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In this issue:

Active Voice: Post-World Cup Soccer 2014: What I Observed at Ground Zero
  about Injury Prevention & Concussion
American Fitness Index Releases Trend Reports, Announces Strategic Planning
  Process in Select Communities
Save the Date for "Moving Active Transportation to Higher Ground: Opportunities
  for Accelerating the Assessment of Health Impacts"
Register Now: Aspen Institute's Project Play Summit
Sports Medicine & Exercise Science Headlines


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Active Voice: Post-World Cup Soccer 2014: What I Observed at Ground Zero about Injury Prevention & Concussion
By Nathaniel S. Jones, M.D.
Viewpoints presented in SMB commentaries reflect opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of ACSM.

Nathaniel S. Jones, M.D., graduated from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa. He completed his family medicine training at the University of Iowa Hospital Clinics and his primary sports medicine fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He is clinical assistant professor in the Departments of Family Medicine and Orthopaedics Surgery and Rehabilitation at Loyola University Medical Center in Chicago, Ill. An ACSM member, he specializes in non-operative musculoskeletal and sports medicine and serves as team physician for Loyola University and local high schools in the Chicago area. He also had the privilege of working with USA soccer, including during Brazil FIFA World Cup 2014.

This commentary presents Dr. Jones’ views on the topic related to an article that he authored and was published in the September/October 2014 issue of ACSM’s Current Sports Medicine Reports (CSMR). See the online table of contents for this CSMR issue to view the abstract of his CSMR article.

The Brazil FIFA (Federation Internationale de Football Association) World Cup is still fresh in my mind having experienced it in person, and I can still feel some of the sting of defeat in my heart, as I am half-American and half-Brazilian. The world stage in which soccer found itself, in some instances, helped highlight some exciting recent updates in injury incidence/prevention and concussion.

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American Fitness Index Releases Trend Reports, Announces Strategic Planning Process in Select Communities


New Five-Year Trend Reports for 50 Largest MSA's in U.S.

For the last seven years, the American College of Sports Medicine's American Fitness Index® program, with support from the Anthem Foundation, has published an annual data report highlighting key health and fitness measures for the country's 50 largest metropolitan areas. Last week, the AFI program released a groundbreaking trend report recapping five-year summary data for each city. Your city's trend report is available here. To help you understand the trend report, please view this document. For more information, please visit www.americanfitnessindex.org.

AFI Facilitates Community Investment in Three U.S. Cities

Las Vegas and Cincinnati: ACSM, with support from the Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Foundation, expanded the ACSM American Fitness Index® Technical Assistance Program to Las Vegas and Cincinnati in 2014. ACSM created strategic plans with the assistance of the Las Vegas Healthy Communities Coalition (anchored by the United Way of Southern Nevada) as well as the Cincinnati Health Department’s Creating Healthy Communities Coalition. The technical assistance program is based on findings from the annual AFI data report.

Miami: The Amerigroup Foundation provided a grant to ACSM to continue efforts to improve health and fitness outcomes in Hialeah, Fla in 2014. The grant helped ACSM expand its ACSM AFI technical assistance program working with the Hialeah Healthy Families Coalition. This grant helped launch a city-wide initiative to educate both children and families on nutrition, healthy food choices and fitness activities.

In 2013, ACSM received a $157,782 grant from Anthem Foundation, the parent foundation for Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Foundation and Amerigroup Foundation, to use the AFI data report to initiate locally driven health improvement efforts in these three cities. For more information, please visit www.americanfitnessindex.org.

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Save the Date for Moving 'Active Transportation to Higher Ground: Opportunities for Accelerating the Assessment of Health Impacts'
ACSM is rapidly advancing the cause of active transportation and active cities, both as part of the Designed to Move and ActivEarth initiatives. The upcoming April 13 – 14, 2015 conference, "Moving Active Transportation to Higher Ground: Opportunities for Accelerating the Assessment of Health Impacts" will focus on the evidence base as well as a discussion of key tools and metrics for active transportation. The conference, jointly sponsored and organized by ACSM and the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies of Science, will bring together experts and constituents from transportation, urban planning, public health, health care and health economics to explore the states of the art and practice for quantifying the public health outcomes of active transportation.

