AAGP eNews
Sep. 23, 2014

New CME credit opportunity for PBS film Genius of Marian
AAGP
The Genius of Marian is an intimate and courageous portrait of filmmaker Banker White's 61-year-old mother, who is struggling with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. As importantly, it is a film in which paintings, home movies, photos and current footage come together to depict a family afflicted with Alzheimer's in two generations — and fighting to cope with loss while holding on to its collective memory.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Saint Louis University School of Medicine and WeOwn TV. Saint Louis University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

For more information, click here.More

Time is running out! GMHF scholar applications due Oct. 1

The Geriatric Mental Health Foundation's Scholars Fund was developed to expose medical students and young physicians to the rewarding field of geriatric psychiatry in an effort to increase the number of medical professionals expertly trained to care for the growing older population.

The Scholars Fund will provide for the mentorship and educational development of medical students and psychiatry residents through multiple opportunities to participate in the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (AAGP). It is the goal of this program to encourage residents and medical students to pursue specialized training in geriatrics. Through past efforts, AAGP has demonstrated that facilitating interactions in a structured manner between trainees and seasoned members in the field of geriatric psychiatry results in almost 75 percent of those trainee participants pursuing specialized geriatric fellowships.

For more information and to apply, click here.

To donate and support the GMHF Scholars Fund, click here.

The deadline to donate is Sept. 30, 2014.More

2015 Annual Meeting save the dates! Poster deadlines quickly approaching!

The theme of the 2015 Annual Meeting is Interprofessional Practice: Working Together to Meet the Mental Health Needs of Older Adults. Join us for the 2015 Annual Meeting to be held March 27-30 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

The AAGP Annual Meeting is the premier educational event in geriatric mental healthcare, providing the latest information on clinical care, research on aging and mental health, and models of care.

AAGP is now accepting poster proposals. New research poster proposals are due Oct. 1. Posters proposals from early investigators are due Oct. 16. See the call for proposals here.More

Brain may 'work around' early Alzheimer's damage
Medical News Today
One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease — the most common form of dementia — is the build-up of beta-amyloid protein deposits in the brain. Now a new study published in the journal Nature Neuroscience suggests that in some older people, the brain has a way of compensating for this damage by recruiting extra brain circuits. More

1 blood type increases memory problems; research examines dementia risk
Medical Daily
What can our blood tell us about our memory and thinking process? The red liquid coursing through our veins has more power over our brain function than scientists originally thought. A three-year research study has found individuals with blood type AB were twice as likely to experience memory problems as those with type O blood. The findings should come as no alarming news, according to experts, because there are other factors that impact dementia and memory risks more than blood types.More

Drugs for anxiety, sleep linked to Alzheimer's disease
By Denise A. Valenti
Drugs used to modify behavior in young or middle-aged adults may have serious consequences in later life. Recent research has demonstrated that extended use of benzodiazepine drugs — commonly used for the management of anxiety and sleep dysfunction — increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. The longer the drugs are in use for a patient, the greater the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. A major concern with the Alzheimer's-type dementia associated with the benzodiazepines is that the pathology may not be reversible.More

Neurologists call for adopting national dementia guidelines
The Express Tribune
Neurologists and physicians across the country must adopt standard national dementia guidelines to diagnose and treat Alzheimer and dementia patients in Pakistan. This was stated by Shifa International Hospital Consultant Neurologist Prof Arsalan Ahmad while addressing participants of a community awareness seminar at the hospital to mark World Alzheimer's Day.More

Brain may 'work around' early Alzheimer's damage
Medical News Today
One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease — the most common form of dementia — is the build-up of beta-amyloid protein deposits in the brain. Now a new study published in the journal Nature Neuroscience suggests that in some older people, the brain has a way of compensating for this damage by recruiting extra brain circuits.More

THC may slow or halt progression of Alzheimer's disease
News Medical
Extremely low levels of the compound in marijuana known as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from neuroscientists at the University of South Florida shows. Findings from the experiments, using a cellular model of Alzheimer's disease, were reported online in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.More

Could losing your sense of smell predict Alzheimer's?
By Dorothy L. Tengler
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive, degenerative disorder that attacks the brain's neurons, resulting in loss of memory, thinking and language skills and behavioral changes. It is the most common cause of dementia or loss of intellectual function among people aged 65 and older.More

Nursing homes vow to cut antipsychotic use in dementia patients
The Hill
Nursing homes are promising to reduce their use of antipsychotic medications on dementia patients 25 percent by 2016 and 30 percent by 2017. The public-private National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care announced its new goals as part of a wider effort to "re-think" care of elderly people with cognitive impairments. More

New insight on Alzheimer's: What increases your risk
TIME
The two seemingly unrelated conditions may be driven by similar unhealthy states, including high blood pressure and diabetes. The risk factors for the neurodegenerative disease affecting more than 5 million Americans aren't all in the brain. And a new report from Alzheimer’s Disease International highlights the connection between the disease of the brain and heart disease, says Heather Snyder, Ph.D., director of medical and scientific operations for the Alzheimer's Association. More