research Service.
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 Industry News


Researchers: Is trophy hunting affecting bighorn sheep evolution?
Phys.org
Trophy hunters prize the Alberta, Canada, bighorn sheep. They aim to adorn their walls with the largest rams' horns they can obtain. In the past thirty years, average horn size has decreased, causing some scientists to believe trophy hunting is creating evolutionary pressure favoring rams with smaller horns. However, Lochran Traill and colleagues have created a model that simulates selective hunting and found it does not create a strong evolutionary response.
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Hunting, fishing licenses on sale Aug. 15
KTAB-TV
Every year, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department issues about 2.5 million hunting and fishing licenses through the agency's 28 field offices, more than 50 state parks and at over 1,700 retailers across the state. Licenses may also be purchased online through the TPWD website at www.tpwd.state.tx.us/buy or by phone at 1-800-895-4248. Call center hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. There is a required $5 convenience fee for each phone or online transaction.
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Defining a new ethic in hunting
Outdoor News Daily
The ethical issue isn't the 350-yard shot. The real concern, as Boone and Crockett Club sees it, is hunters not trying to get a closer one. Long-range shooting is a hot topic in hunting. Improved and specialized guns, gear, bullets and sniper skills are growing in popularity, stretching the lethal range of hunters further than ever before. But many hunters wonder how it all fits with traditional, ethical standards. How far is too far to be considered fair chase? Boone and Crockett adopted a new position statement to help define the ethics of taking game from long range.
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Breakout bow season: How to pattern a giant, opening-day buck
Field & Stream
Is there a better way to kick off your best bow season? Bob Borowiak has tagged 30-some Pope and Young bucks, half of them during the first week of Minnesota's archery season and several on the very first day. Here's his blueprint for taking a quick buck.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How to map your hunting area (Outdoor Life)
Study: Hunting pressure not causing evolution of smaller bighorn sheep in Alberta, Canada (The Canadian Press via CTV News)
Helicopter use to monitor bighorns generates concern (The Arizona Republic)
Shotguns for deer: Will the sabot slug go extinct? (Field & Stream)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


South Dakota: Will mountain lion season be opened to nonresidents?
Black Hills Pioneer
The state Game, Fish and Parks Commission recently decided against making changes to the 2014-2015 hunting season for mountain lions in South Dakota, and one member raised the possibility of allowing nonresident hunters in the future.
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11 mistakes elk hunters make and how to avoid them
Outdoor Life
Hunting expert Wayne Van Zwoll writes: If you've killed a mature bull elk, you're among a fortunate few. In Montana, bulls at least seven years old make up one percent of the herd. Access to them is limited by a draw, and in top units the odds of pulling a tag are less than one percent. The good news: You needn't draw into a trophy unit or kill a record-book bull to succeed as an elk hunter. But you must do a few things right.
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Camouflage: What matters in the big-buck industry?
By Jed Pritchard
So many choices. Real this and mossy that. Timber spooks and prairie switches, to name a few. It's big business. Over the years camouflage has evolved from granddad's plaid shirt to a gazillion-dollar industry powered by marketing professionals in pursuit of the almighty dollar. Truth is, choosing your camouflage from professionally staged photographs in glossy magazines can be a big mistake. If you work hard for your money and don't intend on dropping a 10-pound sack of $20 bills for new camouflage every fall, you may want to read on.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, Keywords HUNTING GEAR.


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Battle over bears: Maine hunting practices again in voters' hands
Bangor Daily News
Branches screeched across the windshield of the old Toyota pickup as Troy White drove deeper into the Maine wilderness on an old logging road. Bear bait — buckets filled with crumbling pastries and skinned beaver — rattled against a tree stand in the truck bed.

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Outdoorsmen develop hunting app
KNOE-TV
Many of you enjoy hunting and you only have a few more months until you can bring out the camo. To help avoid hunting related accidents, two outdoors men have developed an app.

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Montana: Groups vie to auction handful of big game licenses
The Montana Standard
Bidding wars on coveted big game hunting tags are common at conservation group gatherings, but recently, a couple of those groups were vying against each other to be the auctioneer of some of the popular Montana tags.

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Washington: Dangerous Olympic goats may face eviction
KUOW
They may be beautiful to look at in the wild, but with their sharp horns, mountain goats have been a cause of concern in the Olympic National Park in Washington, especially since a goat fatally gored a 63-year-old hiker in 2010. As part of their mountain goat action plan, the National Parks Service is considering a change of scenery for the animals. The goats may be moved to another mountain range in Washington that has seen a decline in the goat population, according to Parks spokeswoman Barb Maynes.
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Looking to share your expertise?
MultiBriefs
In an effort to enhance the overall content of Mountain Minutes, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of WSF, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit. Our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.
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ScopeSlicker and SpudzPro: Gear for helping keep your scope spot-on
Women's Outdoor News
Hunter Michelle Whitney Bodenheimer writes: As a hunter, I have invested a significant amount of money into my rifles and riflescopes. I protect my investments the best I am able, in order to help make certain they are ready to perform when I am afield. Sometimes, however, the weather has other ideas and interferes with the clarity of my scope, especially here in the Pacific Northwest where I battle rain, snow and fog on a regular basis. Fortunately, I recently discovered the ScopeSlicker and SpudzPro, both by Alpine Innovations. Each of these small items helps in keeping my scope clean, clear and spot-on.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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