This Week in Perio
Oct. 23, 2013

Zombies' ghastly oral health on 'The Walking Dead'
TheraBreath
Zombies far and away exhibit the worst gum disease and bad breath. Discover how to keep them and their problems at bay.More

Dentists say you need to floss. Science says you don't.
Forbes
While working as a research fellow at the Primate Research Institute at the University of Kyoto in Japan, French ethologist Jean-Baptiste Leca witnessed a sight that would prompt a toothy smile from any dentist. One day, a 14-year-old female Japanese macaque named Chonpe plucked a string of hair, stretched it taut between her hands, and ran the strand between her teeth. She was flossing.More

Neanderthals used toothpicks to alleviate gum disease
redOrbit
Scientists have discovered how the use of toothpicks to remove food scraps from between the teeth dates back all the way to as early as Homo habilis. Now, researchers examining the Cova Foradà Neanderthal fossil found this hominid also used toothpicks to ease the pain associated with oral diseases like inflammation of the gums. This discovery, reported in the journal PLOS ONE, is the oldest documented case of palliative treatment of dental disease using a toothpick.More

Chew on this: 8 foods for healthy teeth
LiveScience
Regular brushing and flossing help keep teeth healthy by getting rid of sugars and food particles that team up with bacteria to form plaque. Plaque produces acid that damages tooth enamel, causes cavities and sets the stage for periodontal disease. Now a growing body of research is finding that certain foods may be good for teeth, too. Just as so-called "functional foods" may keep your heart healthy, for instance, others may promote oral health, according to Christine D. Wu, a pediatric dentistry researcher at the University of Illinois at Chicago.More

Dental implants and titanium dioxide nanotubes
DentistryIQ
Dental implants posts are usually made of titanium, surgically placed into the jawbone, and topped with artificial teeth. Dental implants imitate the look and feel of natural teeth, more so than dentures or bridges. While most dental implants are successful, a small percentage fail or must be removed. A scientist at Michigan Technological University found a way to lower that rate of failure to zero using nanotechnology.More

Marquette University dental students prepare to replace baby boomer retirees
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
The merits of a proposed second dental school in Wisconsin and the need to improve coverage for rural and urban residents who lack dental insurance are hotly debated. But two underlying changes in how dentists are trained today may also shape the state's future dental workforce as baby boomer dentists retire and young dentists replace them.More

Dispelling a few myths about hygienists
The Missoulian
October is National Dental Hygiene Month, and this year marks the 100th anniversary of the American Dental Hygienists' Association and the 50th anniversary of the Montana Dental Hygienists' Association. In honor of all the hardworking registered dental hygienists, here are a few myths to dispel.More

The advantages of having an in-office ceramic furnace in your dental practice
Surgical Restorative
Becoming efficient at predictably achieving successful clinical outcomes is the goal for which most of us clinicians continually strive. Working efficiently allows us to be profitable while at the same time offering the benefit to our patients of completing their required treatment in shorter or fewer appointments.More

Dispelling a few myths about hygienists
The Missoulian
October is National Dental Hygiene Month, and this year marks the 100th anniversary of the American Dental Hygienists' Association and the 50th anniversary of the Montana Dental Hygienists' Association. In honor of all the hardworking registered dental hygienists, here are a few myths to dispel.More

Some online journals will publish fake science — for a fee
NPR
Many online journals are ready to publish bad research in exchange for a credit card number. That's the conclusion of an elaborate sting carried out by Science, a leading mainline journal. The result should trouble doctors, patients, policymakers and anyone who has a stake in the integrity of science (and who doesn't?).More

Why is Miley Cyrus' tongue white?
Slate
Miley Cyrus' tongue has appeared on stages, magazine covers, social media feeds, and red carpets. As a cultural touchstone, this band of flesh waggles with enough conflicting meanings and interpretations to make a grad student in anthropology salivate — but before we even start that conversation, can we just confirm that Miley's not dying of rabies?More