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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Jan. 22, 2014


 



Exercise 'aids cancer prognosis'
Nursing Times
Exercise may improve the prognosis of prostate cancer patients by affecting blood vessels in their tumors, a study suggests. Researchers found that men who walked at a fast pace before being diagnosed with the disease had tumors containing larger and more regularly shaped blood vessels. Better formed tumor blood vessels may in turn inhibit cancer aggressiveness and promote better responses to treatments, the scientists believe.
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Celebrate World Cancer Day
International Union for Cancer Control
World Cancer Day, sponsored by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), will be held on Feb. 4. To help spread the word, the UICC has created a campaign, Debunking Myths about Cancer, that can be used to spread the word. The UICC encourages you to to use, adapt, and share the materials to support your activities on that day. Make sure you include your activity on the UICC map of events that is often visited by various media, organizations, and individuals worldwide.
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A less toxic therapy for low-risk breast cancer
Clinical Oncology News
A new study has demonstrated that treatment with adjuvant paclitaxel and trastuzumab (Herceptin, Genentech) is highly effective in patients with stage I, node-negative, HER2-positive breast cancer. Although this finding comes from a Phase II trial, clinicians believe it will have a great influence on practice. “Paclitaxel and trastuzumab can be considered a reasonable and appealing approach for the majority of patients with stage I HER2-positive breast cancer,” said Sara Tolaney, MPH, MD, a medical oncologist from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Mass.
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Molecular and protein-targeting therapies best for lung cancer with KRAS mutation
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Therapies specifically targeting the molecular profile of non—small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutated KRAS, a cancer-causing protein, are the most effective treatment strategies for patients with NSCLC. These findings were presented at the American Association for Cancer Research–International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Joint Conference on the Molecular Origins of Lung Cancer, Jan. 6-9 in San Diego, Calif.
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Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards
Commission on Cancer
Are you a new staff member just learning the ropes of CoC accreditation?
Is your cancer program considering CoC accreditation and you want to learn about the CoC standards?
Do you need a basic refresher on the CoC accreditation process and standards?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then plan to attend Accreditation 101: Learning the Basics of CoC Accreditation and Standards in Austin, Texas, on Feb. 28. This is the only program developed and taught by CoC surveyors and staff who review the CoC Standards, provide practical information on how to achieve compliance, and discuss the important role you and your cancer team play throughout the continuum of cancer care. Get the information you need from the people involved in standard development and the survey process. For additional information, go to http://www.facs.org/cancer/schedules/accred101.html.

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Cervical cancer: the importance of regular screening
Medical News Today
The American Cancer Society states that cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the U.S. But because more women are undergoing screening for the disease, the number of deaths from the condition have decreased significantly over the past 40 years. However, it is estimated that 12,340 new cases of cervical cancer were diagnosed in the U.S. last year and 4,030 deaths occurred as a result of the disease, suggesting that there is still more that can be done to combat the cancer.
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National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) Call for Data
CoC Source
The official NCDB Call for Data announcement was sent to all programs in a special CoC Source on Oct. 15. The final date for initial submissions is Jan. 31 (midnight Central time), and corrections are due April 1 (midnight Central time). Click "read more" to view the data items required and layout specifications.
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Melatonin linked to prostate cancer risk
Live Science
Men with higher levels of the sleep hormone melatonin may be less likely to develop prostate cancer, a new study suggests. The research also revealed that men who had higher levels of melatonin in their urine had a 75 percent decreased risk of advanced prostate cancer, compared with men with lower melatonin levels. People's melatonin levels are affected by the amount of sleep they get and the quality of that sleep. The hormone is produced in the brain by the pineal gland in response to darkness.
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Radiation research may hold key to rare cancer treatment
WRAL-TV
Standard radiation treatment meant to kill a rare form of breast cancer may make the cancer worse. The most feared form of the disease, inflammatory breast cancer, represents only 1 percent to 5 percent of all breast cancer cases. It tends to be diagnosed at younger ages than other breast cancers, posing the highest risk to African American women. Duke University researcher Dr. Mark Dewhirst found radiation, intended to kill the cancer, actually stimulates the tumor cells to move.
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Target of potent drug for chronic leukemia is confirmed
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A new study helps confirm that a molecule targeted by the experimental drug ibrutinib is critical for the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common form of adult leukemia. In clinical trials, ibrutinib has often shown exceptional activity in people with CLL. The agent targets a molecule called Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). It permanently incapacitates the molecule, and this stops the transmission of an important signal that promotes cell growth and proliferation. But ibrutinib also inhibits other molecules in CLL cells. Like BTK, these molecules are proteins called kinases, and they might be important for CLL cell survival, the researchers say.
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Pathways may identify targets for treating poorly differentiated, anaplastic thyroid cancer
Endocrine Today
Molecular pathways may represent a novel target for poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas, according to data published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Researchers in Portugal profiled the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) gene expression and analyzed the mutational status of N–, H–, andK–RAS; BRAF; TP53; CTNNB1; and PIK3CA genes in a series of 26 ATC tumors and 22 poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) tumors, according to data.
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The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Samantha Emerson, Content Editor, 469.420.2669
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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