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RESEARCH AND SCIENCE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword PERIODONTAL.

New gum disease treatment to prevent and reverse complications involves key immune system component
Medical Daily
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have discovered a potential new method for gum disease treatment, a new study reports. If successful, the treatment could prevent, halve, and even reverse the effects of the disease periodontitis. Researchers believe their method, which involves a key component of the immune system, known as the "complement system," may offer a non-invasive, therapeutic form of relief. They relied on prior research that found the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis recruits the immune system to inflame the gums surrounding the bacteria.
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WHAT YOUR PATIENTS ARE READING


Columbia researchers target early signs of severe gum disease
NY1
Sixty-five million adults in the U.S. have some form of periodontal or gum disease, and they're in one of two camps — chronic, meaning there's a slow progression of the disease; and aggressive, where the infection takes hold more rapidly. The problem is the signs and symptoms for both degrees of the disease largely overlap.
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Gum disease could make you prone to heart disease
TheHealthSite
Researchers have shown that the same bacteria that cause gum disease also promotes heart disease. In the study, the researchers infected mice with four specific bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum) that cause gum disease and tracked their spread.
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Ignoring gum problems may cause serious health problems including cancer
TheHealthSite
Do your parents nag you to brush your teeth before going to bed and after meals? If yes, then pay heed to their words as it can save you from the terrible consequences 6-year-old Shivam Vatsayan had to face only because he skipped brushing his teeth. It was two months ago when Shivam suffered a severe organ failure, caused by gingivitis, which soon developed into periodontitis due to lack of effective medication.
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Keep your body healthy by caring for your mouth
Epoch Times
The term oral-systemic health is used to describe the integral role oral health plays in maintaining one's overall health and well-being. Diet, cleanliness of the teeth and gums, and the presence or lack of teeth play a significant role in achieving optimum health. Brushing, flossing, regular dental checkups, and cleanings, therefore, are necessary for a healthy lifestyle.
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THIS MOMENT IN PERIO

   
On May 23, 1914, the Organizing Committee met in Cleveland and formed the American Academy of Prophylaxis and Periodontology. The vision for the organization is credited to two women: Drs. Gillette Hayden and Grace Rogers Spalding. Five years later, the association was renamed the American Academy of Periodontology.



AAP IN THE NEWS
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PERIODONTOLOGY.


Warning signs of gum disease
Malden Observer
Most think gum disease is merely a dental issue — but gingivitis/periodontal disease can affect your heart, nervous and endocrine systems as well. According to the American Academy of Peridontology, those afflicted with gum disease are 49 percent more likely to develop kidney cancer, 54 percent more likely to develop pancreatic cancer and 30 percent more likely to develop blood cancers. There is a also direct link to heart disease: Scientists from the University of Florida found the "smoking gun" back in a 2005 study where oral bacteria was isolated in arterial plaque.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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Columbia researchers target early signs of severe gum disease
NY1
Sixty-five million adults in the U.S. have some form of periodontal or gum disease, and they're in one of two camps — chronic, meaning there's a slow progression of the disease; and aggressive, where the infection takes hold more rapidly. The problem is the signs and symptoms for both degrees of the disease largely overlap.

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Attached gingiva and dental implants
Surgical Restorative
The free gingival graft is an age-old periodontal procedure first described by Sullivan & Atkins in 1968. It has long been the gold standard for increasing attached gingiva around the natural dentition. Connective tissue grafting provides many of the same benefits along with root coverage, without the accompanying discomfort from the donor site, making the FGG less desirable.

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How dirty are your dog's kisses?
WFOR-TV
We've all gotten licks of love from our dogs. However, would you let your dog kiss you on the mouth? Urban legend has it that dog's mouths are very clean. "That's not true," said Nova Southeastern University Microbiologist Dr. Julie Torruellas-Garcia.

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CLINICAL INFORMATION


Oral health in the ICU: 'Something to smile about'
Medscape
Attention to oral health in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit is important for a variety of reasons, but it's not always top of mind. Oral health can be a "neglected issue in critically ill adults," said nurse scientist Cindy Munro, associate dean for research and innovation and professor at the College of Nursing at the University of South Florida in Tampa. (May require free registration to view article.)
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Addressing perio-systemic links
Dental Economics
There is a variety of ways to bring the impact of the mouth on the body to daily patient care. It starts by understanding the two mechanisms currently understood to be in play. One is the contribution of periodontal disease to the total inflammatory burden. All sources of inflammation from everywhere in the body are contributors. Moderate to severe periodontal disease is a big source of chronic inflammation — the bad kind.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How dirty are your dog's kisses? (WFOR-TV)
Oil pulling: Does it live up to the hype? (WCIV-TV)
Guess what people are tattooing now (CNN)
New grafting procedure for oral implantation (Dental Tribune)
Energy drinks, frequent meals mean bad oral health for athletes (The Associated Press via The Globe and Mail)

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This Week in Perio
NOTE: The articles that appear in This Week in Perio are chosen from a variety of sources to reflect media coverage of the periodontal and oral health industries. An article's inclusion in This Week in Perio does not imply that the American Academy of Periodontology endorses, supports, or verifies its contents or expressed opinions. Factual errors are the responsibility of the listed publication. In addition, inclusion of advertising in this publication does not constitute or imply endorsement, agreement, recommendation, or favoring by AAP of such information or the entities mentioned or promoted herein.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Patrick McCoy, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2603   
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