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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit       May 07, 2015

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Why you should care about the new MCAT
Premedlife
If you get bored, try imagining what medicine would look like if doctors actually did use all of the information they memorized for the MCAT. A man comes in the Emergency Department clinching his chest and collapses. Because I studied hard for the MCAT some four years earlier, I know exactly what to do. I shout with assurance to my staff, “This man won’t see the morning unless he gets a bimolecular elimination!
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AAEM NEWS


Showcase Your Research at MEMC-GREAT 2015 — Deadline May 31!
Call for Abstracts and CPC Competition Submissions — Join us in Rome, Italy from Sept. 5-9, 2015, for the Mediterranean Emergency Medicine Congress in conjunction with the Italian GREAT Network Congress. Register for the congress, submit an abstract and book your hotel! Look for more details to be announced soon. Learn more and register today!
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Merck Manual/AAEM Video Project

Help create “How-To” videos of >100 common procedures. These will be made available for free around the world in multiple languages on Merck Manuals websites and apps.

CLICK HERE to learn more.
 


Registration Now Open! — AAEM Fall Oral Board Review Course
Join us for the highly recommended Oral Board Review Course! NEW hands-on simulation practice. Be confident on exam day — prepare with the experts for the new format. Learn more and register.
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Prepare for Written Boards with AAEM — Register Today!
Join us in Orlando Aug. 18-21! Up to 27 lecture hours of intense review of EM board materials, taught by experienced emergency medicine faculty. This course is a comprehensive review of emergency medicine for all emergency physicians and is ideal for exam-takers or for physicians seeking quality review materials. Learn more!
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NEW: 2nd Edition of the Written Board Review Book
This comprehensive text will help prepare you for: Emergency medicine qualifying exam (formerly the “written boards”), Emergency medicine annual resident in-service exam, and the ConCert Exam. It includes over 200 color images, 225 question practice in-service examination, and 24 chapters written by experts in the field. Special member pricing, order today!
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Help us customize for you — Update your AAEM or AAEM/RSA profile!
Log into your account to let us know about any address, email, phone number updates, training & certification information, and professional practice work environment/setting information. Visit the AAEM member login or the AAEM/RSA member login today! Any problems logging in? Get in touch with us at info@aaem.org or 800-884-2236.
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Long Term Care Insurance Takes the Uncertainty Out of Retirement
To help educate AAEM members about long-term care solutions, we are partnering with ACSIA Partners LLC, one of the nation's premier experts in long-term care planning. ACSIA Partners has developed a comprehensive educational program to provide you with all the information you need to determine which type of long-term care solution is appropriate for you.
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HEALTHCARE POLICY NEWS


Medical schools approach nationwide enrollment goal
FierceHealthcare
Medical school enrollment will rise 30 percent within the next five years, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC) Survey of Medical School Enrollment Plans. By the 2019-2020 school year, AAMC projects, first-year medical school enrollment will hit 21,304, just 130 shy of the goal AAMC set as necessary to offset the physician shortage in 2006.
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Electronic record errors growing issue in lawsuits
Politico
Medical errors that can be traced to the automation of the U.S. health care system are increasingly an issue in medical malpractice lawsuits. Some of the doctors, attorneys and health IT experts involved in the litigation fear that safety and data integrity problems could undercut the benefits of electronic health records unless HHS and Congress address them aggressively.
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Studies: Hospitals fare better in states that expand Medicaid
McClatchy DC
In states that expanded eligibility for Medicaid, hospitals that handle large numbers of low-income patients are faring better under the Affordable Care Act than those in states that haven't, according to two new reports released by the Kaiser Family Foundation. The findings suggest that the health law, in states where it's fully implemented, is helping hospitals cut their uncompensated care costs, see fewer uninsured patients and increase their revenue from Medicaid, the state/federal health plan for the poor.
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Results from the 2015 GME matches: GME positions continue to grow
Health Affairs Blog
Recently the preliminary results from the 2015 National Resident Matching Program® (NRMP®) and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) Match were released. While final Match data from the NRMP will be released later this spring, the preliminary results from both programs provide important insights on Graduate Medical Education (GME) trends of interest in the policy community.
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RECENT STUDIES


