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In this issue:

Active Voice: What Happens When an Active Couch Potato Ingests Added Sugar?
Deadlines Approaching for Student and Research Awards: February 2
How Will the New Congress Affect Your Profession and American Health?
  Feb. 2 Webinar to Provide Insights
International Paralympic Committee to Host VISTA Conference in October
Don't Miss Free Online Content from Current Sports Medicine Reports
FASEB Releases Sustaining Discovery in Biological and Medical Science
Sports Medicine & Exercise Science Headlines


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Active Voice: What Happens When an Active Couch Potato Ingests Added Sugar?
By Amy Bidwell, Ph.D.
Viewpoints presented in SMB commentaries reflect opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of ACSM.

Dr. Amy Bidwell is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Promotion and Wellness at the State University of New York at Oswego where she teaches exercise physiology and nutrition. Her research focuses on the adverse effects of physical inactivity and its interaction with diet, obesity and obesity-related diseases. Specifically, Dr. Bidwell researches the adverse effects of a diet high in fructose and low in physical activity. She is a member of ACSM.

This commentary presents Dr. Bidwell’s views on the topic related to her research specialization. See the November 2014 issue of Medicine & Science in Sport & Exercise®(MSSE) for a report that she and her colleagues authored on findings from one of their recent investigations in this topic area.

A diet high in added sugar has already been established to be correlated with increased weight and metabolic disturbances. However, what happens when a person is ingesting moderate amounts of added sugar, either in the form of sucrose or high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) while also being physically inactive? Moreover, in this context, what constitutes being physically active?

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Deadlines Approaching for Student and Research Awards: February 2
Charles M. Tipton Student Research Awards
The awards will be presented to the student with the most outstanding research project of the year.
Click here for eligibility criteria and application.

The New Investigator Awards
These awards will be presented to recognize new investigators who have begun and are likely to continue making significant scientific contributions to knowledge in basic or clinical exercise science and sports medicine.
Click here for eligibility criteria and application.

The Visiting Scholar Award
This award is given to an investigator who seeks further experience as an independent researcher. The award provides financial support for an investigator to visit a clinic or laboratory to learn new and current techniques in exercise science and sports medicine.
Click here for eligibility criteria and application.

NOTE: Criteria for these awards include an accepted abstract to the 2015 ACSM Annual Meeting. Please submit your completed application no later than February 2 even if you have not yet received an official abstract acceptance letter. Abstract acceptance will be verified internally at ACSM and abstract notifications will be mailed out in early February 2015. You may contact the Education Department regarding these awards at (317) 637-9200, ext. 117 or education@acsm.org.

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How Will the New Congress Affect Your Profession and American Health? Feb. 2 Webinar to Provide Insights
Major changes swept through Congress as a result of last November’s election. New faces and leadership have now been sworn in, and Congress is back in session. What are the implications for your profession, ACSM and the future of advocating for physical activity and its cobenefits? All of these questions will be addressed during the upcoming ACSM-sponsored webinar, “Superhighway or roadblock: Outlook for New Congress, Physical Activity, Policy and Advocacy.” Held on Monday, February 2 from 10:00-11:00 EST, this webinar will engage participants with a thorough discussion and expert presenters with insights into the new Congress. Moderated by ACSM CEO Jim Whitehead, the webinar will feature the following:
  • Monte Ward, ACSM VP of governmental relations: Overview of election and changes in Congress
  • Craig Piercy, principal, Bose Public Affairs Group: Key issues and legislation in the new Congress related to promoting physical activity
  • Jennifer Zeitzer, deputy director, Office of Public Affairs/director of legislative relations for FASEB: Budget and impact of new Congress on funding for NIH and other research agencies
To register for the webinar, click HERE. For more information, contact Monte Ward at mward@acsm.org.

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International Paralympic Committee to Host VISTA Conference in October
The seventh VISTA Conference, hosted by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), will be held in the historic Spanish city of Girona October 7-10. ACSM is a host partner of the conference. Experts wishing to participate in a free communication have until February 15 to submit their abstracts for consideration by the VISTA 2015 scientific committee.

