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Fighting the fight for healthy teeth
ScienceDaily    Share   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
It is known that teeth can protect themselves, to some extent, from attack by bacteria but that inflammation within a tooth can be damaging and, in extreme cases, lead to abscess or death of the tooth. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Immunology shows that odontoblast cells are part of the immune system and fight to protect teeth from decay. Inside a tooth, odontoblast cells sit between the enamel and pulp and produce a layer of dentin to protect the pulp from wear and infection. This research shows that, when under attack from bacteria, the odontoblast cells also orchestrate an immune response, producing antimicrobial peptides to fight the infection directly, protein messengers that recruit white blood cells to the site of infection, and pro-inflammatory signalling proteins that, in turn, initiate an inflammatory response. More



Kimberly R. Miller: Nonsurgical periodontal therapy involves a no-options methodology
RDH    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The rapidly evolving role of the dental hygienist requires that we not only treat periodontal disease but also identify risks for the progression of disease, as well as medical/systemic or genetic contributing factors that may influence treatment outcomes. Additionally, the patients' willingness and ability to comply and follow through with their responsibilities to the success of treatment must be considered. After risk assessment, diagnosis and prognosis have been completed, the process of treatment planning begins. In order to create effective treatment plans with outcomes aimed at disease remission and disease control, an objective step-by-step approach is essential. Using a four-pronged approach to treatment planning will assist you in pinpointing all the treatment options available to meet the needs of your patient. More

Dr. Harold Katz: Gum disease — How to avoid being another statistic
The Huffington Post    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail
article
An astonishing 75 percent to 95 percent of all adults have some type of gum disease (periodontitis or gingivitis), and some of them might not even know they have it. Because of the prominence of gum disease, there have been two recent findings that may help us treat or avoid it. A drug used to treat osteoporosis may help reverse inflammatory gums and teeth. In a post on intelihealth.com, "The News Review" from Harvard Medical School has released an article stating that a drug call teriparatide (Forteo) actually may help bone repair for those suffering from periodontitis. More

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Oral microbiomes offer insight into human disease
DrBicuspid.com    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The first metagenomic analysis of a bacterial immune system in humans over time has found that the defenses of the oral microbiome are unique and traceable, information that could help personalize oral health care in the future, according to a study in Genome Research. With recent advances in sequencing technologies, researchers now are sampling the genetic diversity of entire microbial and viral communities at once, including those residing within us. Recent studies have investigated viral communities of the respiratory and digestive tracts, suggesting that viruses might influence the microbial ecosystem and health of the human host. (May require free registration to view article.) More

Shushil Dattani: How to hold a successful perio referral evening
Dentristy.co.uk    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
There seems to be a lot of uncertainty about when to refer periodontal cases to a specialist for treatment. Against a background of rising litigation in periodontal cases, this is very understandable. If your practice accepts periodontal referrals from others, holding a well-organized educational evening is an excellent way to meet potential referring dentists and share your expert opinion on the issue. Not only does it give you the opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge, it also highlights your dedication to fostering relationships among your fellow practitioners. By meeting potential referring dentists in person, solid foundations will be laid onto which good working relationships may be built. It is also a good refresher course for your own staff. More

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Dr. Mitchell Josephs: Should dental implants be done at a hospital?
The Palm Beach Post    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Q: I need several dental extractions and implants. Should I have this done in a hospital like when I had my hip replacement, or can it really be done in a dental office with equal success?
A: As long as you don't have them done at a flea market between the lady's wig booth and the kettle corn man. Seriously, a recent study in a respected dental journal addressed this.
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Are dental CT scans worth the risk? More Michigan dentists are using them
The Grand Rapids Press    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
High-resolution CT scans that help detect and monitor cancer and heart disease are increasingly being used by West Michigan dentists and oral specialists who want 3-D images to assist with complicated procedures. A local health planning agency is considering a request for a dental CT scanner from a Mecosta County dental practice. If approved, it would become the seventh dental CT scanner in use in West Michigan. Dentists who have them say the machines deliver a superior 3-D image that can be examined from every angle. That allows them to see details like the location of nerves and sinuses before inserting implants or performing oral surgery, which can avoid serious complications. More
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Los Algodones, Mexico, has become dentist capital of the world
Fox News Latino    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A sleepy border village in Mexico, just 1-square mile and steps from the dusty deserts of Arizona, slowly has become one of the dental capitals of the world. Los Algodones, nicknamed Molar City, has a population of 4,000, yet has about 350 dentists, some with so many patients the line swings out the door. Block after block is lined with dental offices and wall-to-wall billboards promising to enhance a smile. The four square blocks of Los Algodones is said to be occupied by more dentists than anywhere else in the world. About 90 percent of its clientele is American. The sun-drenched city is such a dental draw because of its cut-rate prices: about $70 for a filling, $330 for a porcelain crown and less than $20 for a cleaning. More

Own a business? 6 new tax breaks
CNNMoney.com    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Doing your taxes stinks, right? No fun at all. But take note as you brace for your 2010 return: A handful of changes in the tax code could translate into a fatter refund check. The Small Business Jobs Act, passed in September, and the historic health care reform law, passed in March, enacted hefty credits and deductions for capital investments and employee health insurance costs. The following is a rundown of six new credits and deductions likely to affect the most small business owners. More

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Fear of dentists, needles requires sympathetic ear
Mmegi Online    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Dentophobia is an extremely common affliction. Around 12 percent of us suffer from extreme dental anxiety, and the British Dental Association says that 25 percent of the British population suffer from some sort of anxiety before visiting the dentist. Phobias of needles and blood can also prevent people from going to see their GP, from being treated in hospital and from having certain medical procedures. Whether the dentist's drill or doctor's needle is to blame for these anxieties, avoiding them puts your long-term health at risk. The term "phobia" is derived from the Greek word phobos meaning "flight," "panic-fear" and "terror." A phobia is more than just an anxiety. It is an excessive fear of a particular type of object or situation that sufferers then try to avoid at all costs. This kind of fear often is exaggerated and disabling. More

The 10 Best Jobs of 2011 — Dental hygenist ranks No. 10
CareerCast.com    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
In recent years, the job market has increasingly rewarded math whizzes at the expense of less technical professionals. Jobs like actuary, mathematician and accountant all have ranked among the best in America by offering a pleasant work environment, good salary and healthy job security. But in 2011, as the emergence of specialized technologies creates new industries, landing the year's best job requires not just skill with numbers, but a strong knowledge of computers, too. More

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Churchill's dentures sell for more than $25,000
AFP via Google News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A set of solid gold false teeth used by wartime leader Winston Churchill during some of his most famous speeches sold for 16,000 pounds (about $25,000) at auction recently. Churchill had problems with his teeth and speech from an early age and the dentures were designed to compensate for the then-prime minister's distinctive lisp when speaking in public, London auctioneers Bonham's said. The premier's most famous speeches "could have been made over the top of these teeth. I think that's a rather spooky feeling," Bonham's specialist Lionel Willis told AFP. "These particular dentures were designed especially by his dentist to be a loose fix because Churchill had had trouble with his teeth ever since he was a child." More


This Week in Perio
NOTE: The articles that appear in This Week in Perio are chosen from a variety of sources to reflect media coverage of the periodontal and oral health industries. An article's inclusion in This Week in Perio does not imply that the American Academy of Periodontology endorses, supports, or verifies its contents or expressed opinions. Factual errors are the responsibility of the listed publication. In addition, inclusion of advertising in this publication does not constitute or imply endorsement, agreement, recommendation, or favoring by AAP of such information or the entities mentioned or promoted herein.

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