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Chemotherapy then radiation effective against brain tumor
UPI
Those with low-grade gliomas — brain tumors — who received chemotherapy and then radiation lived longer than those who received only radiation, U.S. researchers say. Co-lead investigator Dr. Jan Buckner, professor of oncology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said all three chemotherapy drugs in the regimen are commercially available, so the treatment used in the clinical trial is available for use.
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Vitamin C as a cancer treatment? High doses boost chemotherapy in study
The Los Angeles Times
Could pumping roughly 2,000 oranges' worth of vitamin C into a patient’s bloodstream boost the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs and mitigate the grueling side effects of chemotherapy? In research recently published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, scientists found that high doses of vitamin C — administered intravenously — increased the cancer-killing effects of chemotherapy drugs in mice and blunted toxic side effects in humans.
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New Ohio law incorporates NAPBC standards
ACS
A law that incorporates the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) standards relating to mastectomy and reconstructive surgery will take effect in Ohio on March 20. Under this law, also known as the Lizzie B. Byrd Act, a surgeon, or a health care professional designated by a surgeon, who performs a mastectomy in a hospital must guide the patient through provided or referred services in a manner consistent with NAPBC standards.
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Weakness exposed in most common cancer gene
Medical Xpress
NYU Langone Medical Center researchers have found a biological weakness in the workings of the most commonly mutated gene involved in human cancers, known as mutant K-Ras, which they say can be exploited by drug chemotherapies to thwart tumor growth. Mutant K-Ras has long been suspected of being the driving force behind more than a third of all cancers, including colon, lung, and a majority of pancreatic cancers. Indeed, Ras cancers, which are unusually aggressive, are thought of as "undruggable" because every previous attempt to stall their growth has failed.
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Daily aspirin use 'reduces ovarian cancer risk by 20 percent'
Medical News Today
Previous research has suggested that aspirin may help to reduce the risk of breast cancer and melanoma. Now, new research from the National Institutes of Health suggests that women who take low-dose aspirin every day may reduce their risk of ovarian cancer by 20 percent. The findings were recently published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The National Cancer Institute states that approximately 22,240 new cases of ovarian cancer were diagnosed in the U.S. last year, and more than 14,000 women will die from the disease in 2014.
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Latest advancements in brain cancer R&D
By Rosemary Sparacio
Promising research and development is being accomplished all throughout the oncology field. This includes advances in brain cancer research, which can be seen in areas as diverse as boosting the immune system to innovative surgery. Patients with one of the most aggressive brain cancers — glioblastoma — typically have a survival rate beyond five years of less than 5 percent. But several recent studies have shown advancements in the treatment of this deadly cancer.
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Cetuximab plus chemotherapy effective in NSCLC
Healio
The addition of cetuximab to platinum-based first-line chemotherapy significantly improved outcomes in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer, according to results of a meta-analysis. The regimen also appeared well tolerated. The analysis included data from four randomized phase 2 and 3 trials that examined the addition of cetuximab (Erbitux, Eli Lilly) to platinum-based first-line chemotherapy in 2,018 patients with advanced NSCLC.
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Smoking tied to increased risk of common type of breast cancer
Reuters
Young women who smoke may have an increased risk of a common type of breast cancer, according to a new study. Researchers found that women between 20 and 44 years old who had smoked a pack of cigarettes per day for at least 10 years were 60 percent more likely than those who smoked less to develop so-called estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Smokers were not more likely to develop a less common form of breast cancer known as triple-negative breast cancer, which tends to be more aggressive.
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New CoC Standards manual (Version 1.2.1) is now available for download
CoC Source
Late in 2013, the Accreditation Committee approved important changes to Standard 1.3 that will affect all CoC-accredited programs and new programs working toward accreditation. This communication outlines several changes to this standard. A new CoC Standards manual (Version 1.2.1) is now available for download through the CoC website at http://www.facs.org/cancer/coc/programstandards2012.html. Replacement pages for version 1.2 can also be downloaded from the same page. All changes were effective Jan.1; therefore, we encourage you to read this communication, the new standard‘s definition and requirements, and the ratings in Version 1.2.1 so that the changes can be addressed at your first quarter cancer committee meeting in 2014.
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Study of female colorectal survivors looks at effects of weight loss
Medical Xpress
Loyola University Medical Center is one of a handful of centers nationwide conducting a National Cancer Institute-funded research study that offers nutrition counseling and free membership to a weight-loss facility to help women who have had colon or rectal cancer reach a healthy body weight in one year. There are more than 600,000 female colorectal cancer survivors in the U.S., and more than half are estimated to be overweight.
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Uterine surgical technique is linked to abnormal growths and cancer spread
The New York Times
Concerns are increasing among doctors about the safety of a procedure performed on tens of thousands of women a year in the United States who undergo surgery to remove fibroid tumors from the uterus, or to remove the entire uterus. The procedure, morcellation, cuts tissue into pieces that can be pulled out through tiny incisions. The technique is part of minimally invasive surgery, which avoids big incisions, shortens recovery time, and reduces the risks of blood loss, infection, and other complications.
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Disclaimer: The CoC Brief is a digest of the most important news selected for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. The Commission on Cancer does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of the American College of Surgeons and the Commission on Cancer.


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