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America's healthiest seniors live in Minnesota
The Washington Post
The nation's most and least healthy seniors live on opposites ends of the Mississippi River, according to a new report. The seniors with the best health live in Minnesota, while those with the worst live in Mississippi. But, nationally, health among those age 65 or older is improving, according to the America's Health Rankings Senior Report, from the United Health Foundation. The report, out this month, assesses how seniors perform on 34 measures split into two related categories: actions that affect seniors' future health — known as determinants — and those that reflect past health, labeled outcomes.
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OFFICE-BASED SURGERY


Fillers and blindness: Do you include risks on patient consent forms?
Dermatology Times
Filler injections to the forehead can cause blindness, researchers confirmed in a recent study. In a panel discussion on best practices with injectables at last year's Vegas Cosmetic Surgery and Aesthetic Dermatology meeting, eight filler experts discussed this issue and agreed the risk of blindness associated with injectables should be included on patient consent forms.
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MIT scientists create product to combat baggy eyes
PRWeb via BusByway
The Connecticut Skin Institute has released a new shaping film that offers customers with baggy eyes a quick and non-invasive product that is promised to work within hours.
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Strep outbreak associated with liposuction surgery
MPR
An outbreak of severe group A Streptococcus infections among persons undergoing tumescent liposuction at unregulated outpatient cosmetic surgery facilities has raised concerns about the safety of these procedures in certain locations.
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AMBULATORY SURGICAL CENTERS


Moral distress in nursing
Keith Carlson
Whether in the ICU, the ER or other milieus, nurses can find themselves faced with morally distressing situations that may easily lead to feelings of burnout, compassion fatigue, cognitive dissonance, depression, anxiety and dissatisfaction.
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CMS proposes extension of Stage 1 meaningful use in EHRs
American Journal of Managed Care
A CMS proposal could extend the deadline for providers to transition to Stage 2 meaningful use of electronic health records. Agency officials said they received extensive feedback from health providers who felt they did not have enough time to efficiently transition their EHR systems.
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Medical breakthrough: Bioengineered heart tissue
Karen SC Ashley
For patients with heart damage, the best treatment option right now is an organ transplant. But with new research, the ideal solution — repairing the heart — may soon be possible. To mimic the heart's powerful mechanical action, scientists needed to engineer an artificial cardiac tissue similar in elasticity and biological properties to the native heart. That breakthrough has arrived: 3-D-engineered heart tissue that beats.
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RURAL HEALTH CLINICS


Why telemedicine is the future of healthcare
Jessica Taylor
Telemedicine is the hottest trend in the healthcare industry, and it is becoming more and more important to healthcare providers and patients around the world. According to medical professionals present at this year's ATA 2014 conference, telemedicine is the future of the healthcare industry. The trend is already backed by many hospitals and major health insurers, and the U.S. government recently endorsed telemedicine through Medicare and Medicaid.
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FDA approves new drug for hard-to-treat Colitis and Crohn's
HealthDay News via DoctorsLounge
Injections of Entyvio (vedolizumab) can be used to treat patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease who have had poor responses to one or more of the current standard therapies, the FDA says.
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Gamification concept used to quickly improve patients' blood pressure
redOrbit
The blood pressure control of patients seeing doctors and nurses participating in an online, competitive game to solve hypertension cases improved in a shorter amount of time than patients of non-gaming providers. The study findings were published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.
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OUTPATIENT PHYSICAL THERAPY CLINICS


Clay particles could help stimulate stem cell repair of damaged bone, tissue
Healio Orthopedics
University of Southampton researchers have provided insight on the ability of clay particles to bind biological molecules and stimulate the stem cell regeneration process to repair damaged tissue and bone.
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Physical therapy may not improve hip arthritis, study finds
HealthDay News via DoctorsLounge
Physical therapy for people with arthritis of the hip doesn't help relieve pain or improve function more than receiving a sham treatment, a new study by Australian researchers suggests.
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New target found for chronic pain treatment
Bioscience Technology
Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found a new target for treating chronic pain: an enzyme called PIP5K1C. By reducing the level of the enzyme, researchers showed that the levels of a crucial lipid called PIP2 in pain-sensing neurons is also lessened, thus decreasing pain.
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ASF INTERNATIONAL CLINICS


Chikungunya continues to spread across Caribbean
Medical Daily
Clinics and hospitals throughout the Caribbean are seeing people by the thousands, all experiencing searing headaches, burning fever, and debilitating joint pains. These symptoms are characteristic of the chikungunya virus. Experts fear it's only a matter of time before the outbreak reaches U.S. soil.
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Mosquito-dissecting robot could lead to coveted malaria vaccine
MedCity News
Biotech company Sanaria has spent the past decade working on a malaria vaccine that in early tests has shown tremendous potential to protect people from the deadly infection transmitted by mosquitoes. Now, to scale up, it's turning to the crowd to fund a robot that would speed up part of the production process by 20 to 30 times.
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Politics aside, medical tourism industry keeping close eye on Thailand
Medical Tourism Magazine
Even though most of Thailand has been calm and little if any military presence has been seen on the streets of Bangkok, the second coup in eight years and the 12th since the end of the absolute monarchy is likely to deal another blow to the once-thriving crowned prince of the medical tourism industry.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Spruce up your suturing: Try these techniques (Skin & Allergy News)
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AAAASF Week in Review

Colby Horton, Executive Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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