AAGP eNews
Dec. 31, 2013

True story: The prominent dad with dementia who refused to stop driving
Forbes
From Jan. 15: This story is based on actual facts. It reflects a dilemma faced by many families. What can you do when a strong minded elder should stop driving but refuses to do so?More

President's Column: You and AAGP
By David C. Steffens, MD, MHS
From July 30: It is a truism that the strength of any organization lies in the individual strengths, talents and involvement of its people. AAGP is a strong organization because its members are passionate about our field and are willing to devote time to advancing our clinical, research and educational missions. Over the past couple of years, AAGP has made several structural changes that will help empower members to get involved. Among these changes are the establishment of core committees, Clinical Practice, Research, and Teaching and Training, and the inclusion of each committee chair on the Board of Directors. I'd like to spend this President's Column highlighting these important committees in the hopes that you will consider joining one or more committees to add your voice and your talents to our organization.More

No increased risk for death with antipsychotics in Alzheimer's?
Medscape
From April 9: For years, clinicians have been warned that off-label use of antipsychotic medications to treat behavioral disturbances in patients with dementia could increase mortality. However, preliminary evidence from a new Japanese study appears to refute this tenet.More

Commonly prescribed drugs may influence the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease
ScienceDaily
From June 18: Multiple drug classes commonly prescribed for common medical conditions are capable of influencing the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at The Mount Sinai Medical Center. The findings are published online in the journal PLoS One.More

Study links dementia to sleep loss
Nursing Times
From Jan. 29: A link between sleep deprivation and dementia in older people has been found by a new study. The study, which has been featured in the journal Nature Neuroscience, asked participants to memorize a list of words and recall them after having slept through the night.More

Prepare for the future (and old age) with a universal-design home
The Daily Weekly
From Jan. 15: Good news? We're living longer. Bad news? The number of disabilities are increasing too. At a time when about 85 million baby boomers are turning 65 years old, it's time to think about universal design, a design approach inclusive of people in all life stages and circumstances.More

The Long Goodbye: An interview with author Patti Davis
By Marc E. Agronin, MD
From May 7: In her book "The Long Goodbye" (Knopf, 2004), author Patti Davis, daughter of former U.S. President Ronald Reagan, reflects on her father's struggle with Alzheimer's disease, describing it as a "thief that steals a human being like nothing else can. The only victory over it is in the realm of the soul."More

Prepare for the future with a universal-design home
The Daily Weekly
Good news? We're living longer. Bad news? The number of disabilities are increasing too. At a time when about 85 million baby boomers are turning 65 years old, it's time to think about universal design, a design approach inclusive of people in all life stages and circumstances.More

Could Alzheimer's be Type 2 diabetes?
Daily Mail
Alzheimer's and diabetes may be the same disease, scientists claim. They have uncovered evidence that the debilitating form of dementia may be late stages of type 2 diabetes.More

Number of people with dementia worldwide to reach 135 million by 2050
Alzheimer's Disease International
Earlier this month, Alzheimer's Disease International, a federation of advocacy and research organizations, released a policy brief which reports a 17 percent increase in the number of people living with dementia, compared to the original ADI estimates in the 2009 World Alzheimer Report.More

Antidepressants of questionable value in late-onset illness
Medscape
From June 18: Adults aged 60 years and older with long-standing moderate to severe depression are most likely to derive clinically meaningful benefit from antidepressant therapy. In contrast, antidepressants do not appear to be effective for older patients with late-onset illness, new research suggests.More

Annual Meeting news:
Late-breaking poster submissions due Jan. 15

AAGP
From Dec. 3: To provide Annual Meeting participants with the latest research, AAGP has reserved slots for a limited number of late-breaking research posters. Submissions are due Jan. 15. Late-breaking abstracts describe important current research advances that have not been submitted previously. State-of-the-art studies with up-to-date results will be considered as late-breaking abstracts. The selection of abstracts will be based on scientific quality and novelty of research either in basic or clinical science. Learn more at www.AAGPonline.org/2014CFP.More