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American Wildlife Conservation Partnership letter to the major airlines
WSF
Led by Wild Sheep Foundation Conservation Director Kevin Hurley, the American Wildlife Conservation Partnership (AWCP), comprised of more than 40 mainstream conservation organizations in North America, crafted and submitted a letter to the heads of four major airlines, respectfully requesting these airlines to rescind their recent policies banning transport/shipment of legally-acquired specimens from Africa. The AWCP letter points out the false assumption made by these airlines that banning shipment of legally-taken trophies will assist in the conservation and management of Africa's wildlife.
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Hunting bans in Africa affect rural residents, create havens for poachers
OutdoorHub
Calls for hunting bans in Africa are not a new phenomenon, yet with recent events, such as the death of Cecil the lion, a popular male lion that the Zimbabwe government claims was poached, many anti-hunting groups are once again urging African nations to close their doors to hunters. In the past, these petitions have been mostly ignored, except for a few notable exceptions, such as Botswana. Two years ago the southern African nation surprised many of its neighbors when it announced a blanket ban on trophy hunting. Yet instead of increasing populations of wildlife, many critics of the hunting ban said it will instead lead to unemployment, economic turmoil, increased poaching and, perhaps worst of all, even endanger the very wildlife that the ban was trying to protect.
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ESA protection 'not warranted' for sage grouse, given collaborative conservation plans
The Spokesman-Review
A formal announcement is scheduled in Colorado, but the U.S. Interior Department has decided federal protections for the greater sage grouse are "not warranted" at this time, following costly efforts to reverse the species' decline without reshaping the region's economy. In a video posted on the department's website, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell cited extensive, collaborative conservation efforts. "Because of an unprecedented effort by dozens of partners across 11 western states, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the greater sage-grouse does not require protection under the Endangered Species Act," she said.
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Bighorn sheep survey shows mixed results
Devils Lake Journal
Results from this summer's bighorn sheep survey indicate North Dakota's bighorn population has increased from last year, despite the ongoing presence of pneumonia.
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Bacterial pneumonia resurfaces in North Dakota bighorn sheep
The Associated Press via The Washington Times
Bacterial pneumonia that killed dozens of bighorn sheep in the western North Dakota Badlands last year has resurfaced this summer, sparking fears it will become an even bigger problem in the region.
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Despite occasional setbacks, sheep in Nebraska are thriving
The Star-Herald
Bighorn sheep can thrive on prairie forage, prance lightly along precarious trails in steep terrain and fend off predators. They have a tougher time surviving hungry humans, habitat loss and occasional bouts of disease. Extirpated from their native range in Nebraska by hunting in the late 1800s, the muscular sheep are making a comeback in the Panhandle, thanks to efforts by the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission and cooperative landowners.
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The riddle of bighorn pneumonia: Lambs dying again
Yakima Herald-Republic
When pneumonia first began sweeping through the bighorn sheep along the Yakima River Canyon in the winter of 2009-10, state wildlife biologists knew they could lose them all. Similar outbreaks all but wiped out three herds in the Blue Mountains and in the Hells Canyon area of the Snake River between Idaho and Oregon. But rather than euthanize them all to prevent the outbreak from spreading state experts decided to try something different.
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Exotic sheep hunting affordable, fun
The Port Arthur News
Exotic hunting is a big industry in Texas. From a handful of species available to hunt in the 1960s, we now have more than 40 from around the world available on Texas ranches. Let's talk about some affordable species that you can hunt without breaking the bank, namely, the exotic sheep.
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Idaho considering private hunting bids that would lock up state land
The Spokesman-Review
State officials are debating if they should allow groups to lease public land in a way that could prevent public access. The fact that this debate is even occurring is a slap in the face to the average sportsman who depends on public lands for hunting and fishing access.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Long-lived toothless mountain goat shocks wildlife experts (Standard Examiner)
6 guns every hunter needs to own (By John McAdams)
Bighorns climb road to recovery (Globe Gazette)
1st Texas desert bighorn state record recognized (goHUNT)
Wyoming biologists predict especially good season for elk (Outdoor Daily News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Mountain Minutes
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Rebecca Eberhardt, Content Editor, 469.420.2608   
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