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Report proposes new 'vital signs' to measure the nation's health
Harvard Health Blog
Doctors use vital signs as a relatively straightforward way to detect an illness or monitor a person's health. Key ones include blood pressure, body temperature, breathing rate, and heart rate. A report from the newly christened National Academy of Medicine proposes using 15 "vital signs" to track how healthcare in the United States measures up. Healthcare costs in the U.S. are the highest in the world, yet people in many countries that spend less on healthcare are in better health overall and have better healthcare outcomes.
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OFFICE-BASED SURGERY


FDA clears Roche's cobas Cdiff test to detect Clostridium difficile
medicaldevice-network.com
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has provided 510(k) clearance to Roche to use the cobas Cdiff test to detect Clostridium difficile in stool specimens. By targeting the toxin B gene found in toxigenic C. difficile strains directly in specimens from symptomatic patients, the cobas Cdiff test provides accurate data that helps clinicians in making timely treatment decisions, while aiding in prevention of further infection in healthcare settings.
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Scientists identify origins of process that is key to diabetes
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation via Medical News Today
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have pinpointed a cell that begins the process of scarring in fatty tissue. The findings cast new light on a biological process that occurs with obesity and can lead to diabetes. "Scarring can be an important part of the healing process when a person suffers an injury," said OMRF's Lorin Olson, Ph.D., who led the research. "But excessive scarring, or fibrosis, can contribute to many dangerous health conditions."
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Push for surgeons, hospitals to publish performance outcomes
WAtoday
The peak surgical body wants doctors to report their rate of poor outcomes, amid concerns that Australian patients are making decisions about their treatment in a void of information. The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons wants to expand its audit of surgical mortality, which collects all the deaths under the care of individual surgeons, to include complication rates. RACS counselor Guy Maddern, who chairs the surgical mortality audit, said not enough data was available about surgeons' outcomes.
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AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTERS


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Waste management is an important step for infection control
FacilitiesNet
When thinking about infection control in healthcare facilities, disinfection of touch surfaces, air filtration, and proper hand-washing policies leap to mind. But another area which is important to infection control, and the responsibility for which lies squarely with the facility management department, is waste management and disposal.
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10 potential Apple Watch medical apps physicians would use
MedPage Today
The Apple Watch launch date is quickly coming, and developers are already fast at work linking their current apps to the Apple Watch or creating entirely new types of apps to make use of the Apple Watch. The following are the types of medical apps the physician editors at iMedicalApps would be interested in seeing made for Apple Watch.
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RURAL HEALTH CLINICS


Nurse scope of practice expansion may help ease rural healthcare woes
New York Times via FierceHealthcare
As more states move to expand nurses' scope of practice, these measures may be especially vital in rural America, where healthcare access gaps are often the most glaring, according to the New York Times. In Nebraska, Republican Gov. Pete Ricketts signed legislation in March that allows nurse practitioners to perform duties they're nationally certified to perform without a physician's presence or approval. It was the 20th state to enact such a law, and eight more are considering similar legislation, according to the Times.
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Bringing hand hygiene compliance monitoring into the 21st century
Infection Control Today
The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology and Infection Prevention and Control Canada annual conferences are just around the corner. Industry leaders will come together to exchange knowledge and creative solutions toward our shared goal of reducing hospital-acquired infections and associated costs — financial and beyond. Many types of technology and solutions will be presented to enhance every aspect of the infection preventionist role, including hand hygiene compliance monitoring.
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OUTPATIENT PHYSICAL THERAPY CLINICS


Bold steps toward engineering new lungs
Medical Design Technology
According to the World Health Organization, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease currently affects more than 64 million people worldwide and is poised to become the third leading cause of mortality by 2030. There is no cure for the condition or ability to repair the scarring that has occurred. Thus, in the late stages of lung disease, one remedy exists: organ transplantation. Unfortunately, the combination of a severe shortage of donor organs and frequent rejection of the transplant by the recipient's immune system has made even this method of last resort impractical for many.
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Horses helped this vet with PTSD after no one else could
The Huffington Post
Sergeant Kirkson was in Iraq for only eight months, but when she came home she wasn't the same person. She began working as a preschool teacher. She thought being with young children would be healing and bring her peace. It didn't. She did everything to excess: work, exercise, dieting, physical therapy. She hoped it would build walls in her mind to help keep out the anxiety, the flashbacks and night terrors. Gradually she lost her connections with her family and friends. Anyone's physical touch was intolerable; her ability to trust anyone or anything had entirely ceased.
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Surgery can help stem the tide of pain, poverty
The Japan Times
Surgery is not a luxury. It needs to be a basic human right, because millions of people around the globe die each year or suffer lifelong disability from easily correctable conditions like obstructed labor or appendicitis. A number of readily teachable surgical procedures, performed in basic operating rooms, can stem much of the rising tide of human suffering. We associate surgery with space-age operating rooms filled with fancy equipment. A handful of medical conditions require that. But many do not.
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ASF INTERNATIONAL CLINICS


Ukraine faces looming HIV treatment shortage
AFP via Yahoo News
A group of Ukrainians infected with HIV warned on Wednesday that thousands could soon perish because the war-torn country was running out of treatment for the virus responsible for AIDS. The activists staged a poignant protest in which they marked out territory for a symbolic cemetery outside the government building in central Kiev. "We are calling on the prime minister and the government of Ukraine to avert this catastrophe," protest coordinator Volodymyr Zhovtyak said in a statement.
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Ghost doctors: The dark side of South Korean plastic surgery
South Korea Surgery
Plastic surgeons with little experience and at times without qualifications, known as "ghost doctors" who pass themselves off as licensed professionals, are causing serious harm to patients on South Korea's operating tables. Park H.I., a 26-year-old student from Cheonan, paid $10,680 in 2012 to sharpen his jaw line with cosmetic surgery but the procedure went awry, leaving him mutilated and suffering from edema and partial paralysis.
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How worried should we be about lassa fever?
KCUR-FM
An unidentified New Jersey man died after returning home from West Africa, where he had contracted Lassa fever, a virus that has symptoms similar to those of Ebola. Federal health officials are treating the case with caution because the virus, which commonly is spread by rodents, can occasionally spread from person to person.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The benefits of pre-surgery education (Gallup)
Botox vs. Xeomin: Study results are in (Cosmetic Surgery Times)
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Olympus mounts defense over deadly outbreaks tied to medical scopes (Los Angeles Times)

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