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In this issue:

Active Voice: Is It Possible to Simultaneously Improve Endurance and Strength?
Purchase Audio from ACSM Annual Meeting Presentations
Congratulations to the ACSM Legacy Members
Southeast Chapter Wins 4th Annual ACSM Student Bowl
Policy Corner: National Conference of State Legislatures Meets with College Leaders
ACSM Members Get 15% Discount on Lifestyle Medicine Course
USOC Hosts 2nd Annual Sports Medicine Symposium on Concussion
Sports Medicine & Exercise Science Headlines





Active Voice: Is It Possible to Simultaneously Improve Endurance and Strength?
By Laura Karavirta, Ph.D.    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Viewpoints presented in SMB commentaries reflect opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of ACSM.

Laura Karavirta, Ph.D., received her doctoral degree from the Department of Biology of Physical Activity at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland early this year. For her thesis, she investigated cardiorespiratory, neuromuscular and cardiac autonomic adaptations to endurance and strength training in aging adults, with special reference to individual training adaptations. This commentary presents her views associated with the research article she and her colleagues published in the March 2011 Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise® (MSSE).

The most recent ACSM physical activity guidelines released in 2007 recommend three to five endurance training sessions and two strength training sessions each week. The rationale behind this recommendation is that both cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength are independently related to health and longevity. Given the training-mode-specific nature of adaptations and the rapid effects of detraining, the aim should be to simultaneously train for both endurance and strength. However, the complex interplay of several control mechanisms at the muscular and cellular level, which enable the human body to adapt to training, seem to be on a collision course when endurance and strength training are performed in tandem.
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Purchase Audio from ACSM Annual Meeting Presentations
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If you weren’t able to attend the 58th ACSM Annual Meeting and 2nd World Congress on Exercise is Medicine® in Denver – or if you missed or would like to re-hear certain sessions of interest – audio recordings from the conference are now available. Click here to purchase and download recorded sessions.



Congratulations to the ACSM Legacy Members
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At the 58th Annual Meeting in Denver, ACSM announced the new Legacy Member designation. The Legacy Member honor recognizes Past-Presidents, past Honor Award recipients and past Wolffe lecturers beginning 25 years after the end of the individual’s presidency, award or lecture. The following Legacy Members were honored at the D.B. Dill Historical Lecture on Friday, June 3. Legacy Members in attendance also gathered for a group photo.


Past-Presidents
John Bergfeld, M.D., FACSM (1984-85)
William L. Haskell, Ph.D., FACSM (1983-84)
Henry S. Miller, Jr., M.D., FACSM (1981-82)
David R. Lamb, Ph.D., FACSM (1980-81)
James S. Skinner, Ph.D., FACSM (1979-80)
Jack H. Wilmore, Ph.D., FACSM (1978-79)
John L. Boyer, M.D., FACSM (1977-78)
David L. Costill, Ph.D., FACSM (1976-77)
Roy J. Shephard, Ph.D., FACSM (1975-76)
Charles M. Tipton, Ph.D., FACSM (1974-75)
Howard G. Knuttgen, Ph.D., FACSM (1973-74)
John Faulkner, Ph.D., FACSM (1971-72)
John P. Naughton, M.D., FACSM (1970-71)
Henry J. Montoye, Ph.D., FACSM (1962-63)


Past Wolffe Lecturers
William P. Morgan, Ed.D., FACSM (1986)
Jerome A. Dempsey, Ph.D., FACSM (1985)
Dirk Pette, Ph.D. (1984)
Frank Noyes, M.D. (1983)
George Bray, M.D. (1982)
William P. Castelli, M.D. (1981)
Loring B. Rowell, Ph.D. (1980)
Edward C. Percy, M.D. (1978)
Ejnar Eriksson, M.D., Ph.D. (1976)
Bengt Saltin, M.D. (1972)


Past Honor Awardees
Charles M. Tipton, Ph.D., FACSM (1986)
Per-Olof Astrand, M.D. (1973)





Southeast Chapter Wins 4th Annual ACSM Student Bowl
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Congratulations to Matthew Dantism, Roberto Medina and Jordan Walker, who won the 4th Annual ACSM Student Bowl at the Annual Meeting in Denver. Dantism, Medina and Walker are all students at UNC Charlotte and represented the Southeast Regional Chapter in the competition.



