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The Western Society of Periodontology Presents:


62nd Annual Scientific Session
October 25-26, 2014
Scottsdale Resort and Conference Center,
Scottsdale, AZ

Contact us for more information: wsperio@wsperio.org

 
Content and advertisements are not endorsed by the American Academy of Periodontology.
See disclaimer below.


RESEARCH AND SCIENCE
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Gum disease linked to chronic health problems
The Conversation
Researchers have found that treating gum disease may reduce heart disease, diabetes and other conditions. The study involved health and dental insurance records from 338,891 people with one of five conditions. The conditions included Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy.
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Good teeth could be a longevity marker
Dental Tribune
Maintaining good oral health may increase the odds of reaching age 100 and over. A recently published study has shown that centenarians and their children have better oral health compared with their respective birth cohorts. The researchers thus suggested that oral health may be a helpful marker for systemic health and healthy aging.
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THIS MOMENT IN PERIO

   
In 2001, for the first time in history, five dental organizations collaborated to present an Interdisciplinary Care Conference emphasizing the importance of a team approach to patient care. Periodontists, orthodontists, general dentists, prosthodontists and pediatric dentists contributed.




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WHAT YOUR PATIENTS ARE READING


Treating gum disease may lessen the burden of heart disease, diabetes, other conditions
Harvard Heart Letter
Gum disease — which begins when the sticky, bacteria-laden film known as plaque builds up around your teeth — is closely linked to premature birth, heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic health problems. Now, a report in the August issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds that treating gum disease can lead to better health — as evidenced by lower healthcare costs and fewer hospitalizations — among people with common health conditions.
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Elderly are at risk for periodontal disease
Wahpeton Daily News
People older than 65 will lose one or more teeth due to periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is a condition that affects the structure surrounding the teeth. This may include the bones and gums.
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Brushing up on healthy gums
Otago Daily News
Bleeding gums are very common but that doesn't mean you should ignore them. They're usually a sign of gum disease. If treated in its early stages, periodontal disease can be easily reversed. But more advanced and severe forms of the disease can result in tooth loss, require complex long-term treatment and are associated with a higher risk of diabetes and other chronic diseases.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Gum disease linked to chronic health problems
The Conversation
Researchers have found that treating gum disease may reduce heart disease, diabetes and other conditions. The study involved health and dental insurance records from 338,891 people with one of five conditions. The conditions included type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy.

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read more
Nonsurgical gum disease treatment reduces thickness of wall of arteries
The Medical News
A simple nonsurgical gum disease treatment markedly reduces the thickness of the wall of the arteries, a risk factor for heart disease, according to a first of its kind study among Aboriginal Australians. The study findings may be of particular importance to Aboriginal Australians, who in general have poorer oral health and higher rates of cardiovascular disease.

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Treating perio disease reduces costs of other medical conditions
DrBicuspid.com
A growing body of evidence shows that periodontal disease is associated with negative systemic health consequences for patients with certain diseases and conditions. To determine the effects of periodontal disease therapy on medical costs and hospitalizations among patients with five systemic conditions, University of Pennsylvania researchers conducted a retrospective study to see if such treatment might prevent or mitigate some of the adverse effects associated with the conditions. (May require free registration to view article.)

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DENTAL INDUSTRY NEWS
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DENTAL.


Nobel Biocare confirms talks about sale of implant maker
Bloomberg Businessweek
Nobel Biocare Holding AG, the world's second-biggest maker of dental implants, is in discussions about a possible sale of the company as interest in medical-device companies increases. The talks are at an early stage and may not result in a transaction, Nobel said in a statement. The company issued the statement in response to a Bloomberg News report that it was working with Goldman Sachs Group Inc. on a potential transaction. Nobel has a market value of 1.98 billion Swiss francs ($2.18 billion).
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Clinical dental advantages of the apically positioned flap
Surgical Restorative
The apically positioned flap is a commonly used surgical approach to achieve pocket elimination. This technique is important for maintaining an adequate zone of keratinized tissue, as opposed to the gingivectomy technique, where soft tissue is resected.
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Indian teenager Ashik Gavai has 232 teeth removed in 'world record' surgery
The Huffington Post
Surgeons have removed 232 teeth from the mouth of an Indian teenager. Ashik Gavai was admitted to JJ Hospital in Mumbai with swelling in his lower jaw. The 17-year-old was suffering from a condition known as complex odontoma or benign tumor of the tooth, head of dentistry Sunanda Dhivare-Palwankar said.
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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword MANAGEMENT.


Discovering the benchmark for your dental practice
DentistryIQ
It's no secret that businesses seek success by looking for the most effective ways to make their goals a reality. In order to learn that information, businesses must continually evaluate themselves, their competitors, and their industry. A measure of success must be set. A benchmark is a point of reference by which things may be compared or assessed. Benchmarks show businesses what best practices to strive for, what is necessary to maintain a competitive edge, and what actions are necessary to adapt to the needs of their customers.
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Building a successful dental practice brand
Modern Practice
If you don't think branding your dental practice is important, think again. A strong brand strategy can help you differentiate your practice and become the foundation for long-term growth and profitability. The brand will become an asset on your balance sheet and will greatly improve the value of your practice should you decide to sell it.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Treating perio disease reduces costs of other medical conditions (DrBicuspid.com)
Grinding your teeth? Relax! There are solutions (The News-Press)
Otzi the Iceman: Non-human DNA found in hip bone of 5,300-year-old mummy (International Business Times)
Study: Effect of endurance training on dental erosion, caries and saliva (dentalaegis)
Bariatric surgery may have negative impact on oral health (Dental Tribune)

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This Week in Perio
NOTE: The articles that appear in This Week in Perio are chosen from a variety of sources to reflect media coverage of the periodontal and oral health industries. An article's inclusion in This Week in Perio does not imply that the American Academy of Periodontology endorses, supports, or verifies its contents or expressed opinions. Factual errors are the responsibility of the listed publication. In addition, inclusion of advertising in this publication does not constitute or imply endorsement, agreement, recommendation, or favoring by AAP of such information or the entities mentioned or promoted herein.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Patrick McCoy, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2603   
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