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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit January 21, 2015


 

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Oncology patient navigation: Bringing this crucial role to the forefront
Oncology Nurse Advisor
The founding of patient navigation is commonly attributed to Harold P. Freeman, MD, and his concerns of health care disparities, in particular, correlations between poverty, culture, social injustice, and disease outcomes. In 1990, Freeman created the first navigation program in Harlem, New York, which consisted of outreach community education and access to free mammography screening for low-income women paired with trained navigators who assisted women in traversing the health care system, eliminating barriers to care, and thereby improving the timeliness of care between abnormal finding, diagnostic resolution, and treatment initiation.
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Routine screening for cervical cancer urged
The Journal News
More than 12,000 American women get cervical cancer every year. About one-third of those women will die from the illness. Yet unlike many other forms of cancer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that up to 93 percent of cervical cancers could be avoided by routine screening and vaccination. Even so, the CDC reports that in 2012, about 8 million women in the U.S. between 21 and 65 — that's 10 percent of the female population — said they had not been checked for cervical cancer in the past five years.
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Register now for Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
ACS
The Commission on Cancer (CoC), a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, encourages you to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Chicago on February 27, 2015. This program provides practical information on how to achieve compliance and discusses your role as a member of a patient-centered, multidisciplinary cancer care team. This is the only education program that is developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff. Learn how to turn theory into reality and see how the CoC standards can be used as a guide for the development of a high-quality program that treats patients with cancer.
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Recurrence risk for small HER2-positive breast cancer reduced by combined therapy
Breast Cancer News
A new study of adjuvant paclitaxel and trastuzumab combination in patients with stage I breast cancer found an encouraging progression-free survival rate of 98.7 percent and recurrence risk of 2 percent. The study, titled "Adjuvant Paclitaxel and Trastuzumab for Node-Negative, HER2-Positive Breast Cancer," was published in The New England Journal of Medicine.
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Exercise hormone may offer breast cancer protection
The Wall Street Journal
A hormone released from muscles after vigorous exercise could help to treat or prevent breast cancer, says a study in the February issue of the International Journal of Cancer. The hormone, called irisin, significantly reduced the number of aggressive breast cancer cells in laboratory cultures and enhanced the effects of a chemotherapy drug commonly used to treat breast cancer, the study found.
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Preparing for January's NCDB Call for Data: Pre-edit now
ACS
The annual National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Call for Data opened Jan. 1. Submissions received after midnight CT Jan. 31 will be considered "late" for Standard 5.5. Under very unusual circumstances, the CoC grants short extensions. Please email Kathleen Thoburn at kthoburn@facs.org for extension requests, identifying the reason for the request, how long you expect the problem to last, and the Facility Identification Number (FIN) for the program requesting the extension. Thoburn will inform you of whether the extension has been granted and for how long.

The edits are ready for preediting data for submissions to the NCDB and the Rapid Quality Reporting System (RQRS) in 2015. For registries whose software is using layout 14, information needed for editing is posted. For registries that will upgrade to layout 15 before submission, equivalent information will be available when the conversion program is made available to software providers.

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Random chance's role in cancer
The New York Times
Unlike Ebola, flu, or polio, cancer is a disease that arises from within — a consequence of the mutations that inevitably occur when one of our 50 trillion cells divides and copies its DNA. Some of these genetic misprints are caused by outside agents, chemical or biological, especially in parts of the body — the skin, the lungs, and the digestive tract — most exposed to the ravages of the world. But millions every second occur purely by chance — random, spontaneous glitches that may be the most pervasive carcinogen of all.
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Sun risk for children of melanoma survivors
Medical News Today
A new study has found that children whose parents are melanoma survivors are not receiving the best possible protection from the sun and ultraviolet radiation.
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NCDB to accept PUF applications January 2015
ACS
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) is pleased to announce it will now be accepting applications on a semi-annual basis. From Jan. 5 through Jan. 31, the NCDB will accept applications for organ site-specific files, including cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2012. In July 2015, the NCDB will begin accepting applications for organ site-specific files, including cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2013.
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Two medical organizations recommend use of HPV test for cervical cancer screening
News-Medical.Net
Two leading medical organizations say that using a human papillomavirus (HPV) test alone for cervical cancer screening is an effective alternative to the current recommendation for screening with either cytology (the Pap test) alone or co-testing with cytology and HPV testing.
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Study finds new treatment target for aggressive blood cancer
Medical News Today
Researchers have discovered an interaction between two molecules may contribute to the development of acute myeloid leukemia. They suggest the pathway could be a potential target for treating the aggressive blood cancer and that one of the molecules could serve as a biomarker in personalized therapy of the disease.
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Daniel McKellar, MD, FACS, CoC chair, speaking at the SSO Pre-Meeting
The Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) is offering a half-day Pre-Meeting "Update Course in Surgical Oncology for the Practicing Surgeon" from 1-6 p.m. on Wednesday, March 25 in Houston at the Hilton Americas-Houston Hotel. This session brings together a number of the most influential thought leaders in surgical oncology speaking about controversies, changing standards of care, and practical information for the management of common malignancies and more. CoC Chair Daniel McKellar, MD,FACS, will address "How the Commission on Cancer Serves the Needs of Surgical Oncologists and Patients with Cancer." In addition, the following individuals will be sharing their expertise: Armando Guiliano, MD (axilla), Monica Morrow, MD (breast cancer margins), Barbara Lynn Smith, MD, PhD (nipple-sparing mastectomy), Merrick Ross, MD, (melanoma), Ashok Shaha, MD (thyroid cancer), Kelly Hunt, MD, (clinical trials), José G. Guillem, MD, MPH (colorectal cancer), and Harald Hoekstra, MD, PhD (global issues). Time will be available for questions and discussions. Save the date now, and plan to arrive a day early in Houston to attend this special course. For further information, visit the SSO 2015 schedule.
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Woman diagnosed with breast cancer for third time — and after double mastectomy
New York Daily News
Nine years after having a double mastectomy, Maureen Hanlan has been diagnosed again with breast cancer — for the third time. An initial bout with the illness came in 1990 and then again in 2002. In 2013, Hanlan opted for a double mastectomy. Even though the English woman's cancer was only in one breast, her grandmother had died of the disease, so she wanted to be safe.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists identify new gene that drives triple-negative breast cancer (Medical News Today)
A first in lung cancer: Immunotherapy improves survival (Medscape)
Studies reaffirm that healthy behaviors can cut cancer risk (Medscape)
End of cancer genome project prompts rethink of research strategy (Scientific American)
Preparing for January's NCDB Call for Data: Pre-edit now (ACS)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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