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New study raises questions about antioxidant use in lung cancer patients
The Washington Post
The supermarket labels touting the benefits of antioxidant-rich foods such as frozen berries and green tea are so ubiquitous that many people assume that taking extra doses in the form of supplements is beneficial. But a growing body of evidence, including a study published recently, suggests that high doses may do more harm than good in patients with certain types of cancer. Researchers in Sweden gave vitamin E supplements and a drug called acetylcysteine to mice with early stages of lung cancer, expecting them to slow the tumors’ growth. Instead, the opposite occurred — the tumors multiplied and grew more aggressively.
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New Ohio law incorporates NAPBC standards
ACS
A law that incorporates the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) standards relating to mastectomy and reconstructive surgery will take effect in Ohio on March 20. Under this law, also known as the Lizzie B. Byrd Act, a surgeon, or a health care professional designated by a surgeon, who performs a mastectomy in a hospital must guide the patient through provided or referred services in a manner consistent with NAPBC standards.
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Unnecessary medical radiation driving up U.S. cancer rates, two physicians say
MinnPost
“We are silently irradiating ourselves to death.” That’s the conclusion — and warning — that cardiologist Dr. Rita F. Redberg and radiologist Dr. Rebecca Smith-Bindman, both of the University of California, San Francisco, make in a commentary article published in the New York Times. In the article, Redberg (who is also chief editor of the journal JAMA Internal Medicine) and Smith-Bindman note how the use of medical imaging with high-dose radiation — particularly computed tomography (CT) scans — has skyrocketed during recent years.
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Uterine cancer radiation increased risk for bladder cancer
HemOnc Today
The use of pelvic radiation therapy in the treatment of uterine cancer may be associated with the development of bladder cancer later in life, according to results of a retrospective study. Researchers reviewed the records of 56,681 women from the SEER program’s Multiple Primary-Standardized Incidence Ratio (MP-SIR) database. All patients had received a diagnosis of uterine cancer between 1980 and 2005 and were managed with external beam radiation therapy with or without brachytherapy or without any radiation therapy.
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New CoC Standards manual (Version 1.2.1) is now available for download
CoC Source
Late in 2013, the Accreditation Committee approved important changes to Standard 1.3 that will affect all CoC-accredited programs and new programs working toward accreditation. This communication outlines several changes to this standard. A new CoC Standards manual (Version 1.2.1) is now available for download through the CoC website at http://www.facs.org/cancer/coc/programstandards2012.html. Replacement pages for version 1.2 can also be downloaded from the same page. All changes were effective Jan.1; therefore, we encourage you to read this communication, the new standard‘s definition and requirements, and the ratings in Version 1.2.1 so that the changes can be addressed at your first quarter cancer committee meeting in 2014.
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NIH study offers insight into why cancer incidence increases with age
National Institutes of Health
The accumulation of age-associated changes in a biochemical process that helps control genes may be responsible for some of the increased risk of cancer seen in older people, according to a National Institutes of Health (NIH) study. Scientists have known for years that age is a leading risk factor for the development of many types of cancer, but why aging increases cancer risk remains unclear.
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Chemotherapy after radiation does not improve survival of rectal cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Long-term results of European Organisation and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) trial 22921 with 10.4 years median follow-up show that 5-fluorouracil (FU)-based adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with cT3-resectable T4 M0 rectal cancer does not improve survival or disease-free survival. These results were published in Lancet Oncology.
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Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may improve esophageal adenocarcinoma outcomes
HemOnc today
Response to preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the primary tumor and lymph nodes may extend DFS in patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma, according to results of a retrospective study. Researchers reviewed data on 218 consecutive patients treated for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction at the University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust. The patients, treated between January 2005 and December 2011, underwent either surgical resection alone or surgery plus neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
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Why exercise improves prostate cancer outcomes
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Men who walked at a fast pace prior to a prostate cancer diagnosis had more regularly shaped blood vessels in their prostate tumors compared with men who walked slowly, providing a potential explanation for why exercise is linked to improved outcomes for men with prostate cancer. These results were presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)-Prostate Cancer Foundation Conference on Advances in Prostate Cancer Research, Jan. 18-21 in San Diego, Calif.
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Adding chemotherapy following radiation treatment improves survival for adults with low-grade gliomas, a slow-growing type of brain tumor
National Institutes of Health
Adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain tumor, who received a chemotherapy regimen following completion of radiation therapy, lived longer than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to long-term follow-up results from a National Institutes of Health-supported randomized controlled clinical trial. Since all three chemotherapy drugs in the regimen are commercially available, the treatment used in the clinical trial is available for use now. However, this form of chemotherapy is associated with some toxicities, such as reduced white blood cell counts leading to increased infection risk, and trial investigators recommend that it should be utilized only by physicians experienced with managing the side-effects that may occur.
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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