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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit February 04, 2015


 

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Scientists find new target for most aggressive breast cancer
Medical News Today
A new study has linked deficiency in a gene that controls autophagy — a process that recycles cell waste — with triple-negative breast cancer. The researchers suggest increasing activity of the gene could be an effective way to treat patients with this most aggressive and stubborn cancer.
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How to measure a medical treatment's potential for harm
The New York Times
Fewer people benefit from medical therapies than we tend to think. This fact is quantified in a therapy's Number Needed to Treat, or N.N.T., which tells you the number of people who would need to receive a medical therapy in order for one person to benefit. N.N.T.s well above 10 or even 100 are common. But knowing the potential for benefit is not enough. We must also consider potential harms. Not every person who takes a medication will suffer a side effect, just as not every person will see a benefit. This fact can be expressed by Number Needed to Harm (N.N.H.), which is the flip side of N.N.T.
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Colon cancer rates rising among Americans under 50
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
Although the overall rate of colon cancer has fallen in recent decades, new research suggests that over the last 20 years the disease has been increasing among young and early middle-aged American adults. At issue are colon cancer rates among men and women between the ages of 20 and 49, a group that generally isn't covered by public health guidelines. "This is real," said study co-author Jason Zell, an assistant professor in the departments of medicine and epidemiology at the University of California, Irvine.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword COLON CANCER.


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Moffitt Cancer Center researchers discover biological markers associated with high-risk pancreatic lesions
Moffitt Cancer Center
Pancreatic cancer affects approximately 46,000 people each year in the United States and ranks fourth among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Only about 6 percent of individuals with pancreatic cancer will live five years after their diagnosis. One reason for this high mortality rate is the lack of effective tools to detect pancreatic cancer early enough to allow its surgical removal. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are now one step closer to devising an approach to detect pancreatic cancer earlier.
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Specialist doctors head for exit as U.S. shifts payments
Bloomberg
The Obama administration's push to transform the way the U.S. pays for health care is splitting the medical profession, as family doctors embrace changes that oncologists, neurologists, and other specialists are concerned will cause turmoil. The government set a timetable recently to extinguish Medicare's "fee-for-service" system, which rewards the quantity of care over quality. That's adding to pressure on physicians who have been debating whether to join their local hospital, merge their practices into ever-bigger groups, or get out of medicine.
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Is it time for precision/personalized medicine?
Dr. Len's Cancer Blog
J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, MACP, writes: "Are we prepared for the genomics revolution? President Barack Obama's proposed Precision Medicine Initiative as mentioned in his recent State of the Union address suggests it's probably time to get ready for some changes in our daily routines as health professionals. I'm not talking about the incredible information that has already been produced by researchers examining the human genome. Nor am I referring to the work that is going on in major cancer centers and elsewhere exploring how to better match patients with genomic analyses of their cancers, for example."
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Daniel McKellar, MD, FACS, CoC chair, speaking at the SSO Pre-Meeting
The Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) is offering a half-day Pre-Meeting "Update Course in Surgical Oncology for the Practicing Surgeon" from 1:00-6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 25 in Houston at the Hilton Americas-Houston Hotel. This session brings together a number of the most influential thought leaders in surgical oncology speaking about controversies, changing standards of care, and practical information for the management of common malignancies and more. CoC chair Daniel McKellar, MD, FACS, will address "How the Commission on Cancer Serves the Needs of Surgical Oncologists and Patients with Cancer." In addition, the following individuals will be sharing their expertise: Armando Guiliano, MD (axilla), Monica Morrow, MD (breast cancer margins), Barbara Lynn Smith, MD, PhD (nipple-sparing mastectomy), Merrick Ross, MD (melanoma), Ashok Shaha, MD (thyroid cancer), Kelly Hunt, MD (clinical trials), José G. Guillem, MD, MPH (colorectal cancer), and Harald Hoekstra, MD, PhD (global issues). Time will be available for questions and discussions. Save the date now, and plan to arrive a day early in Houston to attend this special course. For further information, visit the SSO 2015 schedule.
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Breast cancer prevention drug benefits some but not all women at risk
Breast Cancer News
A team of researchers from the University of North Carolina recently found that Tamoxifen's benefits for breast cancer prevention can compensate its risks of adverse effects. However, not all women appear to benefit from the drug. Tamoxifen is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for primary prevention of breast cancer. However, the drug is not usually recommended by clinicians, as it increases the risks of adverse side effects.
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Bacteria may help battle cancer, study suggests
Drugs.com
Bacteria may offer a new way to treat cancer, a small preliminary study suggests. Researchers injected a weakened strain of Clostridium novyi-NT bacteria spores into tumors in six patients. The bacteria grew in the tumors and killed cancer cells, the investigators reported. C. novyi-NT, which lives in soil, is a close relative of the bacteria that causes botulism. Before injecting C. novyi-NT into the patients, the researchers weakened it by removing its dangerous toxin.
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Which breast cancer patients need lymph nodes removed? Ultrasound narrows it down
Medical Xpress
Which breast cancer patients need to have underarm lymph nodes removed? Mayo Clinic-led research is narrowing it down. A new study finds that not all women with lymph node-positive breast cancer treated with chemotherapy before surgery need to have all of their underarm nodes taken out. Ultrasound is a useful tool for judging before breast cancer surgery whether chemotherapy eliminated cancer from the underarm lymph nodes, the researchers found. The findings are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Upswing in skin cancer costs (JAMA)
New study helps physicians and patients determine prostate cancer risk (Oncology Nurse Advisor)
Safety concerns cloud early promise of powerful new cancer drugs (Reuters)
Patients dismissing 'trivial' symptoms could delay cancer diagnosis (Cancer Research UK)
PDE5 use and prostate cancer, H&N, cervical cancer (MedPage Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 
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The CoC Brief

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642
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Disclaimer: The Brief is a digest of news selected for the Commission on Cancer and the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), both quality programs of the American College of Surgeons, from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The CoC and NAPBC do not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons, the CoC, and the NAPBC.


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