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In this issue:

Active Voice: Weight Loss and Obstructive Sleep Apnea — What Lies Ahead?
ACSM Research Drives New Apple Technology Unveiled Last Week
Register for ACSM's Annual Meeting by Tomorrow to Receive Early Bird Discount
ACSM Hosts Briefing About New Bill to Expand Physical Activity
  Education in U.S. Medical Schools
Exercise Professionals: Do You Have the Exercise is Medicine® Credential?
Students: Sign Up Now to Volunteer at ACSM's Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition
ACSM in the News: Stories Making Headlines



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Active Voice: Weight Loss and Obstructive Sleep Apnea - What Lies Ahead?
By Devon A. Dobrosielski, Ph.D.
Viewpoints presented in SMB commentaries reflect opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of ACSM.

Devon A. Dobrosielski, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of exercise science in the Department of Kinesiology at Towson University in Maryland. Dr. Dobrosielski is an ACSM member, focusing his research on examining the impact of exercise and sleep on the cardiovascular consequences of chronic disease. In particular, he is interested in determining whether exercise can serve as an effective countermeasure to vascular impairment commonly observed in the presence of sleep disorders.

This commentary presents Dr. Dobrosielski’s views on the topic of the research article which he and his colleagues published in the January 2015 issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise® (MSSE).

Weight loss is recommended by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine for all overweight adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a disorder associated with obesity and characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction, recurrent arousals and episodic oxygen desaturations during sleep. This recommendation has been bolstered in recent years by several large clinical trials that have demonstrated improvements in OSA severity with intensive lifestyle modification (e.g., dietary change and increased physical activity). These improvements are dose-dependent and are sustained once an intervention has ended or even when weight regain occurs.

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ACSM Research Drives New Apple Technology Unveiled Last Week
By ACSM Vice President NiCole Keith, Ph.D., FACSM.

Test driving the new Apple apps
Last week, Apple announced ResearchKit, a new iOS software framework, that lets people volunteer to join medical research studies. I was representing ACSM in San Francisco for the announcement. Recognizing the public health impact this framework can make, Apple invited professionals from the fitness industry, science and medicine to be guests at the announcement. We had the opportunity to learn more about Apple, witness the company’s commitment to scientific and social responsibility, and learn more about potential partnerships and possibilities. ResearchKit is open source and Apple encourages ACSM and its members to explore cutting edge ways to assess health. Six hours after the release, over 9,000 people enrolled in studies through the five initial apps that were made available yesterday.

"Research Kit is a platform for apps members of the ACSM community can build to collect data and conduct intervention research on physical activity and health,” said Kathryn Schmitz, PhD, MPH, FACSM, who represented the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine at the event. "One point that will be vital to the ACSM community to understand is that Apple will never see your research data. They have constructed the ResearchKit platform in a way that allows for complete anonymity of research participants to Apple. This, and the fact that Apple has made the platform open source (e.g. neutral to Android versus Apple operating systems) validates what Apple contends: they are really interested in using this platform to make the world a better place."

"This is a game changer," continued Schmitz. "The potential for collection of objective biometric data connected to ResearchKit? Wow! The possibilities are endless. Apple stands ready to hear from our community about what we will do with this new platform, so let's go change the world."


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Register for ACSM's Annual Meeting by Tomorrow to Receive Early Bird Discount
Tomorrow, March 18, is the last day to register for ACSM’s 2015 Annual Meeting and receive an early bird registration discount of up to $105.00! Join more than 5,000 basic and applied scientists and clinical medicine professionals in San Diego, Calif. to learn, network and earn continuing education credits and continuing medical education credits. This comprehensive sports medicine and exercise science conference is the one place you can get it all — programming that covers the science, practice, public health and policy aspects of sports medicine, exercise science and physical activity.

This year’s meeting features two world congress events: The World Congress on Exercise is Medicine® and the World Congress on the Basic Science of Exercise Fatigue, which will cover a wide array of scientific material ranging from molecular fatigue to neural mechanisms, critical power and interaction with disease.

If you’re looking for great education and great networking at a great value, then join us at the upcoming ACSM Annual Meeting. Download the advance program or register at www.acsmannualmeeting.org.

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ACSM Hosts Briefing About New Bill to Expand Physical Activity Education in U.S. Medical Schools
This afternoon, ACSM is hosting a congressional briefing about a new bill to incorporate more education about physical activity and nutrition in the curricula of U.S. medical schools. The bill is called the ENRICH Act and is a bipartisan effort introduced by Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, and Rep. Pat Tiberi, R-Ohio. The bill proposes a $15 million competitive grant to expand physical activity education and nutrition education programs for at least 30 U.S. medical schools. A similar bill was introduced last year that focused exclusively on nutrition education. ACSM played the lead role with partner organizations to successfully have physical activity education included.

The National Academy of Sciences recommends all medical schools require 25 hours of nutrition education or less than 1 percent of total training hours—the minimum that experts agree provides basic training for nutrition competency. Less than 30 percent of medical schools today require a dedicated nutrition course and only 13 percent offer a core course about physical activity and health.

Chronic diseases—heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of cancer — are the primary causes of death among Americans. While most doctors recognize the growing need to address lifestyle-related disease, less than 25 percent of doctor office visits include counseling on nutrition, physical activity or referrals to a specialist.

