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RIEMSER, Inc.
Southern Anesthesia & Surgical
Straumann USA
Down but not out: Implant makers navigate economic storm
DrBicuspid.com    Share   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The placing of a titanium dental implant by Per-Ingvar Brånemark into the mouth of a volunteer in Sweden in 1965 was a turning point in restorative dentistry. Over the past 40 years, dental implants have become a preferred means of treatment for missing teeth for many clinicians and patients while growing into a $3 billion market worldwide by 2009. By 1988, some 300,000 implants had been placed throughout the world, according to Kai Klimek, DDS, Ph.D., global manager market communication at Nobel Biocare. Today the number of new implants placed annually now exceeds that figure by a considerable margin, with estimates ranging from 1.3 million to 2 million annually in the U.S., which accounts for 30 percent of the worldwide market. (May require free registration to view article.) More



Bad teeth, gums can threaten health
NewsAroundTheWorld.net    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Bad teeth can pose more of a health problem to a person than just an aesthetics problem. More and more studies indicate that the health of the teeth and gums can affect the health of the whole body, and inflamed gums (periodontitis) can especially negatively affect the health of the whole body. The chronic inflammation weakens the immune system, and is an increased risk of diabetes, heart attacks, rheumatism and lung diseases. More

Dental care cost too expensive even for the insured
Dental Health Magazine    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
According to a recent study by the Ipsos Social Research Institute, around 2 million Americans couldn't afford dental treatment in the past two years. They needed proper dental care, but they simply couldn't afford to pay for it. The same study reveals that even though some of these people had private dental insurance, it still did not cover for the respective dental treatments. The same happens with many of the residents of Sydney, Australia, who did not go to the dentist because they could not pay the out-of-pocket fees. Today these extra high fees do not have a huge impact only on the low-income people, but several million of middle-income families are affected at the same level. More

Implants may cover-up precancerous ridge.

Your patients' keratinized ridges may contain dysplastic tissue. Don't take a chance. BrushTest every keratinized ridge to rule out precancer before placing an implant. MORE.
Visit OralCDx Booth #2148 at ADA.


Protect your heart before it breaks
TODAY    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Gum disease doesn't just make for foul breath and a mangled smile — it's also murder on your heart. If you're breeding bacteria between your teeth, your immune system is on chronic high alert, a condition called inflammation that taxes your vital organs, including your heart. In fact, a woman's chance of having a heart attack may double if she has gum disease, according to the Academy of General Dentistry. Flossing is the best way to banish dangerous oral bacteria, so whip out that string every night before brushing your teeth, says Dr. Mark Schlesinger of the New York University College of Dentistry. More

Gum disease: Wake up call to regular tooth brushing
Vanguard    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Periodontal disease involves inflammation and infection that destroys the tissues that support the teeth, including the gums, periodontal ligaments and tooth sockets (alveolar bone). Gingivitis is due to the long-term effects of plaque deposits. Plaque is a sticky material made of bacteria, mucus and food debris that develops on the exposed parts of the teeth. It is a major cause of tooth decay. If you do not remove plaque, it turns into a hard deposit called tartar that becomes trapped at the base of the tooth. Plaque and tartar irritate and inflame the gums. Bacteria and the toxins they produce cause the gums to become infected, swollen and tender. More
RIEMSER, Inc
Cerasorb® M Dental is a pure phase βTCP used by a growing number of leading implant dentists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, and periodontists for a variety of clinical indications including socket extractions, sinus lifts, ridge augmentations and other grafting needs. Produces bone comparable to autogenous bone. Over 125 published studies.

Learn More at
www.RIEMSERdental.com

Call 888-237-2767
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Straumann AAP Booth #301
Straumann® CARES® Digital Solutions offers dental professionals a means to use an integrated digital workflow to improve efficiencies and create predictable outcomes. Visit Booth #301 at the AAP Annual Meeting for a live demonstration of the complete CARES Digital Solution to experience how it can benefit you.
Learn more.



Avoiding the dentist could end up costing you way more
Business Insider    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Four years ago, 12-year-old Deamonte Driver died of a toothache. Extreme neglect had led to an abscess that spread to his brain and killed him. The Drivers were a desperately poor family in Maryland that had trouble locating an oral surgeon who would work for Medicaid rates. But rich, poor, or somewhere in between, regular dental care has declined as out-of-pocket costs have risen during the Great Recession. But few people know that good dental care can be the key to good overall health. According to the Mayo Clinic, a full menu of diseases can result from poor dental care, including endocarditis (an infection of the inner lining of the heart), cardiovascular disease (clogged arteries and stroke may be linked to oral bacteria), and premature birth and low birth weight babies, to name a few. More

Insufficient evidence for photodynamic therapy use in periodontitis
Evidence-Based Dentistry    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Question: Does photodynamic therapy (PDT) improve periodontal outcomes compared to scaling and root planing (SRP) or no treatment? More



Study: Good oral health key to longevity
The Pioneer    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Keeping your teeth and gums healthy can literally save your life. Bad teeth and gums may play a role in the initiation of serious health conditions like cardiovascular diseases, respiratory infections, adverse pregnancy outcomes, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes mellitus. A team of experts, after evaluating various reports associated with the periodontal and other diseases — published in the last 20 years — has noted that systemic inflammation due to pathogens associated with bad teeth and gums cannot only play a role in the initiation but also progression of life-threatening ailments. More

Perio/cardiovascular/diabetes research
Dental Economics    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail
article
The interconnected nature of periodontal disease, cardiovascular disease and diabetes is supported by such a large volume of research that it cannot be ignored. It must be incorporated into our diagnostic/treatment protocols as dental professionals. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease and the primary driver for cardiovascular events. The development of lipid plaques in the walls of arteries is the result of damage to the endothelial lining of the blood vessel. Inflammation from all sources, particularly chronic inflammation, contribute to atherosclerosis. In addition to C-reactive protein levels, other markers also reveal the strength of the associations between periodontal and heart diseases. More

Introducing the Anatomage Surgical Guide
Anatomage, the makers of the famous Invivo5 software for fast and easy 3D implant planning, introduces the next generation of surgical guides: The Anatomage Guide. MORE


Private equity firm invests in ClearChoice implants
DrBicuspid.com    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
ClearChoice, a developer and manager of dental treatment centers providing same-day dental implants, has received a growth equity investment from Catterton Partners, a consumer-focused private equity firm. The investment will be used to enhance ClearChoice's marketing strategies and accelerate its expansion plan to double the number of ClearChoice affiliated centers across the U.S. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed. (May require free registration to view article.) More

The best (and worst) candy for your teeth
PR Newswire via The Sacramento Bee    Share    Share on
FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
As each October creeps up on Cindy Flanagan, DDS, MAGD, spokeswoman for the Academy of General Dentistry, her mind always wanders to the amount of sweets both children and adults will be consuming during the last few months of the year. "Too many sweets can cause a spooky mouth," Flanagan says. "People have the tendency to graze on the sugary treats lying around the house during the holidays, and this increases the likelihood of cavities." Flanagan knows that candy consumption is almost unavoidable at this time of the year, so she's offering some advice as to which sweets are less damaging to your teeth than others. More



This Week in Perio
NOTE: The articles that appear in This Week in Perio are chosen from a variety of sources to reflect media coverage of the periodontal and oral health industries. An article's inclusion in This Week in Perio does not imply that the American Academy of Periodontology endorses, supports, or verifies its contents or expressed opinions. Factual errors are the responsibility of the listed publication. In addition, inclusion of advertising in this publication does not constitute or imply endorsement, agreement, recommendation, or favoring by AAP of such information or the entities mentioned or promoted herein.

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