This Week in Perio
Nov. 13, 2013

Nanotubes can help improve dental implants
The Daily Mining Gazette
According to Michigan Technological University Assistant Professor of Medical Engineering Tolou Shokuhfar, there is a problem with the current state of bone implants, whether it be for dental or orthopedic: Sometimes they fail.More

Study: Chronic stress changes immune cell genes, leading to inflammation
The Huffington Post
A new study provides a better understanding of why chronic stress leads to high levels of inflammation in the body. Researchers found that chronic stress changes gene activity of immune cells before they enter the bloodstream so that they're ready to fight infection or trauma — even when there is no infection or trauma to fight. This then leads to increased inflammation.More

Periodontal disease may hike mortality in CKD patients
Renal & Urology News
Moderate or severe periodontal disease is associated with an increased risk of death among patients with chronic kidney disease, researchers reported at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2013 meeting.More

Kaiser eliminates periodontal hygienists
The Lund Report
In October, Kaiser Permanente Dental unilaterally eliminated a negotiated job classification, demoting periodontal hygienists to general hygienists. These highly qualified employees, many of whom have been with Kaiser for years, will now be compensated in a lower classification and will see a dramatic reduction in pay.More

How to handle cardiac emergencies in the dental office
DrBicuspid.com
Cardiac emergencies are rare in the dental office, but most states require dentists to have basic life support training. Training your staff to deal with medical emergencies and having an emergency kit on hand can save a patient's life, noted a dental anesthesiologist at ADA 2013. (May require free registration to view article.)More

Drug currently used to treat intestinal worms could protect against periodontitis, according to recent study
DentistryIQ
According to recent research published ahead of print in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, the drug Oxantel currently used to treat intestinal worms could protect individuals from periodontitis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says periodontal disease, a destructive disease which if left untreated can erode bone structures that hold the teeth into the jaw affects half of American adults.More

Study: Fear of the dentist is all in your head
WGCL-TV
For some, the thought of going to the dentist evokes anxiety and panic. Now, researchers think they are closer to discovering an answer as to why this occurs by scanning people's brains while playing them sounds of dental drills and suction instruments.More

The real reason your game is off: Gum disease
STACK
What's keeping you from hitting your top speed on the field or playing your best late in a game? According to a new study, the surprising answer might be: your mouth. Researchers recruited 302 Olympians from the Athletes Village at London 2012, and asked them to undergo an oral health checkup and a personal assessment of the impact oral health had on their quality of life and athletic training and performance.More

Study: Don't neglect oral healthcare in frail, elderly
Reuters
Advancements in dentistry make it more likely that older adults will keep their teeth longer, which means ongoing oral healthcare is essential, a new study says. Unfortunately, it's not unusual for the frail and elderly to have poor oral hygiene.More

How to handle cardiac emergencies in the dental office
DrBicuspid.com
Cardiac emergencies are rare in the dental office, but most states require dentists to have basic life support training. Training your staff to deal with medical emergencies and having an emergency kit on hand can save a patient's life, noted a dental anesthesiologist at ADA 2013. (May require free registration to view article.)More

Dentists say you need to floss. Science says you don't.
Forbes
While working as a research fellow at the Primate Research Institute at the University of Kyoto in Japan, French ethologist Jean-Baptiste Leca witnessed a sight that would prompt a toothy smile from any dentist.More

Periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and rheumatoid arthritis: What triggers autoimmunity and clinical disease?
7thSpace
Rheumatoid arthritis, currently regarded as a complex multifactorial disease, was initially characterized as such at the turn of the 19th century. Ever since, multiple lines of investigation have attempted to elucidate the etiological factor(s) involved in disease incidence.More

What your teeth say about your health
Journal Star
Though most of us only think about our teeth when we visit the dentist, chew on this tidbit: Our pearly whites do more than break down food into easy-to-swallow morsels or dazzle people when we smile. Our teeth may provide valuable clues about our health — and the way we live may also affect the health of our teeth, says Dr. Anne-Marie Bollen, professor of orthodontics at the University of Washington in Seattle. "Your teeth are part of your body, too," Bollen says. More

Caring for your teeth and gums could prevent heart disease
Allvoices
Brush twice daily and floss regularly. This advice isn't only important if you want to have pretty teeth or good-smelling breath; it's important for heart health as well. A new study indicates taking care of your gums could help reduce your risk of heart disease, and it isn't the first study of its kind.More