Policy Corner: National Conference of State Legislatures Meets with College Leaders
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ACSM leaders took advantage of the recent Annual Meeting to meet with executives of the Denver-based National Conference of State Legislatures. The upshot is another partnership strengthened and a boost for the College’s policy agenda.

NCSL’s executive director, Bill Pound, heads a bipartisan organization that provides research, technical assistance and other services to policy makers in the U.S. states, commonwealths and territories. While NCSL does not take a stand on state-level issues, they provide information and model language to aid lawmakers. The Council’s website includes many resources available to non-members, such as links to state legislature sites.

Concussion in youth sports is one area of concern to both NCSL and ACSM. The Council has held up Washington’s Zackery Lystedt Law as a model and continues to track state-by-state passage of similar legislation. One topic discussed in Denver was ACSM’s plans to team up with the American Academy of Neurology at the NCSL Legislative Summit (August 8-11, San Antonio) to promote concussion bills for states that have not already enacted them.

As Craig Piercy and James Brown of Bose Public Affairs noted to the ACSM Board of Trustees and others at Denver, the difficulty of passing legislation in the supercharged federal political climate has made state-level advocacy even more important. The passage of youth concussion laws in almost two dozen states since 2009 provides evidence and encouragement of the effectiveness of state-level strategies.



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ACSM Members Get 15% Discount on Lifestyle Medicine Course
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ACSM members are invited attend a one-day course on “Lifestyle Medicine: Tools for Promoting Healthy Change” by Harvard University’s Institute of Lifestyle Medicine on Friday, June 24 in Boston. ACSM members who register online should select “MA Medical Society Members” can save 15 percent on their registration.

This one-day course will provide the knowledge, skills and tools for health care professionals to effectively and efficiently promote healthy lifestyle changes in their patients. Attendees will participate in lectures and experiential education to gain confidence with the clinical practice of lifestyle medicine. CMEs are also available to attendees.

Visit www.harvardlifestylemedicine.org for more information and to register.



USOC Hosts 2nd Annual Sports Medicine Symposium on Concussion
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article
The U.S. Olympic Committee invites ACSM members to attend their 2nd annual sports medicine symposium, “Exploring Concussions Head On: Current Concepts.” The symposium will be held July 23, 2011 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs.

Utilizing a collaborative approach this symposium provides an in depth look at concussions in sport. This unique approach will encourage healthcare providers to work together across disciplines to provide the best care possible to the patient. This course will give the attendee a look at some of the most advanced evaluation and treatment techniques for concussion injuries. Nine CEUs will be available for this course.



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Exercise and Science Headlines


Headlines include recent stories in the media on sports medicine and exercise science topics and do not reflect ACSM statements, views or endorsements. Headlines are meant to inform members on what the public is reading and hearing about the field.


Are We Built to Run Barefoot?
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
At a recent symposium of the American College of Sports Medicine’s annual meeting in Denver, cutely titled “Barefoot Running: So Easy, a Caveman Did It!,” a standing-room-only crowd waited expectantly as a slide flashed up posing this question: Does barefoot running increase or decrease skeletal injury risk?

“The answer,” said Dr. Stuart J. Warden, an associate professor of physical therapy at Indiana University, “is that it probably does both.”
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Sedentary Behavior Associated with Higher Mortality
Medscape    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
People with higher levels of sedentary behavior, such as prolonged watching television, have higher mortality rates than more active individuals — even when they participate in the recommended minimal levels of moderate physical activity, according to a study cosponsored by the National Cancer Institute and the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), presented here at the American College of Sports Medicine 58th Annual Meeting.

The numerous health benefits of exercise are well known; however, less research has focused on lifestyles that are not entirely sedentary and instead combine some exercise along with higher levels of sedentary behavior, such as watching television.
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Strenuous Exercise May Protect Brain
USA Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Older people who regularly exercise at moderate to intense levels may have a 40% lower risk of developing brain damage linked to ischemic strokes, certain kinds of dementia and mobility problems.

New research published Wednesday in the journal Neurology says the MRIs of people who exercised at higher levels were significantly less likely to show silent brain infarcts — caused by blocked arteries that interrupt blood flow and are markers for strokes — than people who exercised lightly.
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