VISTA is designed to promote and advance the mission, goals, objectives and reputation of the IPC and provides a platform for the academic world to meet with athletes and professional experts in the field of sport for athletes with an impairment. It provides a forum for exchange on the latest information, research and expertise related to the paralympic movement and promotes cross-disciplinary interaction among sport scientists, athletes, coaches, administrators and the media. Register for the event before June 15 at www.paralympic.org/vista-2015 and receive special pricing. Look for more information about this conference in upcoming issues of SMB.

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Don't Miss Free Online Content from Current Sports Medicine Reports
Check out the two free featured articles from the January/February 2015 issue of Current Sports Medicine Reports at www.acsm-csmr.org. This issue also marks the journal's transition to an e-only publication.

The free featured articles from the January/February 2015 issue include:

Invited Commentary: Exercise Can Protect Against A Broken     Heart
Depression in Athletes: Prevalence and Risk Factors

The articles are available free-of-charge on the journal's website until March 10, so download your copies today.

Current Sports Medicine Reports is the official clinical review journal of ACSM and is written specifically for ACSM physician members to provide a thorough review of the most current sports medicine literature. ACSM physician members receive an online subscription to this journal as a member benefit.

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FASEB Releases Sustaining Discovery in Biological and Medical Science
FASEB works to influence policies that affect the individual scientist's research environment, including funding for clinical, translational and behavioral research. Chester A. Ray, Ph.D., FACSM, represents ACSM on the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Board of Directors.

This week, the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) released an analysis of the threats to continued progress in biological and medical science research. Sustaining Discovery in Biological and Medical Science: A Framework for Discussion examines the challenges facing researchers and presents a series of recommendations to alleviate them.

Sustaining Discovery in Biological and Medical Science: A Framework for Discussion documents how shortfalls in federal funding and rising regulatory costs have constrained research budgets. At the same time, scientific opportunities have expanded and more individuals are seeking funding. These opposing trends have resulted in an increasingly unstable research enterprise, delaying scientific discovery.

In the newly released statement, FASEB offers three broad categories of recommendations for consideration:
  • Increased advocacy for predictable, sustainable growth in research budgets while striving to make optimal use of existing resources
  • Re-examination of the way research is funded, making certain that we provide incentives to encourage the best science and reduce the amount of time spent seeking funding, and
  • Improved preparation and utilization of the workforce. To facilitate feedback from the members of FASEB societies and the broader research community, FASEB has created a website for reviewing the document and recording comments.
— Reprinted courtesy of FASEB. ACSM is a member of FASEB along with 26 other societies, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

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HEADLINES

Headlines include recent stories in the media on sports medicine and exercise science topics and do not reflect ACSM statements, views or endorsements. Headlines are meant to inform members on what the public is reading and hearing about the field.


50 Simple Ways to Stay Fit and Healthy in 2015
Detroit Free Press via USA Today
Year after year, we go along with the January ritual of making resolutions. Then just months, or weeks, later, we break the promises that we made to ourselves. Then we get stuck in the guilt of broken resolutions, and we stand still.

Want to lose weight and live healthier? Try keeping it simple in 2015: Commit to small changes and put yourself on the path to big results.

This vision board contains a list of 50 simple resolutions that will help you ease down the road to better health. Each statement is specific and doable. Start off by picking two tasks, then, as you make progress, add a few more.

Hold yourself accountable, but don't forget to enjoy the process.

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Study: Lack of Exercise More Deadly Than Obesity
HealthDay News via Winnipeg Free Press
Being sedentary may be twice as deadly as being obese, a new study suggests.

However, even a little exercise — a brisk 20-minute walk each day, for example — is enough to reduce the risk of an early death by as much as 30 percent, the British researchers added. "Efforts to encourage small increases in physical activity in inactive individuals likely have significant health benefits," said lead author Ulf Ekelund, a senior investigator scientist in the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge.

The risk reduction was seen in normal weight, overweight and obese people, Ekelund said. "We estimated that eradicating physical inactivity in the population would reduce the number of deaths twice as much as if obesity was eradicated," he said.

From a public health perspective, it is as important to increase levels of physical activity as it is to reduce the levels of obesity -- maybe even more so, he added.

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Sports Medicine Bulletin is a membership benefit of the American College of Sports Medicine. There is no commercial involvement in the development of content or in the editorial decision-making process for this weekly e-newsletter. The appearance of advertising in Sports Medicine Bulletin does not constitute ACSM endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertising. ACSM does not control where the advertisements appear or any coincidental alignment with content topic.

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