The Association of American Medical Colleges, the American Heart Association and the American College of Preventive Medicine join ACSM in support of this bill.

To learn more about the ENRICH Act, please contact Jessica Frost at 202-527-7342 or jfrost@pcrm.org. Fact sheets are available at www.ENRICHyourhealth.org.

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Exercise Professionals: Do You Have the Exercise is Medicine®Credential?
Physical activity plays an important role in the prevention and treatment of many chronic diseases. Physicians and other health care providers often don’t have the time to go beyond the simple recommendation of “exercise more,” and many do not have the training necessary to develop an appropriate exercise prescription.

The Exercise is Medicine® (EIM) Credential assists health care providers in identifying qualified exercise professionals who can work with their patients based on health status. This credential also provides exercise professionals more opportunities to promote themselves to health care providers. As the medical community becomes more aware of the role that regular exercise plays in the prevention and treatment of disease, and more fully understands the different types of certifications in the field, there will be many more opportunities for certified clinical and health/fitness professionals. The EIM Credential prepares exercise professionals to better meet the growing needs of today’s health care systems, helps them grow their business and expands their opportunities to make a difference by helping others.

For more information about earning the credential, visit: certification.acsm.org/exercise-is-medicine-credential.

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Students: Sign Up Now to Volunteer at ACSM's Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition
ACSM depends on student volunteers to help with vital components of its larger meetings. We are looking for reliable, hard-working and organized students who are attending ACSM's Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition to assist with the registration area, student help desk, logistics and other areas during the summit.

Student volunteers will receive half off of their registration, reimbursed post-meeting for completing a total of four units. There are two seven-unit slots available where students will receive fully reimbursed registration post-meeting. If you have any questions, please email Danielle Davis at ddavis@acsm.org.

Sign up here!

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HEADLINES

ACSM in the News includes recent stories featuring the college and its members as subject matter experts. ACSM is a recognized leader among national and international media and a trusted source on sports medicine and exercise science topics. Because these stories are written by the media, they do not necessarily reflect ACSM statements, views or endorsements. These stories are meant to share coverage of ACSM with members and inform them about what the public is reading and hearing about the field.


What's Hot and What's Not in Fitness
U.S. News & World Report
The American College of Sports Medicine released its "Worldwide Survey of Fitness Trends for 2015" that gives the sports and fitness industry insight into what's driving their market. The editors of ACSM's Health and Fitness Journal® survey health and fitness professionals worldwide about trends to determine what has lasting appeal and can impact the industry and what might be fizzling out of favor. For their purposes, trends are defined as a general development that takes some time to gain popularity, but has longevity. Fads are what I refer to as "fashion fitness" – exercise programs or devices that come on the scene quickly, but almost as rapidly lose their appeal.

I'm a strong proponent of high-intensity workouts that use body weight – the result of the findings from a study I co-authored with Brett Klika (High-Intensity Circuit Training Using Body Weight: Maximum Results with Minimal Investment). I was delighted to see my fellow colleagues ranked body weight training and high-intensity interval training in the ACSM survey as numbers one and two, respectively, and remarked that they're trends to watch. I think they have staying power for several reasons. For one, body weight training is not "new;" in fact, people have been using their own body weight for centuries as a form of resistance training. This type of workout offers convenience because it's obviously very portable, requires no special equipment and is inexpensive. High-intensity interval training has gained in popularity over the past several years, partly because it's been re-packaged by some fitness products and programs. It's defined as short bouts of intense exercise followed by a minimal period of rest. I think it will continue to be popular because of its efficiency; you can get a great workout in less than 30 minutes. These are all reasons why I blended two workouts in the Johnson & Johnson Official 7-Minute Workout App™: to give the convenience of a body weight workout combined with the efficiency of high-intensity intervals.

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Study Suggests How to Get Kids to Play More
WISH-TV
How to get kids to play more. That's what a new study is looking into with help from hundreds of businesses and organizations, including the American College of Sports Medicine, based in Indianapolis.

The report said there are 2 million fewer kids playing sports now than there were five years ago. The effort to find out why and how to reverse that is called Project Play and it's led by the Aspen Institute. Those involved looked at several factors, including making youth sports safer, all-inclusive, and more enjoyable. They focused on kids ages 6-12.

The report says sports leagues for kids shouldn't feel like a mini-NFL or NBA. Before age 12, children shouldn't be cut from teams and should get equal playing time. The recommendations come after talking with kids about what they want from sports.

Ranking in the top five things they found the most fun were getting playing time, getting along with your teammates, and trying your best. Winning wasn't a priority to kids. On average, they ranked winning 48th out of the 81 items listed.

"Often you find adults, parents, who are really driving to win — you can see that sometimes on the sidelines or as fans — and really what kids are about a lot of times is really just the experience of it. Socializing with their friends and doing things that define success," Jim Whitehead, CEO of the American College of Sports Medicine, said.

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Sports Medicine Bulletin

Sports Medicine Bulletin is a membership benefit of the American College of Sports Medicine. There is no commercial involvement in the development of content or in the editorial decision-making process for this weekly e-newsletter. The appearance of advertising in Sports Medicine Bulletin does not constitute ACSM endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertising. ACSM does not control where the advertisements appear or any coincidental alignment with content topic.

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