Conference focus areas include:
  • Scientific evidence on relationships between active transportation and health
  • Strategies for data collection and methods of data analysis and modeling that contribute to the quantification of impacts on personal, household and community health as they relate to various aspects of active travel
  • Innovative tools and approaches to assess the impacts of active transportation (e.g., health impact assessments of transportation projects or local, regional and state planning scenarios), as well as tools to better forecast the effects on active transportation
Click here to learn more about the conference and register.

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Register Now: Aspen Institute's Project Play Summit
Since launching Project Play last year, ACSM has worked closely with the Aspen Institute Sports & Society Program has hosted 10 roundtables, a televised town hall and a series of "Aspen Timeout" panels at national conferences. More than 300 thought and organizational leaders – including many ACSM members -- have engaged in dialogue, sharing ideas on how to create universal access to early positive experiences in sports. The most promising opportunities will be identified in our forthcoming report, “ Sport for All, Play for Life, ” due out in January. It will propose a new model for youth sports in America, eight strategies that stakeholders can align behind and plug into, and sector-by-sector recommendations to get every kid in the game and active through sports.

Leaders from sport, health/medicine, policy, education, technology, business innovation, philanthropy, academic and any other realm that has a stake in sport and physical activity can join the Aspen Institute and ACSM on February 25 at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. The summit will include a featured panel with prominent athletes and leaders, sessions on each of the eight identified strategies, networking lunch, hard copy of the Project Play report and more.

Agenda, featured guests and other details to come. Register today!

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HEADLINES

Headlines include recent stories in the media on sports medicine and exercise science topics and do not reflect ACSM statements, views or endorsements. Headlines are meant to inform members on what the public is reading and hearing about the field.


How Cold is too Cold for Outdoor Exercise?
The Weather Channel
When Old Man Winter hits, most of us want to curl up on the couch until spring. But a dedicated few keep up their outdoor exercise routines all winter long — regardless of snow, ice and bone-chilling cold.

But when do outdoor running, cross-country skiing and more jump from winter thrills to cold-weather health hazards? That really depends, exercise physiologist and avid skier and skater Michael Bracko, a fellow with the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), told weather.com.

"It’s -10-degrees Celsius [14-degrees Fahrenheit] here, and I’ll be running later today," he said. "Last week it was -21-degrees Celsius [-5.8-degrees Fahrenheit], and I still went for it, and cross-country skied."

The reason Bracko and others can weather such conditions is they're used to it. "If you have someone who is generally speaking healthy, has no significant health issues, and they are used to exercising outside during the winter when it's cold, in truth there's really no temperature that is too cold to exercise — if you're dressed warmly," Bracko said. "If someone ... is a beginning exerciser, then going out and running when it’s crazy cold probably isn’t the best thing to do."

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After Colon Cancer, Activity is Linked to Better Survival
Reuters
More leisure activity - like tennis or jogging – and less TV-time after a colon cancer diagnosis was linked with better survival in a new study.

It was an observational study and can’t prove cause and effect, but cancer survivors who watched more than five hours of TV per day were more likely to die than those who watched less than two hours, said lead author Hannah Arem of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland.

"Our findings suggest that for the one million colorectal cancer survivors in the US, both minimizing TV viewing (fewer than two hours per day) and increasing exercise (4-plus hours per week) may be associated with improved survival," Arem told Reuters Health by email.

In a 1995-1997 National Institutes of Health study, more than 560,000 people, ages 50 to 71, had filled out health questionnaires. Using state cancer registries, Arem and colleagues found that by 2006, almost 4,700 of the original participants had received new diagnoses of invasive colorectal cancer.

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Sports Medicine Bulletin is a membership benefit of the American College of Sports Medicine. There is no commercial involvement in the development of content or in the editorial decision-making process for this weekly e-newsletter. The appearance of advertising in Sports Medicine Bulletin does not constitute ACSM endorsement of any product, service or company or of any claims made in such advertising. ACSM does not control where the advertisements appear or any coincidental alignment with content topic.

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