CoC Brief
Jun. 12, 2013

LIVESTRONG Foundation seeks to automate cancer tool
iHealthBeat
The LIVESTRONG Foundation has released a report that shows high user satisfaction with an online tool to help cancer survivors receive post-treatment care plans, and the foundation is launching a study into whether electronic health record data can help streamline the tool.More

Weekly chemo better in ovarian cancer
MedPage Today
Shortening the time between chemotherapy sessions improved quality of life in women with advanced ovarian cancer without affecting efficacy. In a randomized phase III trial, dubbed MITO-7, weekly chemotherapy with a standard drug combination also had significantly less toxicity than the usual program of sessions every three weeks.More

Study: Genetic testing uptake within cancer-affected families remains low
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Though it can point to options for individuals to manage their cancer risk, take-up of genetic testing for cancer-causing mutations in affected families in France remains very low, Montpellier University Hospital's Pascal Pujol, MD, PhD, has found.More

Sorafenib slows progression in advanced thyroid cancer
CancerNetwork
At the 2013 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, there were promising results for patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer refractory to standard treatment with radioactive iodine. Investigators from the international randomized phase III DECISION trial found treatment with the multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, which inhibits tumor growth signaling and angiogenesis, delayed disease progression by five months in patients with metastatic DTC that had progressed on RAI therapy.More

Women can be screened for colorectal cancer later than men undergoing 'virtual colonoscopy'
News Medical
A new study has found that women can be screened for colorectal cancer at least five to 10 years later than men when undergoing an initial "virtual colonoscopy." Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may help establish guidelines for the use of this screening technique, which is less invasive than a traditional colonoscopy. More

Inhalation therapy for lung cancer shows promise
Health Canal
Lung cancer kills about 1.5 million men and women around the world — more than the number of people who die from breast, colon, pancreatic and prostate cancers combined. Animal studies indicate that delivering chemotherapy through inhalation kills more cancer cells than traditional intravenous chemotherapy. The next step: clinical trials in humans.More

FDA blasts Aveo 1 last time for 'uninterpretable' cancer study
Fierce BioTech
The other shoe has dropped at Aveo Oncology. Days after the Cambridge, MA-based biotech whacked close to two-thirds of its staff as it scrambled to stay afloat in the wake of a scathing regulatory assessment of its lead drug, the developer says that the FDA has handed over the expected rejection notice for tivozanib as a treatment for kidney cancer.More

The weird world of colonoscopy costs
The New York Times
Colonoscopies are one of three standard ways to screen for colorectal cancer. So it is disturbing to learn that the cost of this routine procedure, performed on more than 10 million Americans each year, differs radically from state to state and even within the same metropolitan area.More

Shape-shifting cells help skin cancer spread
Medical Xpress
Scientists have discovered genes that control shape changes in melanoma skin cancer cells, allowing them to wriggle free and spread around the body, according to new research published in Nature Cell Biology.More

Sequester hits cancer patients — doctors, lawmakers seek fix
Yahoo! News
After Congress failed to pass a budget this spring, a 2 percent cut to Medicare chemotherapy drug reimbursements went into effect April 1 as part of the across-the-board federal spending cuts designed to save $85.4 billion this year. More

Blood test may detect colon cancer, early research suggests
NBC News
Most people would rather deliver a speech naked than get a colonoscopy (and some would argue there's not much difference). New research indicates many people may one day be able to avoid the uncomfortable procedure with a simple, noninvasive and reliable test for colon cancer. More