Radiology report turnaround time: Effect on resident education
Academic Radiology
Residents are exposed to fewer ED studies after the implementation of a required 1-hour TAT. Overall, the current residents do not feel this decreased exposure to Emergency room studies affects their education. However, residents in training before and after this requirement feel their education has been significantly affected. Faculty perceives that the required TAT negatively affects their ability to teach, as well as the quality of resident education.
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Improved outcomes for emergency department patients whose ambulance off-stretcher time is not delayed
EMA
Patients arriving to the ED via ambulance and offloaded within 30 min experience better outcomes than those delayed. Given that offload delay is a modifiable predictor of an ED LOS of >4 h, targeted improvements in the ED arrival process for ambulance patients might be useful.
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NATIONAL NEWS


The personal political nature of medical care
Forbes
The medical care we receive and, in some instances, take for granted, has always been very personal and, since the enactment of Medicare, has also become very political. The personal nature of our medical care is characterized by a highly educated and professionally certified physician, caring for an individual patient. In a recent Physicians Foundation survey, 79 percent of physicians said that the relationship with their patients was the most rewarding and most satisfying aspect of medical practice.
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Mental Health Awareness Month aims to knock down stigma
By Jessica Taylor
Because of that stigma, it's harder for people who may need help to seek out the resources that are available to them. Since there’s no uniform treatment, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) states that untreated mental illness leads to more emergency department visits, hospitalizations, school failures, incarcerations, suicides and more suffering by individuals with mental illness and their families — and increases overall healthcare costs.
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12 telling points about physician stress and burnout
Physician's Money Digest
Perhaps he was good hiding it, but I don’t really remember my physician-dad being stressed out, burned out or unhappy, generally speaking, when it came to his career as a practicing physician. In fact, I think he loved the job — even with its many challenges, pressures, and stresses. Perhaps it was because he thought he was “the best” at what he did. So maybe it’s all about confidence.
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ED smoking cessation intervention pays off
Medscape (free login required)
Smokers visiting the emergency department (ED) are more than twice as likely to quit if they receive counseling, nicotine replacement therapy, and relevant referrals during their visit, according to a randomized controlled trial published online April 24 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. ED visits may be an ideal opportunity for smoking cessation interventions, according to Steven L. Bernstein, M.D., from the Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, and the Yale Cancer Center in New Haven, Connecticut, and colleagues.
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How to avoid health system staff turnover and employee poaching
By Scott E. Rupp
Staffing shortages and turnover problems have become two of healthcare's biggest problems. Not only is finding quality talent a problem, keeping it is, causing concerns for hiring managers and recruiters in the current healthcare economy. According to Health eCareers, turnover of hospital staff continues to be high, which results in big expenses for the organizations.
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Silence kills: Can technology drive meaningful cultural change in healthcare?
The Huffington Post (opinion)
A common perception in the healthcare industry is that the underlying cultural environment limits technological advances in safety and efficiency. Following this logic, no significant advances can be made until major cultural changes occur. However, what if technology was not necessarily limited by culture, but, if applied correctly, could actually be used to drive a desired cultural change?
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Emergency room violence prompts hospitals to tighten security
Healthcare Finance News
Several recent high-profile attacks against healthcare workers in U.S. hospitals have exposed dangerous flaws with security at healthcare providers, prompting hospitals administrators and even lawmakers to look for ways to better safeguard staff. In California, a bill recently approved in the state Assembly seeks to close one dangerous loophole in hospital security.
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Opioid prescribing in the ER: Are guidelines being followed?
MPR
In a study published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, researchers found that the majority of opioid prescriptions in the emergency department (ED) setting had a low pill count and were nearly all immediate-release formulations rather than long-acting medications. Scott G. Weiner, M.D., MPH, of Brigham and Women's Hospital, and collaborators designed an observational, multicenter, retrospective cohort study to gather data on opioid prescribing to consecutive patients presenting to 19 EDs during one week in October 2012.
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US emergency room visits keep climbing
The Wall Street Journal
Emergency-room visits continued to climb in the second year of the Affordable Care Act, contradicting the law’s supporters who had predicted a decline in traffic as more people gained access to doctors and other health-care providers. A survey of 2,098 emergency-room doctors conducted in March showed about three-quarters said visits had risen since January 2014. That was a significant uptick from a year earlier, when less than half of doctors surveyed reported an increase.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Physician compensation, dissatisfaction ratchet up (Health Leaders Media)
Cholecystitis on CT, check ultrasound before treating (Medscape (free login required))
Many hospital ERs aren't ready to treat children (The Wall Street Journal)
Potent 'spice' drug fuels rise in visits to emergency room (The New York Times)
Physician assistants grow, expand value-based care role (Forbes)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 



AAEM Insights
Colby Horton, Executive Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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